Apr
23
2014
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So you want to be an author…but…

writing_bookEveryone has a novel in them. Or so the saying goes. Friends and colleagues often approach me, often sheepishly, about their desire to write a book, or problems they are having in getting started. Well it’s fantastic news that you want to write a novel! Go for it.

Here are just a few of the questions I’ve been asked. I hope my answers are useful.

1. I have a great book idea but feel it’s been done to death
Most things have been done to death. There is little new under the Sun. There are only so many plots and character types. I’m generalizing, but few ideas are ground-breakingly original. Most are a combination of other ideas assembled in a new way, or from a unique perspective, or with an unexpected twist. Take romances for example, probably the most successful and popular genre ever. There must be hundreds of thousands of books about girl meets boy, girl loses boy, either to find him again or find another, truer love. Tall, dark-haired, emotionally strong, idyllic men feature in most stories, as do plenty of Mr. Darcy’s. There are sweet romances by the dozen, hot steamy affairs, love triangles, unhappy marriages, happy marriages… you name it. If you read this genre, I bet you could name several dozen examples of everything I just listed. So has romance been done to death? Not judging by the thousands of romance books published each year.

Take fantasy: How many books can you name that feature a quest for a powerful magic item, usually one that will save the kingdom or world? Isn’t there always a young farm lad who has a prophesized destiny or secret talent that he learns from an old wizard? Aren’t there always a group of men, elves and dwarves on this quest, and usually one of them is a wizard, one is a knight or paladin and there is some kind of rogue or ninja like character? Sound familiar? Done to death, but extremely popular.

In your own writing, look for ways to make these themes, or tropes, your own. Flip them, modify them, surprise the reader. What if the paladin has fallen from grace? What if the elf finds out that the dwarf killed his brother? What if the magic item is a maguffin, a decoy? Let your imagination run wild – don’t be afraid. Even if it feels cliched and well-worn as you write the first draft, once you get your creative juices flowing you’ll start having all sorts of cool ideas. Try them, run with them. Trust your instincts. Before you know, that quest or romance will be stamped with your own unique ideas and voice. Trust the writing process. I often find that my first drafts lack the depth or originality that I hoped for, but by the time I am ready to rewrite and edit, my head is buzzing with what-if’s, and wouldn’t-it-be-cool-if’s, and the story comes more alive with each draft. I think most authors go through this.

Remember too, that a certain familiarity is what attracts a reader. Why are there so many quest books? Because readers love that plot. Why does the young woman in a romance fall in love with the bad guy against everyone’s advice? Because many readers associate with that issue. Write what people enjoy reading, but make it your own version.

2. How do I start?
Woo, this is a common question and the answer is: anywhere. Trite but true. Writing a novel is an immense and daunting mountain of a task. It’s not surprising that so many budding authors cower at the foot of this obstacle with no idea how to begin. Every journey begins with the first step. Eat an elephant one bite at a time. What these cliches tell us is that any start whatsoever helps us overcome the inertia of our fears. Figure out how you want your story to start and try to write that scene. Don’t worry yet if it is the ideal place to start, or if it even makes sense. Just start writing. OK, what happens next? Then what? Then what? What problem does your protagonist have at the start of your book? Show her trying to deal with that. Perhaps she stumbles. Why? Who or what gets in her way? Who helps her?

Unless you have a firm outline of your story in your head, you just need to start – anywhere – and write whatever comes to you. You might discard these early chapters, but don’t worry about that yet. You have to get your mind into the flow of writing. You have to give it some substance to mull over, some ideas to work with. Trust me, if you just start writing, things will develop. Your mind isn’t used to playing the what-if game yet, so you have to train it. If you find yourself slowing or grinding to a halt, just ask some questions: What would she do next? Should she go down into that cellar or call her friend? What if the lights went out? Keep driving forward. Keep writing. Don’t worry about polish, don’t worry about word choice, just let it flow. Get your ideas down. The first draft is a raw dump of ideas – a giant sandbox for you to play with. Don’t fear the lack of direction. Embrace not being tied down.

3. I want to write so badly but don’t know what to say
There is a misconception about writers that they lounge around coffee shops until the muse strikes them and then they bang out a novel non-stop in a weekend. We wish. I’ve drunk way too much Starbucks waiting for my muse! Maybe she’s a tea drinker. First off, you must have some idea of what you want your book to be about, at least the genre. No? Think about the book you’d most love to read. Maybe it’s like that bestseller by ‘blah blah’ that you wish had ended differently. Why do political thrillers always go to the brink of nuclear war and then make peace, when you’d like to know what would have happened if the nukes went flying? Maybe you lament that there are too many vampire books but not enough about unicorns?

The reality is that most muses only help those who help themselves. Consider my advice for #2 above. It applies in this situation too. If you start writing anything at all, you will likely find your muse peering over your shoulder before too long, whispering you ideas. Alas, too many people never write because: “I’ll write when I’m inspired”. Flip that thought. You’ll be inspired when you write. Writing is a proactive creative process – it requires that you take action. Writers write. Writers make things happen. You wouldn’t think of sitting at home every day and waiting for your future spouse just to ring the doorbell one day. Nor would you expect the Lottery folks to just mail you a check out of the blue. You have to put forth effort to reap the rewards. Trust your subconscious. Start writing anything, even if it’s just a story about a cat walking around the garden. Exercise your creative muscles and then ideas will flow – probably faster than you can get them down!

4. I don’t understand all this publishing jargon, self publishing and formatting, so I’m scared to start writing
Slow down there, Tex! You’re way putting the horse before the cart. That’s like worrying about replacing your tires on the day you buy a brand new car, or that you might burn your bread before you even make the dough. Put those things out of your mind right now. Plenty of time to learn about such things later. Much later. When you get that far, you’ll wonder why you worried because our distant fears are always more menacing than the reality.

Trust that the writing process works. It has done for generations. Concentrate on writing the book. That’s more than enough to occupy your mind for a while, trust me. Before you finish that first draft, you’ll have gained (one way or another) the knowledge of how to revise and edit it. Long before you grow tired of editing it, you will figure out what publishing route works for you and start to acquire contacts, critique-partners, editors, agents, cover designers, and what have you. But right now, forget all that. None of that matters until you write the best book you can. Don’t rush to get to those later stages. All in good time. Right now, simply concentrate on writing your story.

5. I keep getting stuck when my writing goes wrong and I have to start over
This is usually because you are overthinking your first draft as you write it. It’s very tempting to read over your last page or chapter and wrinkle your nose in disgust. What a pile of poo. Now you feel compelled to go back and fix it, edit it, polish it, change the dialog, etc. The trouble is that now you’ve taken yourself out of the flow of writing and put yourself into editing mode, and it’s too soon for that when you are writing your first draft. Now you’re going to be nervous to continue, because you’re afraid to write more drivel like the chapter you just spent days cleaning up.

Another possibility is that you write yourself into a corner where your plot goes wrong, or your character does something you didn’t plan on, or you just don’t know what happens next, or you changed your mind and have a much better idea than the one you spent hours or days writing. So you go back and rewrite it “the proper way”, fixing your problems. Great! Except that you write a bit further and it happens again. So you go back once more and change it. I’ve known writers spend months and months rewriting the first 40 pages over and over until they get frustrated with the whole writing business. Please don’t let that happen to you!

Here’s the thing… you need to accept that your first draft will be junk. Go on, say it. Accept it. Believe it. You’ll have to one day, so do yourself a favor and accept it now. Almost every successful author will admit that their first drafts are junk. It’s part of the process. You can’t write a polished story out the gate. The purpose of the first draft is to blast down all those wonderful ideas in your head, to lay down the foundation of the scenes, roughly in the right order, with the right characters and getting as much of the plot and dialogue down as you can. It’s a framework. A starting point. Here’s another truth: You will make mistakes. You will write yourself into a corner. You will realize huge holes in your plot. You will write wooden characters, cliched dialogue, use horrible adverbs, write verbose and passive statements.

You have permission to do all of that on your first draft, because it doesn’t matter. No, really, it doesn’t. Editing and rewriting is where the real magic happens, and you can’t reach that stage until you have your story down. All of it down. As best you can. So now you understand why you must not start over on the first draft, just keep going forward. Make notes about things to rewrite, things that are broken, but don’t fix them yet. If you can train yourself to write your first draft in this way, you won’t start over and you won’t get stuck.

6. How do I find time to write? I’m so busy
Some people are lucky enough to be able to write all day, or for hours at a time. From the question, I’m assuming you’re not one of those people. Many new authors are not either. We all have families, day jobs and responsibilities. Writing falls low on the totem pole of things to get done each precious day. But you can write a novel in 30 minutes a day, even 10 minutes a day. Many writers rarely get down more than 500 words a day, but it all adds up. I’ve heard of bestselling authors who write on a bench watching their kid at soccer practice, or while their kids are doing homework. One enterprising guy wrote an entire novel on the subway to and from work. Entirely on his cellphone!

Don’t make the mistake of waiting until “one day” when you have hours to indulge on your novel. That time may never come. I bet you make time for your favorite TV show, or for that cup of Joe at Starbucks, or to walk the dog. So too can you make time for your writing. You have to make it a priority. Squeeze in time where you can, or cut out something you can do without. This may mean making a pact with your family, like “8pm to 9pm is daddy’s writing time. You can have my attention all day except this hour.” These schemes might not be ideal, but they’re infinitely better than the alternative of not writing at all. No one is busy 24 hours a day. Good luck!
 

If you have other questions or want further advice or tips, doesn’t hesitate to contact me. Ask away! I don’t bite.

 

 

Apr
23
2014
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Apple CEO Tim Cook Lauds Office On iPad, Chides Microsoft For Not Delivering It Earlier

office-ipad Apple CEO Tim Cook took time to answer a question about Microsoft Office for iPad arriving this past month, and his answer was surprisingly long. “I do see that Office is a very key franchise,” he said, and also added that he “wholeheartedly welcome[s] Microsoft to the App Store.” Cook admitted that Apple’s “customers are clearly responding in a good way that… Read More

Apr
23
2014
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Pure Storage CEO Says $225M Round Gives It Flexibility And R&D Runway

purse storage Pure Storage, a company that has pioneered a way to deliver solid state disk performance for a mechanical disk price, announced today it has received $225 million in Series F venture funding at a valuation of $3 billion. Those are impressive numbers, but it doesn’t stop there. According to company president David Hatfield, Pure Storage achieved 700 percent year-over-year growth and 50+ percent… Read More

Apr
23
2014
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Percona Live 2014 behind; MySQL ahead

I started using MySQL 11 years ago.  That’s not too long compared to other people in the industry, but nonetheless here’s my perspective on the state of the MySQL industry after attending title="PLMCE 2014" href="http://www.percona.com/live/mysql-conference-2014/home">Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2104.

In short, the attitude around MySQL has changed from “Does it work?” to “Is it fast and reliable?” to “How do we manage it?” To further generalize, these periods correspond roughly to the original MySQL AB team, Percona and Oracle, and the last period is the current period so key players are emerging, like  title="WebScaleSQL" href="http://webscalesql.org/">WebScaleSQL.

Does it work?

Peter Zaitsev said in one of his href="http://www.percona.com/live/mysql-conference-2014/keynotes-recordings" >keynote talks that MySQL used to be considered a toy.  Today that assessment is wrong, or at least very difficult to defend.  The proof is that nearly all of the largest and most successful web companies today use it (Facebook, Twitter, Google, Tumblr, Box, etc.), and myriad other web and traditional companies use it too.  MySQL works, but it’s not a panacea and successful companies realize this.  I’ll talk more about this at this later.

Is it fast and reliable?

The have been rough spots, like MySQL 5.0 and the MySQL-Sun-Oracle transition, but MySQL is past these.  The history is, of course, more nuanced but generally speaking those rough spots gave rise to Percona.  Fast and reliable has been at the heart of title="Percona Server" href="http://www.percona.com/software/percona-server">Percona Server even before it was Percona Server (i.e. when it was still a collection of patches).  Other projects and companies were created during this time, but in my biased opinion Percona held the fort.  When MySQL became an Oracle product, the collective MySQL conscience waited to see if they would kill or revive it.  They have revived it.  MySQL 5.6 is great, and 5.7 is looking good so far too.  The work Percona did and still does combined with Oracle’s work has made MySQL a product you can bet the business on.  In other words: MySQL won’t fail you.  Moreover, the work at companies like title="Fusion-io" href="http://www.fusionio.com/">Fusion-io proves that the state of the art apropos performance is alive and well, as highlighted by  href="http://www.percona.com/live/mysql-conference-2014/keynotes-recordings">Nisha Talagala’s excellent keynote “ href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ihR6OOeNSV8" >The Evolution of MySQL in the All-Flash Datacenter.”

How do we manage it?

MySQL has become business.  Let me put it another way that’s difficult to say because I consider myself a hacker but I think it’s true nonetheless (and I’ve heard others say it too): MySQL isn’t cool any more.  ”Cool” is the context of technology a weird euphemism for “new and unstable but useful and promising”.  MySQL was all these in past years, but now it’s mature, proven to be stable and useful, and it has delivered on the promise of being a free, open-source RDBMS that’s stable and useful.  As a business product, the concern is manageability: deploying, scaling, monitoring, maintaining, etc.  These are not new concerns; the difference today is focus: in the past these mattered less because we still had core usability and performance issues, but today MySQL usability and performance are solved problems.  Mark Callaghan’s PLMCE 2012 keynote was aptly titled: “ href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8R0vfMK60w" >What Comes Next?”  In 2012 he saw that MySQL at core was stable, so he turned his attention to things around it which can be pain points, like migrating shards and row compression.  In other words, his message was not “here’s what we still need to fix in MySQL”, it was “here’s what we need to manage MySQL sanely.”  He reiterated this message in a recent blog post, “ href="http://mysqlha.blogspot.com/2014/01/modern-databases.html">Modern databases“:

“We have much needed work on write-optimized database algorithms – Tokutek, LevelDB, RocksDB, HBase, Cassandra. We also get reports of amazing performance. I think there is too much focus on peak performance and not enough on predictable performance and manageability.”

In my humble opinion, this is the current state of the MySQL industry: learning, developing, and establishing how to manage MySQL.  Although the new WebScaleSQL collaboration is focused prima facie on performance at scale, as Mark said in his blog post, “Predictable performance is part of manageability.”  There are many other companies and projects for managing various aspects of MySQL, like href="http://www.severalnines.com/clustercontrol-mysql-galera">ClusterControl for MySQL Galera by Severalnines and href="http://code.openark.org/blog/mysql/introducing-propagator-multi-everything-deployment-made-easy">Propagator by Outbrain (both were are PLMCE this year).

Earlier I said “MySQL works, but it’s not a panacea and successful companies realize this.”  Successful companies like href="http://dyn.com/">Dyn (who presented this year) use MySQL and other technologies.  It’s important to realize that MySQL is one part of a business.  The other parts are title="Hortonworks" href="http://hortonworks.com/">Hadoop, title="Redis" href="http://redis.io/">Redis, title="memcached" href="http://memcached.org/">memcached, etc.   title="OpenStack" href="https://www.openstack.org/">OpenStack and other cloud platforms are increasingly mentioned, too.  Therefore, managing MySQL is only half the story.  The other half is understanding MySQL’s place in and interaction with other business technologies.

In summary, for me Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2014 highlighted how MySQL has become one castle in the kingdom whereas 10 years ago it was an outpost on the frontier.  People no longer ask “is MySQL fast and reliable?” Instead they ask, “how can we manage 100 MySQL instances and a handful of other technologies with 2 full-time DBAs?”  The MySQL industry will continue to add features and improve performance, but we have shifted from doing that in the service of making a stable product to making a manageable product.

The post rel="nofollow" href="http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2014/04/23/percona-live-2014-behind-mysql-ahead/">Percona Live 2014 behind; MySQL ahead appeared first on rel="nofollow" href="http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/">MySQL Performance Blog.

Apr
22
2014
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Sphinx Is A Dock That Turns Your Tablet Into A Remote Desktop Workhorse

Sphinx The Sphinx is a web-connected tablet dock that gives the user the ability to virtualize input devices — by way of a cloud platform and remote desktop integration — allowing them to plug in a mouse and keyboard and work off a tablet as if it’s a quasi desktop PC. Read More

Apr
22
2014
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Datameer Update Brings Instant Visualization To Big Data Analytics

Datameer flipping from data to graphical views and back. Datameer’s latest update has an interesting twist, literally. As you can see by the GIF above, as you work with data in Datameer’s analytics tool, when you click a button, the screen turns revealing a visualization of the data on-screen in real time. Read More

Apr
22
2014
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Electric Cloud Closes $12M Series E Round For Its Continuous Delivery Service

electric-cloud Electric Cloud, a company that offers continuous delivery products, services and support to businesses that want to adapt this software design practice, today announced that it has closed a $12 million Series E round with participation from Siemens’ Venture Capital, US Venture Partners, Mayfield Fund, RRE Ventures and Rembrandt Venture Partners. The company previously disclosed this as an $8… Read More

Apr
21
2014
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Aereo CEO Chet Kanojia Explains The Broadcaster Battle In His Own Words

In the past year, Aereo has fought legal battles in three different states with broadcasters looking to get the streaming TV service kicked off the air, if you catch my drift.

Tomorrow, the case goes to the main stage in front of the Supreme Court, where lawyers from both sides will make oral arguments before the SCOTUS. Read More

Apr
21
2014
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Percona University @Montevideo, FISL & São Paulo MySQL Meetup

id="attachment_22375" style="width: 190px" class="wp-caption alignleft"> href="http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Percona-University-Montevideo.jpg"> class=" wp-image-22375 " alt="Peter Zaitsev at last year's Percona University event in Montevideo" src="http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Percona-University-Montevideo-300x198.jpg" width="180" height="119" /> class="wp-caption-text">Peter Zaitsev at last year’s Percona University event in Montevideo

Later this week I’m excited to depart on a trip to South America. First I will stop in Montevideo, Uruguay, to meet with Percona’s team out there as well as to participate in our next href="http://www.percona.com/news-and-events/percona-university/montevideo-uruguay-2014">Percona University event on April 29.

For those who do not know, Percona University events are free to attend and packed with technical presentations about MySQL and surrounding technologies, delivered by members of the Percona team and community speakers. Even though attendance is free, because space is limited you will need to href="http://www.percona.com/news-and-events/percona-university/montevideo-uruguay-2014">register now to ensure that we have space for everyone.

Next stop will be Brazil, where I’ll be speaking at the local href="http://www.meetup.com/MySQL-BR/events/176776522/" >São Paulo MySQL Meetup group on May 6 and then on to Porto Alegre where I’ll speak at href="http://softwarelivre.org/fisl15/?lang=en">FISL (the International Free Software Forum) ( href="http://papers.softwarelivre.org/papers_ng/public/new_grid?day=9">May 9 14:00) about the “Practical Optimization of MySQL.”

If you’re also attending FISL and would like to connect at the show drop me a note at ceo AT percona.com.

The post rel="nofollow" href="http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/2014/04/21/south-america-bound-for-3-mysql-events-including-percona-university-uruguay/">Percona University @Montevideo, FISL & São Paulo MySQL Meetup appeared first on rel="nofollow" href="http://www.mysqlperformanceblog.com/">MySQL Performance Blog.

Apr
21
2014
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SAP’s New EVP And GM Of Mobile Sees Tech Trends Converging

A variety of smartphones SAP’s new EVP and GM of Mobile, Rick Costanzo spent 15 years at BlackBerry. He saw the smartphone develop from its earliest days, and he’s excited to be working for SAP because he sees its mobile division as the glue holding together several tech trends. Read More

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