Aug
23
2017
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Migrating Data from an Encrypted Amazon MySQL RDS Instance to an Encrypted Amazon Aurora Instance

Migrating Data

Migrating DataIn this blog post, we’ll discuss migrating data from encrypted Amazon MySQL RDS to encrypted Amazon Aurora.

One of my customers wanted to migrate from an encrypted MySQL RDS instance to an encrypted Aurora instance. They have a pretty large database, therefore using mysqldump or a similar tool was not suitable for them. They also wanted to setup replication between old MySQL RDS and new Aurora instances.

Spoiler: this is possible without any logical dump.

At first, I checked Amazon’s documentation on encryption and found nothing about this type of migration. Even more, if I trust the documentation it looks like they don’t support replication or migration between encrypted MySQL RDS and encrypted Aurora. All instructions are for either “MySQL RDS to MySQL RDS” or “Aurora to Aurora” setups. For example, the documentation says here:

You can create Read Replicas of both encrypted and unencrypted DB clusters. The Read Replica must be encrypted if the source DB cluster is encrypted.

When I tried to create an Aurora read replica of my encrypted MySQL RDS instance, however, the “Enable Encryption” select control was grayed out and I could not change “No” to “Yes”.

I had to find a workaround.

Another idea was creating an encrypted MySQL RDS replica and migrating it to Aurora. While creating encrypted MySQL replica is certainly possible (actually all replicas of encrypted instances must be encrypted) it was not possible to migrate it to any other instance using the standard “Migrate Latest Snapshot” option:

However, the documentation specified that Aurora and MySQL RDS use the same AWS KMS key. As a result, both kinds of encryption should be compatible (if not practically the same). Amazon also has the “AWS Database Migration Service“, which has this promising section in its FAQ:

Q. Can I replicate data from encrypted data sources?

Yes, AWS Database Migration Service can read and write from and to encrypted databases. AWS Database Migration Service connects to your database endpoints on the SQL interface layer. If you use the Transparent Data Encryption features of Oracle or SQL Server, AWS Database Migration Service will be able to extract decrypted data from such sources and replicate it to the target. The same applies to storage-level encryption. As long as AWS Database Migration Service has the correct credentials to the database source, it will be able to connect to the source and propagate data (in decrypted form) to the target. We recommend using encryption-at-rest on the target to maintain the confidentiality of your information. If you use application-level encryption, the data will be transmitted through AWS Database Migration Service as is, in encrypted format, and then inserted into the target database.

I decided to give it a try. And it worked!

The next step was to make this newly migrated Aurora encrypted instance a read replica of the original MySQL RDS instance. This is easy in part with the help of great how-to on migration by Adrian Cantrill. As suggested, you only need to find the master’s binary log file, current position and supply them to the stored routine

mysql.rds_set_external_master

. Then start replication using the stored routine

mysql.rds_start_replication

.

Conclusion: While AWS Database Migration Service has limitations for both source and target databases, this solution allows you to migrate encrypted instances easily and securely.

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Aug
09
2017
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How to Configure Aurora RDS Parameters

Aurora RDS Parameters

Aurora RDS ParametersIn this blog post, we’ll look at some tips on how to configure Aurora RDS parameters.

I was recently deploying a few Aurora RDS instances, a process very similar to configuring a regular RDS instance. I noticed a few minor differences in the way you configure Aurora RDS parameters, and very few articles on how the commands should be structured (for RDS as well as Aurora). The only real literature available is the official Amazon RDS documentation.

This blog provides a concise “how-to” guide to quickly change Aurora RDS parameters using the AWS CLI. Aurora retains the parameter group model introduced with RDS, with new instances having the default read only parameter groups. For a new instance, you need to create and allocate a new parameter group (this requires a DB reboot). After that, you can apply changes to dynamic variables immediately. In other words, the first time you add the DB parameter group you’ll need to reboot even if the variable you are configuring is dynamic. It’s best to create a new DB parameter group when initializing your clusters. Nothing stops you from adding more than one host to the same DB Parameter Group rather than creating one per instance.

In addition to the DB Parameter Group, each instance is also allocated a DB Cluster Parameter Group. The DB Parameter Group is used for instance-level parameters, while the DB Cluster Parameter Group is used for cluster-level parameters (and applies to all instances in a cluster). You’ll find some of the MySQL engine variables can only be found in the DB Cluster Parameter Group. Here you will find a handy reference of all the DB cluster and DB instance parameters that are viewable or configurable for Aurora instances.

To run these commands, you’ll need to have the “aws” cli tool installed and configured. Note that the force-failover option used for RDS instances doesn’t apply to Aurora. You should perform either a controlled failover or let Aurora handle this. Also, the group family to use for Aurora is “oscar5.6”. The commands to set this up are as follows:

aws rds create-db-parameter-group
    --db-parameter-group-name percona-opt
    --db-parameter-group-family oscar5.6
    --description "Percona Optimizations"
aws rds modify-db-parameter-group
    --db-parameter-group-name percona-opt
    --parameters "ParameterName=max_connections,ParameterValue=5000,ApplyMethod=immediate"
# For each instance-name:
aws rds modify-db-instance --db-instance-identifier <instance-name>
    --db-parameter-group-name=percona-opt
aws rds reboot-db-instance
    --db-instance-identifier <instance-name>

Once you create the initial DB parameter group, configure the variables as follows:

aws rds modify-db-parameter-group
    --db-parameter-group-name <instance-name>
    --parameters "ParameterName=max_connect_errors,ParameterValue=999999,ApplyMethod=immediate"
aws rds modify-db-parameter-group
    --db-parameter-group-name <instance-name>
    --parameters "ParameterName=max_connect_errors,ParameterValue=999999,ApplyMethod=immediate"
## Verifying change:
aws rds describe-db-parameters
      --db-parameter-group-name aurora-instance-1
      | grep -B7 -A2 'max_connect_errors'

Please keep in mind, it can take a few seconds to propagate changes to nodes. Give it a moment before checking the values with “show global variables”. You can configure the DB Cluster Parameter group similarly, for example:

# Create a new db cluster parameter group
aws rds create-db-cluster-parameter-group --db-cluster-parameter-group-name percona-cluster --db-parameter-group-family oscar5.6 --description "new cluster group"
# Tune a variable on the db cluster parameter group
aws rds modify-db-cluster-parameter-group --db-cluster-parameter-group-name percona-cluster --parameters "ParameterName=innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit,ParameterValue=2,ApplyMethod=immediate"
# Allocate the new db cluster parameter to your cluster
aws rds modify-db-cluster --db-cluster-identifier <cluster_identifier> --db-cluster-parameter-group-name=percona-cluster
# And of course, for viewing the cluster parameters
aws rds describe-db-cluster-parameters --db-cluster-parameter-group-name=percona-cluster

I hope you find this article useful, please make sure to share with the community!

Apr
26
2017
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Percona Live 2017: A Deep-Dive Into What’s New in Amazon Aurora

Percona Live 2017

PostgresPercona Live 2017 is rolling along, and now that everybody got through lunch we’re all recharged and ready for the afternoon. Let’s start it out with Amazon Aurora.

Amazon AuroraOnce of the best-attended sessions was Sailesh Krishnamurthy’s (Senior Engineering Manager at Amazon Web Services) talk on a deep dive into what is new in Amazon Aurora. Amazon Aurora is a fully managed relational database engine that combines the speed and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases. It is purpose-built for the cloud using a new architectural model and distributed systems techniques to provide far higher performance, availability and durability than previously possible using conventional monolithic database architectures.

Amazon Aurora packs a lot of innovations in the engine and storage layers. In this session, Sailesh looked at some of the key innovations behind Amazon Aurora, new improvements to Aurora’s performance, availability and cost-effectiveness and discussed best practices and optimal configurations.

Don’t miss any of tomorrow’s talks! You can find Thursday’s (4/27) session schedule here.

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