Oct
19
2017
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Percona Blog Poll: How Do You Currently Host Applications and Databases?

Host applications and databases

Host applications and databasesPercona latest blog poll asks how you currently host applications and databases. Select an option below, or leave a comment to clarify your deployment!

With the increased need for environments that respond more quickly to changing business demands, many enterprises are moving to the cloud and hosted deployments for applications and software in order to offload development and maintenance overhead to a third party. The database is no exception. Businesses are turning to using database as a service (DBaaS) to handle their data needs.

DBaaS provides some obvious benefits:

  • Offload physical infrastructure to another vendor. It is the responsibility of whoever is providing the DBaaS service to maintain the physical environment – including hardware, software and best practices.
  • Scalability. You can add or subtract capacity as needed by just contacting your vendor. Have a big event on the horizon? Order more servers!
  • Expense. Since you no longer have shell out for operational costs or infrastructure upgrades (all handled by the vendor now), you can reduce capital and operation expenses – or at least reasonably plan on what they are going to be.

There are some potential disadvantages to a DBaaS as well:

  • Network performance issues. If your database is located off-premises, then it can be subject to network issues (or outages) that are beyond your control. These can translate into performance problems that impact the customer experience.
  • Loss of visibility. It’s harder (though not impossible) to always know what is happening with your data. Decisions around provisioning, storage and architecture are now in the hands of a third party.
  • Security and compliance. You are no longer totally in control of how secure or compliant your data is when using a DBaaS. This can be crucial if your business requires certain standards to operate in your market (healthcare, for example).

How are you hosting your database? On-premises? In the cloud? Which cloud? Is it co-located? Please answer using the poll below. Choose up to three answers. If you don’t see your solutions, use the comments to explain.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

Thanks in advance for your responses – they will help the open source community determine how databases are being hosted.

Oct
03
2017
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Webinar October 4, 2017: Databases in the Hosted Cloud

Databases in the Hosted Cloud 1

Join Percona’s Chief Evangelist, Colin Charles as he presents Databases in the Hosted Cloud on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, at 7:00 am PDT / 10:00 am EDT (UTC-7).Databases in the Hosted Cloud 1


Today you can use hosted MySQL/MariaDB/Percona Server for MySQL/PostgreSQL in several “cloud providers” as a database as a service (DBaaS). Learn the differences, the access methods and the level of control you have for the various public databases in the hosted cloud offerings:

  • Amazon RDS including Aurora
  • Google Cloud SQL
  • Rackspace OpenStack DBaaS
  • Oracle Cloud’s MySQL Service

The administration tools and ideologies behind each are completely different, and you are in a “locked-down” environment. Some considerations include:

  • Different backup strategies
  • Planning for multiple data centers for availability
  • Where do you host your application?
  • How do you get the most performance out of the solution?
  • What does this all cost?
  • Monitoring

Growth topics include:

  • How do you move from one DBaaS to another?
  • How do you move from a DBaaS to your own hosted platform?

Register for the webinar here.

Securing Your MySQLColin Charles, Chief Evangelist

Colin Charles is the Chief Evangelist at Percona. He was previously on the founding team for MariaDB Server in 2009, worked in MySQL since 2005 and been a MySQL user since 2000. Before joining MySQL, he worked actively on the Fedora and OpenOffice.org projects. He’s well known within many open source communities and has spoken on the conference circuit.

 

Sep
21
2017
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Percona Support with Amazon RDS

Amazon RDS

This blog post will give a brief overview of Amazon RDS capabilities and limitations, and how Percona Support can help you succeed in your Amazon RDS deployments.

One of the common questions that we get from customers and prospective customers is about Percona Support with Amazon RDS. As many companies have shifted to the cloud, or are considering how to do so, it’s natural to try to understand the limitations inherent in different deployment strategies.

Why Use Amazon RDS?

As more companies move to using the cloud, we’ve seen a shift towards work models in technical teams that require software developers to take on more operational duties than they have traditionally. This makes it essential to abstract infrastructure so it can be interacted with as code, whether through automation or APIs. Amazon RDS presents a compelling DBaaS product with significant flexibility while maintaining ease of deployment.

Use Cases Where RDS Isn’t a Fit

There are a number of use cases where the inherent limitations of RDS make it not a good fit. With RDS, you are trading off the flexibility to deploy complex environment topologies for the ease of deploying with the push of a button, or a simple API call. RDS eliminates most of the operational overhead of running a database in your environment by abstracting away the physical or virtual hardware and the operating system, networking and replication configuration. This, however, means that you can’t get too fancy with replication, networking or the underlying operating system or hardware.

When Using RDS, Which Engine is Right For Me?

Amazon’s RDS has numerous database engines available, each suited to a specific use case. The three RDS database engines we’ll be discussing briefly here are MySQL, MariaDB and Aurora.

Use MySQL when you have an application tuned for MySQL, you need to use MySQL plug-ins or you wish to maintain compatibility to support external replicas in EC2. MySQL with RDS has support for Memcached, including plug-in support and 5.7 compatible query optimizer improvements. Unfortunately, thread pooling and similar features that are available in Percona Server for MySQL are not currently available in the MySQL engine on RDS.

Use MariaDB when you have an application that requires features available for this engine but not in others. Currently, MariaDB engines in RDS support thread pooling, table elimination, user roles and virtual columns. MySQL or Aurora don’t support these. MariaDB engines in RDS support global transaction IDs (GTIDs), but they are based on the MariaDB implementation. They are not compatible with MySQL GTIDs. This can affect replication or migrations in the future.

Use Aurora when you want a simple-to-setup solution with strong availability guarantees and minimal configuration. This RDS database engine is cloud-native, built with elasticity and the vagaries of running in a distributed infrastructure in mind. While it does limit your configuration and optimization capabilities more than other RDS database engines, it handles a lot of things for you – including ensuring availability. Aurora automatically detects database crashes and restarts without the need for crash recovery or to rebuild the database cache. If the entire instance fails, Aurora automatically fails over to one of up to 15 read replicas.

So If RDS Handles Operations, Why Do I Need Support?

Generally speaking, properly using a database implies four quadrants of tasks. RDS only covers one of these four quadrants: the operational piece. Your existing staff (or another provider such as Percona) must cover each of the remaining quadrants.

Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS

The areas where people run into trouble are slow queries, database performance not meeting expectations or other such issues. In these cases they often can contact Amazon’s support line. The AWS Support Engineers are trained and focused on addressing issues specific to the AWS environment, however. They’re not DBAs and do not have the database expertise necessary to fully troubleshoot your database issues in depth. Often, when an RDS user encounters a performance issue, the first instinct is to increase the size of their AWS deployment because it’s a simple solution. A better path would be investigating performance tuning. More hardware is not necessarily the best solution. You often end up spending far more on your monthly cloud hosting bill than necessary by ignoring unoptimized configurations and queries.

As noted above, when using MariaDB or MySQL RDS database engines you can make use of plug-ins and inject additional configuration options that aren’t available in Aurora. This includes the ability to replicate to external instances, such as in an EC2 environment. This provides more configuration flexibility for performance optimization – but does require expertise to make use of it.

Outside support vendors (like Percona) can still help you even when you eliminate the operational elements by lending the expertise to your technical teams and educating them on tuning and optimization strategies.

Aug
29
2017
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Percona Live Europe Featured Talks: Migrating To and Living on RDS/Aurora with Balazs Pocze

Colin Charles

Percona Live Europe Featured Talk Balazs GizmodoWelcome to another post our series of interview blogs for the upcoming Percona Live Europe 2017 in Dublin. This series highlights a number of talks that will be at the conference and gives a short preview of what attendees can expect to learn from the presenter.

This blog post is with Balazs Pocze, Senior Datastore Engineer at Gizmodo. His talk is titled Migrating To and Living on RDS/Aurora. Gizmodo migrated their platform (Kinja) from a datacenter-based approach to AWS, including the migration of standalone MySQL hosts to RDS/Aurora. In our conversation, we discussed how they achieved this migration:

Percona: How did you get into database technology? What do you love about it?

Balazs: I worked as an Operations/DevOps guy for years before I started working with databases. I guess it happened because I was the person at the company that I worked at the time who dared to deal with the database when something strange happened. Somebody had to hold the hot potato. ?

I love that being a DBA is like being a bass player in a rock band. When you do your job perfectly, no one ever notices you are there – but the entire show depends on your work.

Percona: You’re presenting a session called “Migrating To and Living on RDS/Aurora”. What reasons were crucial in the decision to migrate to a cloud platform? Performance? Less management? Database demands?

Balazs: Actually, we migrated the entire Kinja (our platform) to the cloud, so migrating the database wasn’t a question for a second. We moved to the cloud because we didn’t want to deal with hardware anyway, we need flexibility. In the data center days, we had to size the DC’s to handle all of our traffic at any given moment. This means we had to burn a lot of money on underutilized machines. In the cloud, we can spin up machines when we need more computing power. In conjunction, our hardware just got old enough so that it made sense to consider what was a better idea: buying lots of expensive hardware, keep it running, dealing with the hardware (the majority of the ops team lives on a different continent than our servers!) or simply migrating everything to the cloud. That was simpler and safer.

But we didn’t just migrate to the cloud, we also migrated to RDS – managed database service instead of servers with a database on them. The reason to start using RDS was that I didn’t want to re-implement all of the automation stacks we had on the data centers. That seemed like too much work with too many points of failure. When I checked how to fix those failure points, the entire project started to look like the Deathstar. The original database stack was growing organically in the given data center scenario, and reimplementing it for the cloud seemed unsafe.

Percona: How smoothly was the transition, and did you hit unexpected complications? How did you overcome them?

Balazs: The transition was smooth and, from our reader’s view, unnoticeable. Since the majority of my talk will be about those complications and the ways we solved them, I think it would be best if I answer this question during my session. ?

But there’s a non-exhaustive list: we had to switch back from GTID to old-fashioned replication, we had to set up SSL proxies to connect securely the data center and the cloud environment, and after we had to debug a lot of packet loss and TCP overload on the VPN channel. It was fun, actually.

Percona: What do you want attendees to take away from your session? Why should they attend?

Balazs: This session will be about how we had to change our view of the database, and what differences we met in the cloud compared to the hardware world. If somebody plans to migrate to the cloud (especially AWS/RDS), I recommend they check out my talk, because some of the paths we walked down were dead ends. I’ll share what we found, so you don’t have to make the same mistakes we did. It will spare you some time.

Percona: What are you most looking forward to at Percona Live Europe 2017?

Balazs: Three things: hearing about new technologies, learning best practices, and most importantly meeting up with the people I always meet at Percona conferences. There is a really good community with lots of great people. I am always looking forward to seeing them again.

Want to find out more about Balazs and RDS migration? Register for Percona Live Europe 2017, and see his talk Migrating To and Living on RDS/Aurora. Register now to get the best price! Use discount code SeeMeSpeakPLE17 to get 10% off your registration.

Percona Live Open Source Database Conference Europe 2017 in Dublin is the premier European open source event for the data performance ecosystem. It is the place to be for the open source community as well as businesses that thrive in the MySQL, MariaDB, MongoDB, time series database, cloud, big data and Internet of Things (IoT) marketplaces. Attendees include DBAs, sysadmins, developers, architects, CTOs, CEOs, and vendors from around the world.

The Percona Live Open Source Database Conference Europe will be September 25-27, 2017 at the Radisson Blu Royal Hotel, Dublin.

Aug
23
2017
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Migrating Data from an Encrypted Amazon MySQL RDS Instance to an Encrypted Amazon Aurora Instance

Migrating Data

Migrating DataIn this blog post, we’ll discuss migrating data from encrypted Amazon MySQL RDS to encrypted Amazon Aurora.

One of my customers wanted to migrate from an encrypted MySQL RDS instance to an encrypted Aurora instance. They have a pretty large database, therefore using mysqldump or a similar tool was not suitable for them. They also wanted to setup replication between old MySQL RDS and new Aurora instances.

Spoiler: this is possible without any logical dump.

At first, I checked Amazon’s documentation on encryption and found nothing about this type of migration. Even more, if I trust the documentation it looks like they don’t support replication or migration between encrypted MySQL RDS and encrypted Aurora. All instructions are for either “MySQL RDS to MySQL RDS” or “Aurora to Aurora” setups. For example, the documentation says here:

You can create Read Replicas of both encrypted and unencrypted DB clusters. The Read Replica must be encrypted if the source DB cluster is encrypted.

When I tried to create an Aurora read replica of my encrypted MySQL RDS instance, however, the “Enable Encryption” select control was grayed out and I could not change “No” to “Yes”.

I had to find a workaround.

Another idea was creating an encrypted MySQL RDS replica and migrating it to Aurora. While creating encrypted MySQL replica is certainly possible (actually all replicas of encrypted instances must be encrypted) it was not possible to migrate it to any other instance using the standard “Migrate Latest Snapshot” option:

However, the documentation specified that Aurora and MySQL RDS use the same AWS KMS key. As a result, both kinds of encryption should be compatible (if not practically the same). Amazon also has the “AWS Database Migration Service“, which has this promising section in its FAQ:

Q. Can I replicate data from encrypted data sources?

Yes, AWS Database Migration Service can read and write from and to encrypted databases. AWS Database Migration Service connects to your database endpoints on the SQL interface layer. If you use the Transparent Data Encryption features of Oracle or SQL Server, AWS Database Migration Service will be able to extract decrypted data from such sources and replicate it to the target. The same applies to storage-level encryption. As long as AWS Database Migration Service has the correct credentials to the database source, it will be able to connect to the source and propagate data (in decrypted form) to the target. We recommend using encryption-at-rest on the target to maintain the confidentiality of your information. If you use application-level encryption, the data will be transmitted through AWS Database Migration Service as is, in encrypted format, and then inserted into the target database.

I decided to give it a try. And it worked!

The next step was to make this newly migrated Aurora encrypted instance a read replica of the original MySQL RDS instance. This is easy in part with the help of great how-to on migration by Adrian Cantrill. As suggested, you only need to find the master’s binary log file, current position and supply them to the stored routine

mysql.rds_set_external_master

. Then start replication using the stored routine

mysql.rds_start_replication

.

Conclusion: While AWS Database Migration Service has limitations for both source and target databases, this solution allows you to migrate encrypted instances easily and securely.

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Aug
09
2017
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How to Configure Aurora RDS Parameters

Aurora RDS Parameters

Aurora RDS ParametersIn this blog post, we’ll look at some tips on how to configure Aurora RDS parameters.

I was recently deploying a few Aurora RDS instances, a process very similar to configuring a regular RDS instance. I noticed a few minor differences in the way you configure Aurora RDS parameters, and very few articles on how the commands should be structured (for RDS as well as Aurora). The only real literature available is the official Amazon RDS documentation.

This blog provides a concise “how-to” guide to quickly change Aurora RDS parameters using the AWS CLI. Aurora retains the parameter group model introduced with RDS, with new instances having the default read only parameter groups. For a new instance, you need to create and allocate a new parameter group (this requires a DB reboot). After that, you can apply changes to dynamic variables immediately. In other words, the first time you add the DB parameter group you’ll need to reboot even if the variable you are configuring is dynamic. It’s best to create a new DB parameter group when initializing your clusters. Nothing stops you from adding more than one host to the same DB Parameter Group rather than creating one per instance.

In addition to the DB Parameter Group, each instance is also allocated a DB Cluster Parameter Group. The DB Parameter Group is used for instance-level parameters, while the DB Cluster Parameter Group is used for cluster-level parameters (and applies to all instances in a cluster). You’ll find some of the MySQL engine variables can only be found in the DB Cluster Parameter Group. Here you will find a handy reference of all the DB cluster and DB instance parameters that are viewable or configurable for Aurora instances.

To run these commands, you’ll need to have the “aws” cli tool installed and configured. Note that the force-failover option used for RDS instances doesn’t apply to Aurora. You should perform either a controlled failover or let Aurora handle this. Also, the group family to use for Aurora is “oscar5.6”. The commands to set this up are as follows:

aws rds create-db-parameter-group
    --db-parameter-group-name percona-opt
    --db-parameter-group-family oscar5.6
    --description "Percona Optimizations"
aws rds modify-db-parameter-group
    --db-parameter-group-name percona-opt
    --parameters "ParameterName=max_connections,ParameterValue=5000,ApplyMethod=immediate"
# For each instance-name:
aws rds modify-db-instance --db-instance-identifier <instance-name>
    --db-parameter-group-name=percona-opt
aws rds reboot-db-instance
    --db-instance-identifier <instance-name>

Once you create the initial DB parameter group, configure the variables as follows:

aws rds modify-db-parameter-group
    --db-parameter-group-name <instance-name>
    --parameters "ParameterName=max_connect_errors,ParameterValue=999999,ApplyMethod=immediate"
aws rds modify-db-parameter-group
    --db-parameter-group-name <instance-name>
    --parameters "ParameterName=max_connect_errors,ParameterValue=999999,ApplyMethod=immediate"
## Verifying change:
aws rds describe-db-parameters
      --db-parameter-group-name aurora-instance-1
      | grep -B7 -A2 'max_connect_errors'

Please keep in mind, it can take a few seconds to propagate changes to nodes. Give it a moment before checking the values with “show global variables”. You can configure the DB Cluster Parameter group similarly, for example:

# Create a new db cluster parameter group
aws rds create-db-cluster-parameter-group --db-cluster-parameter-group-name percona-cluster --db-parameter-group-family oscar5.6 --description "new cluster group"
# Tune a variable on the db cluster parameter group
aws rds modify-db-cluster-parameter-group --db-cluster-parameter-group-name percona-cluster --parameters "ParameterName=innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit,ParameterValue=2,ApplyMethod=immediate"
# Allocate the new db cluster parameter to your cluster
aws rds modify-db-cluster --db-cluster-identifier <cluster_identifier> --db-cluster-parameter-group-name=percona-cluster
# And of course, for viewing the cluster parameters
aws rds describe-db-cluster-parameters --db-cluster-parameter-group-name=percona-cluster

I hope you find this article useful, please make sure to share with the community!

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