Oct
24
2017
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Community Matters

Community Matters

Community MattersBuilding on community

Percona is very committed to open source database software. We think of ourselves as unbiased champions of open source database solutions. With that, we also carry a responsibility to the open source database community – whether MySQL®, MongoDB®, ProxySQL or other open source database technology. We’ve seen that, and taken action by hiring a Community Manager.

That’s me. Which is great… For me!

And my job, in a nutshell, is to help to make our community great for you. By building on the good stuff that’s been done in the past and finding ways to do more.

The common thread tying the community together is the sharing of information, experience, and knowledge. Hundreds of you have taken part in Percona Live or Percona Live Europe — thank you for that! Props if you’ve done both. If you’ve proposed a paper (selected or not), presented a session, given a tutorial, staffed a booth or sponsored the event – kudos!

Maybe you’ve benefited from or run sessions at a Percona University (the next one is in Kiev in November and it’s FREE). Or caught up with Percona staff at one of the many tech conferences we attend during the year.

You might have used our code, added to our code, spotted and logged bugs, given feedback or requested new features. Helped out other users in forums, written to question-and-answer sites like Stack Overflow. Maybe you’ve blogged about using Percona software on your own blog, or looked for help on the Percona Database Performance Blog. You might have recommended our software to your company, or a colleague, or a client or a friend. Or even a stranger. Mentioned us in passing in conversation. Read our e-books, watched our webinars, shared a link or reached out to Percona via social media.

All excellent, valuable and much-appreciated contributions to the community.

Ways you can join in

Have a think about these opportunities to shine, share and make the Percona community best-in-class.

  • Take part in our forum: we really try to keep up, but there are always more questions than we can address. It’s easy to think of the forums as a support queue but honestly, we are MORE than delighted when we have help from you.
  • You have a passion for a particular subject, or maybe an interesting project to share. How about proposing a webinar or blog post? Contact me if you are interested.
  • If you haven’t yet done it, make 2018 the year you attend Percona Live. If you’ve done it before, do it again – network with old friends and make some new ones. Get a new t-Shirt. Enjoy the company. The warmth of the welcome and the generosity of the knowledge shared made a big impression on me in Dublin, I’m convinced you’ll find the same.
  • In-depth knowledge or hardcore learning on-the-job? Don’t forget that the call for papers for Percona Live is opening soon and that speakers get free attendance at the conference. It’s a competitive call, but you’re up for that right? Right! 
  • Don’t want to “do stuff” on the Percona site? Maybe contributing to code or working on the question-and-answer sites is more for you. Or maybe you have a blog already and write about our software and how to use it. If so – thanks again, and please let me have the link!
  • If you haven’t already, don’t forget to subscribe to our newsletters to get early warning of upcoming webinars, and the latest tech and community news

Have you thought about joining Percona? We’re hiring! Don’t forget, too, that all the contributions you make to online communities – Percona or not – really pay off when you want to demonstrate your knowledge and commitment to future employers or clients. A link is worth a thousand words.

What do you think?

Interested? Ideas or comments? Things you think we should do better? Things that you think are great? Things we used to do that were great and you miss? Things that others do and you wished we did? Things that … well, you get the idea!

Get in touch, or just get stuck in. You might find it rewarding*…

free to email me or message me on Skype.

*I have keys to the swag box … ?

Oct
19
2017
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Percona Blog Poll: How Do You Currently Host Applications and Databases?

Host applications and databases

Host applications and databasesPercona latest blog poll asks how you currently host applications and databases. Select an option below, or leave a comment to clarify your deployment!

With the increased need for environments that respond more quickly to changing business demands, many enterprises are moving to the cloud and hosted deployments for applications and software in order to offload development and maintenance overhead to a third party. The database is no exception. Businesses are turning to using database as a service (DBaaS) to handle their data needs.

DBaaS provides some obvious benefits:

  • Offload physical infrastructure to another vendor. It is the responsibility of whoever is providing the DBaaS service to maintain the physical environment – including hardware, software and best practices.
  • Scalability. You can add or subtract capacity as needed by just contacting your vendor. Have a big event on the horizon? Order more servers!
  • Expense. Since you no longer have shell out for operational costs or infrastructure upgrades (all handled by the vendor now), you can reduce capital and operation expenses – or at least reasonably plan on what they are going to be.

There are some potential disadvantages to a DBaaS as well:

  • Network performance issues. If your database is located off-premises, then it can be subject to network issues (or outages) that are beyond your control. These can translate into performance problems that impact the customer experience.
  • Loss of visibility. It’s harder (though not impossible) to always know what is happening with your data. Decisions around provisioning, storage and architecture are now in the hands of a third party.
  • Security and compliance. You are no longer totally in control of how secure or compliant your data is when using a DBaaS. This can be crucial if your business requires certain standards to operate in your market (healthcare, for example).

How are you hosting your database? On-premises? In the cloud? Which cloud? Is it co-located? Please answer using the poll below. Choose up to three answers. If you don’t see your solutions, use the comments to explain.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

Thanks in advance for your responses – they will help the open source community determine how databases are being hosted.

Oct
03
2017
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Webinar October 4, 2017: Databases in the Hosted Cloud

Databases in the Hosted Cloud 1

Join Percona’s Chief Evangelist, Colin Charles as he presents Databases in the Hosted Cloud on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, at 7:00 am PDT / 10:00 am EDT (UTC-7).Databases in the Hosted Cloud 1


Today you can use hosted MySQL/MariaDB/Percona Server for MySQL/PostgreSQL in several “cloud providers” as a database as a service (DBaaS). Learn the differences, the access methods and the level of control you have for the various public databases in the hosted cloud offerings:

  • Amazon RDS including Aurora
  • Google Cloud SQL
  • Rackspace OpenStack DBaaS
  • Oracle Cloud’s MySQL Service

The administration tools and ideologies behind each are completely different, and you are in a “locked-down” environment. Some considerations include:

  • Different backup strategies
  • Planning for multiple data centers for availability
  • Where do you host your application?
  • How do you get the most performance out of the solution?
  • What does this all cost?
  • Monitoring

Growth topics include:

  • How do you move from one DBaaS to another?
  • How do you move from a DBaaS to your own hosted platform?

Register for the webinar here.

Securing Your MySQLColin Charles, Chief Evangelist

Colin Charles is the Chief Evangelist at Percona. He was previously on the founding team for MariaDB Server in 2009, worked in MySQL since 2005 and been a MySQL user since 2000. Before joining MySQL, he worked actively on the Fedora and OpenOffice.org projects. He’s well known within many open source communities and has spoken on the conference circuit.

 

Sep
21
2017
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Percona Support with Amazon RDS

Amazon RDS

This blog post will give a brief overview of Amazon RDS capabilities and limitations, and how Percona Support can help you succeed in your Amazon RDS deployments.

One of the common questions that we get from customers and prospective customers is about Percona Support with Amazon RDS. As many companies have shifted to the cloud, or are considering how to do so, it’s natural to try to understand the limitations inherent in different deployment strategies.

Why Use Amazon RDS?

As more companies move to using the cloud, we’ve seen a shift towards work models in technical teams that require software developers to take on more operational duties than they have traditionally. This makes it essential to abstract infrastructure so it can be interacted with as code, whether through automation or APIs. Amazon RDS presents a compelling DBaaS product with significant flexibility while maintaining ease of deployment.

Use Cases Where RDS Isn’t a Fit

There are a number of use cases where the inherent limitations of RDS make it not a good fit. With RDS, you are trading off the flexibility to deploy complex environment topologies for the ease of deploying with the push of a button, or a simple API call. RDS eliminates most of the operational overhead of running a database in your environment by abstracting away the physical or virtual hardware and the operating system, networking and replication configuration. This, however, means that you can’t get too fancy with replication, networking or the underlying operating system or hardware.

When Using RDS, Which Engine is Right For Me?

Amazon’s RDS has numerous database engines available, each suited to a specific use case. The three RDS database engines we’ll be discussing briefly here are MySQL, MariaDB and Aurora.

Use MySQL when you have an application tuned for MySQL, you need to use MySQL plug-ins or you wish to maintain compatibility to support external replicas in EC2. MySQL with RDS has support for Memcached, including plug-in support and 5.7 compatible query optimizer improvements. Unfortunately, thread pooling and similar features that are available in Percona Server for MySQL are not currently available in the MySQL engine on RDS.

Use MariaDB when you have an application that requires features available for this engine but not in others. Currently, MariaDB engines in RDS support thread pooling, table elimination, user roles and virtual columns. MySQL or Aurora don’t support these. MariaDB engines in RDS support global transaction IDs (GTIDs), but they are based on the MariaDB implementation. They are not compatible with MySQL GTIDs. This can affect replication or migrations in the future.

Use Aurora when you want a simple-to-setup solution with strong availability guarantees and minimal configuration. This RDS database engine is cloud-native, built with elasticity and the vagaries of running in a distributed infrastructure in mind. While it does limit your configuration and optimization capabilities more than other RDS database engines, it handles a lot of things for you – including ensuring availability. Aurora automatically detects database crashes and restarts without the need for crash recovery or to rebuild the database cache. If the entire instance fails, Aurora automatically fails over to one of up to 15 read replicas.

So If RDS Handles Operations, Why Do I Need Support?

Generally speaking, properly using a database implies four quadrants of tasks. RDS only covers one of these four quadrants: the operational piece. Your existing staff (or another provider such as Percona) must cover each of the remaining quadrants.

Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS

The areas where people run into trouble are slow queries, database performance not meeting expectations or other such issues. In these cases they often can contact Amazon’s support line. The AWS Support Engineers are trained and focused on addressing issues specific to the AWS environment, however. They’re not DBAs and do not have the database expertise necessary to fully troubleshoot your database issues in depth. Often, when an RDS user encounters a performance issue, the first instinct is to increase the size of their AWS deployment because it’s a simple solution. A better path would be investigating performance tuning. More hardware is not necessarily the best solution. You often end up spending far more on your monthly cloud hosting bill than necessary by ignoring unoptimized configurations and queries.

As noted above, when using MariaDB or MySQL RDS database engines you can make use of plug-ins and inject additional configuration options that aren’t available in Aurora. This includes the ability to replicate to external instances, such as in an EC2 environment. This provides more configuration flexibility for performance optimization – but does require expertise to make use of it.

Outside support vendors (like Percona) can still help you even when you eliminate the operational elements by lending the expertise to your technical teams and educating them on tuning and optimization strategies.

Aug
23
2017
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Migrating Data from an Encrypted Amazon MySQL RDS Instance to an Encrypted Amazon Aurora Instance

Migrating Data

Migrating DataIn this blog post, we’ll discuss migrating data from encrypted Amazon MySQL RDS to encrypted Amazon Aurora.

One of my customers wanted to migrate from an encrypted MySQL RDS instance to an encrypted Aurora instance. They have a pretty large database, therefore using mysqldump or a similar tool was not suitable for them. They also wanted to setup replication between old MySQL RDS and new Aurora instances.

Spoiler: this is possible without any logical dump.

At first, I checked Amazon’s documentation on encryption and found nothing about this type of migration. Even more, if I trust the documentation it looks like they don’t support replication or migration between encrypted MySQL RDS and encrypted Aurora. All instructions are for either “MySQL RDS to MySQL RDS” or “Aurora to Aurora” setups. For example, the documentation says here:

You can create Read Replicas of both encrypted and unencrypted DB clusters. The Read Replica must be encrypted if the source DB cluster is encrypted.

When I tried to create an Aurora read replica of my encrypted MySQL RDS instance, however, the “Enable Encryption” select control was grayed out and I could not change “No” to “Yes”.

I had to find a workaround.

Another idea was creating an encrypted MySQL RDS replica and migrating it to Aurora. While creating encrypted MySQL replica is certainly possible (actually all replicas of encrypted instances must be encrypted) it was not possible to migrate it to any other instance using the standard “Migrate Latest Snapshot” option:

However, the documentation specified that Aurora and MySQL RDS use the same AWS KMS key. As a result, both kinds of encryption should be compatible (if not practically the same). Amazon also has the “AWS Database Migration Service“, which has this promising section in its FAQ:

Q. Can I replicate data from encrypted data sources?

Yes, AWS Database Migration Service can read and write from and to encrypted databases. AWS Database Migration Service connects to your database endpoints on the SQL interface layer. If you use the Transparent Data Encryption features of Oracle or SQL Server, AWS Database Migration Service will be able to extract decrypted data from such sources and replicate it to the target. The same applies to storage-level encryption. As long as AWS Database Migration Service has the correct credentials to the database source, it will be able to connect to the source and propagate data (in decrypted form) to the target. We recommend using encryption-at-rest on the target to maintain the confidentiality of your information. If you use application-level encryption, the data will be transmitted through AWS Database Migration Service as is, in encrypted format, and then inserted into the target database.

I decided to give it a try. And it worked!

The next step was to make this newly migrated Aurora encrypted instance a read replica of the original MySQL RDS instance. This is easy in part with the help of great how-to on migration by Adrian Cantrill. As suggested, you only need to find the master’s binary log file, current position and supply them to the stored routine

mysql.rds_set_external_master

. Then start replication using the stored routine

mysql.rds_start_replication

.

Conclusion: While AWS Database Migration Service has limitations for both source and target databases, this solution allows you to migrate encrypted instances easily and securely.

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Aug
09
2017
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How to Configure Aurora RDS Parameters

Aurora RDS Parameters

Aurora RDS ParametersIn this blog post, we’ll look at some tips on how to configure Aurora RDS parameters.

I was recently deploying a few Aurora RDS instances, a process very similar to configuring a regular RDS instance. I noticed a few minor differences in the way you configure Aurora RDS parameters, and very few articles on how the commands should be structured (for RDS as well as Aurora). The only real literature available is the official Amazon RDS documentation.

This blog provides a concise “how-to” guide to quickly change Aurora RDS parameters using the AWS CLI. Aurora retains the parameter group model introduced with RDS, with new instances having the default read only parameter groups. For a new instance, you need to create and allocate a new parameter group (this requires a DB reboot). After that, you can apply changes to dynamic variables immediately. In other words, the first time you add the DB parameter group you’ll need to reboot even if the variable you are configuring is dynamic. It’s best to create a new DB parameter group when initializing your clusters. Nothing stops you from adding more than one host to the same DB Parameter Group rather than creating one per instance.

In addition to the DB Parameter Group, each instance is also allocated a DB Cluster Parameter Group. The DB Parameter Group is used for instance-level parameters, while the DB Cluster Parameter Group is used for cluster-level parameters (and applies to all instances in a cluster). You’ll find some of the MySQL engine variables can only be found in the DB Cluster Parameter Group. Here you will find a handy reference of all the DB cluster and DB instance parameters that are viewable or configurable for Aurora instances.

To run these commands, you’ll need to have the “aws” cli tool installed and configured. Note that the force-failover option used for RDS instances doesn’t apply to Aurora. You should perform either a controlled failover or let Aurora handle this. Also, the group family to use for Aurora is “oscar5.6”. The commands to set this up are as follows:

aws rds create-db-parameter-group
    --db-parameter-group-name percona-opt
    --db-parameter-group-family oscar5.6
    --description "Percona Optimizations"
aws rds modify-db-parameter-group
    --db-parameter-group-name percona-opt
    --parameters "ParameterName=max_connections,ParameterValue=5000,ApplyMethod=immediate"
# For each instance-name:
aws rds modify-db-instance --db-instance-identifier <instance-name>
    --db-parameter-group-name=percona-opt
aws rds reboot-db-instance
    --db-instance-identifier <instance-name>

Once you create the initial DB parameter group, configure the variables as follows:

aws rds modify-db-parameter-group
    --db-parameter-group-name <instance-name>
    --parameters "ParameterName=max_connect_errors,ParameterValue=999999,ApplyMethod=immediate"
aws rds modify-db-parameter-group
    --db-parameter-group-name <instance-name>
    --parameters "ParameterName=max_connect_errors,ParameterValue=999999,ApplyMethod=immediate"
## Verifying change:
aws rds describe-db-parameters
      --db-parameter-group-name aurora-instance-1
      | grep -B7 -A2 'max_connect_errors'

Please keep in mind, it can take a few seconds to propagate changes to nodes. Give it a moment before checking the values with “show global variables”. You can configure the DB Cluster Parameter group similarly, for example:

# Create a new db cluster parameter group
aws rds create-db-cluster-parameter-group --db-cluster-parameter-group-name percona-cluster --db-parameter-group-family oscar5.6 --description "new cluster group"
# Tune a variable on the db cluster parameter group
aws rds modify-db-cluster-parameter-group --db-cluster-parameter-group-name percona-cluster --parameters "ParameterName=innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit,ParameterValue=2,ApplyMethod=immediate"
# Allocate the new db cluster parameter to your cluster
aws rds modify-db-cluster --db-cluster-identifier <cluster_identifier> --db-cluster-parameter-group-name=percona-cluster
# And of course, for viewing the cluster parameters
aws rds describe-db-cluster-parameters --db-cluster-parameter-group-name=percona-cluster

I hope you find this article useful, please make sure to share with the community!

Jun
16
2017
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Peter Zaitsev’s Speaking Schedule: Percona University Belgium / PG Day / Meetups

Peter Zaitsev Speaking Schedule

This blog shows Peter Zaitsev’s speaking schedule for this summer.

Summer 2017 Speaking Engagements

This week I spoke at the DB Tech Showcase OSS conference in Japan and am now heading to Europe. I have a busy schedule in June and early July, but there are events and places where we can cross paths and have a quick conversation. Let’s meet at these events if you need anything from Percona (or me personally). 

Below is a full list of places I’ll be at this summer:

Amsterdam, Netherlands

On June 20 I am speaking at the In-Memory Computing Summit 2017 with Denis Magda (Product Manager, Gridgain Systems). Our talk “Accelerate MySQL® for Demanding OLAP and OLTP Use Cases with Apache® Ignite™” starts at 2:35 pm.

On the same day in Amsterdam, Denis and I will speak at the local MySQL User Group meetupI will share some how-tos for MySQL monitoring with Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM), along with a PMM demo.

Ghent, Belgium

On June 22 we are organizing a Percona University event in Ghent, Belgium, which is a widely known tech hub in the region. I will give several talks there on MySQL, MongoDB and PMM monitoring. Dimitri Vanoverbeke from Percona will discuss MySQL in the Cloud. We have also invited guest speakers: Frederic Descamps from Oracle, and Julien Pivotto from Inuits.

Percona University technical events are 100% free to attend, and so far we are getting very positive attendee feedback on them. To check the full agenda for the Belgium edition, and to register, please use this link.

St. Petersburg, Russia

Percona is sponsoring PG Day’17 Russia, the PostgreSQL conference. This year they added a track on open source databases (and I was happy to be their Committee member for the OSDB track). The conference starts on July 5, and on that day I will give a tutorial on InnoDB Architecture and Performance Optimization. Sveta Smirnova will also present a tutorial on MySQL Performance Troubleshooting.

On July 6-7, you can expect four more talks given by Perconians at PG Day. We invite you to stop by our booth (“Percona”) and ask us any tough questions you might have.

Moscow, Russia

On July 11 I will speak at a Moscow MySQL User Group meetup at the Mail.Ru Group office. While we’re still locking down the agenda, we always have a great selection of speakers at the MMUG meetups. Make sure you don’t miss this gathering!

Thank you, and I hope to see many of you at these events.

Jun
09
2017
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Q & A: MySQL In the Cloud – Migration, Best Practices, High Availability, Scaling

MySQL in the Cloud

MySQL in the CloudIn this blog, we will provide answers to the Q & A for the MySQL In the Cloud: Migration, Best Practices, High Availability, Scaling webinar.

First, we want to thank everybody for attending the June 7, 2017 webinar. The recording and slides for the webinar are available here. Below is the list of your questions that we were unable to answer during the webinar:

How does Percona XtraDB cluster work with AWS for MySQL clustering?

Percona XtraDB Cluster works especially well in cloud environments, including Amazon EC2. Since Percona XtraDB Cluster only requires one network round trip per transaction for write transactions commits, and keeps all reads local, allows it to deploy high performance multi AZ and even multi region clusters. The fact that each Percona XtraDB Cluster node contains all the data allows it to avoid reliance on the EBS storage. You can run Percona XtraDB Cluster on NVMe storage based i3 EC2 nodes to achieve high performance even with very IO-intensive workloads. Automatic provisioning and cluster self healing allows you to easily scale the cluster. We have simple tutorial on how to deploy Percona XtraDB Cluster on AWS – check it out here.

How do you approach master-master model? Are there enough reasons to use the model to implement multi-site scaling?

There are two distinct multi-master modes in existence. A synchronous Master-Master solution, like the one offered by Percona XtraDB Cluster (virtually synchronous to be exact), guarantees there are no data conflicts as you connect to the nodes located at different sites. The downside of this model is that writes can be expensive. As such, it works well in environments with low latency between the different sites, or when high latency for updates can be tolerated. Percona XtraDB Cluster is greatly optimized in that it requires only one network roundtrip to complete a commit transaction. This significantly reduces the added latency compared to many other solutions.

In contrast, asynchronous Master-Master means you can perform writes locally, without waiting on a network round trip.  It comes with the downside of possible data conflicts. In MySQL, it can be implemented using MySQL Replication. MySQL Replication only detects conflicts at this point, however, and stops if it detects a conflict. It has no good built-in conflict resolution. Ensuring conflicts do not happen on the application level is hard and error prone, and only recommended in rare cases. Most applications out there do not use Active Master-Master, but rather design an architecture where each database replication set operates with a only a single writable node.

Do the Percona tools work in the cloud, like in Amazon Aurora?

We try to make Percona software in the cloud when it makes sense. For example, Percona Toolkit and Percona Monitoring Management support Amazon RDS and Amazon Aurora. Percona XtraBackup does not, as it requires physical access to the database files (Amazon RDS and Aurora don’t provide that).  Having said that, Amazon recently updated its Aurora migration documentation to include the use of XtraBackup. Amazon Aurora supports backups taken by Percona XtraBackup as a way to import data.

What is the fastest way to verify and validate backups created by XtraBackup for databases around 2-3TB?

In the big picture, you test backups by doing some sort of restore and validation. This can be done manually, but is much better if automated. There are three levels of such validation:

  • Basic Validation. Run –apply-log and ensure it completes successfully. Start the MySQL instance and run some basic queries to ensure it works. Often running some queries to see that recent data is present is a good idea.  
  • Consistency Validation.  Additionally, run Check Table on all tables to ensure there is no corruption. This way, tables and indexes data structures are validated.   
  • Full Validation. Restore the backup and connect the restored backup as a MySQL slave (possibly to one of the existing slaves). Let it catch up and then run pt-table-checksum to validate consistency and ensure that the data in backup matches what is in the source.

Running a checktable on databases on AWS IO optimized instances takes up to eight hours. Any other suggestions on how to replace checktable in validation?”

Without knowing the table size, it is hard for me to assess whether eight hours is reasonable for your environment. However, generally speaking you should not run a Full Validation on every backup. Full Validation first and foremost validates the backup and restore pipeline. If you’re not seeing issues, doing it once per month is plenty. You want to do lighter checks on a daily and weekly basis. 

What approach would you recommend for a data warehouse needing about 80,000IOPS, currently on FusionIO bare metal? Which cloud solution would be my best bet?

This is complicated question. To answer it properly requires more information. We need to know what type of operations your database performs. Working with a Percona Consultant to do an A&D for your environment would give you best answer. In general though, EBS (even with a large number of provisioned IOPs) would not match FusionIO in IO request latency. I3 high IO instances with NVMe storage is closer match. If budget is not a concern, you can look into X1 instances. These can have up to 2TB of memory and often allow getting all (or a large portion) of the database in memory for even higher performance.

Thanks for attending the MySQL In the Cloud: Migration, Best Practices, High Availability, Scaling webinar! Post any more MySQL in the cloud comments below.

Jun
05
2017
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Webinar June 7, 2017: MySQL In the Cloud – Migration, Best Practices, High Availability, Scaling

MySQL in the Cloud

MySQL in the CloudJoin Percona’s CEO and Founder Peter Zaitsev as he presents MySQL In the Cloud: Migration, Best Practices, High Availability, Scaling on Wednesday, June 7, 2017, at 10 am PDT / 1:00 pm EDT (UTC-7).

Businesses are moving many of the systems and processes they once owned to offsite “service” models: Platform as a Service (PaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), etc. These services are usually referred to as being “in the cloud” – meaning that the infrastructure and management of the service in question are not maintained by the enterprise using the service.

When it comes to database environment and infrastructure, more and more enterprises are moving to MySQL in the cloud to manage this vital part of their business organization. We often refer to database services provided in the cloud as Database as a Service (DBaaS). The next question after deciding to move your database to the cloud is “How to I plan properly to as to avoid a disaster?”

Before moving to the cloud, it is important to carefully define your database needs, plan for the migration and understand what putting a solution into production entails. This webinar discusses the following subjects on moving to the cloud:

  • Public and private cloud
  • Migration to the cloud
  • Best practices
  • High availability
  • Scaling

Register for the webinar here.

Peter ZaitsevPeter Zaitsev, Percona CEO and Founder

Peter Zaitsev co-founded Percona and assumed the role of CEO in 2006. As one of the foremost experts on MySQL strategy and optimization, Peter leveraged both his technical vision and entrepreneurial skills to grow Percona from a two-person shop to one of the most respected open source companies in the business. With over 150 professionals in 20+ countries, Peter’s venture now serves over 3000 customers – including the “who’s who” of internet giants, large enterprises and many exciting startups. Percona was named to the Inc. 5000 in 2013, 2014 and 2015.

Peter was an early employee at MySQL AB, eventually leading the company’s High Performance Group. A serial entrepreneur, Peter co-founded his first startup while attending Moscow State University where he majored in Computer Science. Peter is a co-author of High Performance MySQL: Optimization, Backups, and Replication, one of the most popular books on MySQL performance. Peter frequently speaks as an expert lecturer at MySQL and related conferences, and regularly posts on the Percona Database Performance Blog. Fortune and DZone often tap Peter as a contributor, and his recent ebook Practical MySQL Performance Optimization is one of percona.com’s most popular downloads.

May
16
2017
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Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2017 Slides and Videos Available

Percona Live

Percona LiveThe slides and videos from the Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2017 are available for viewing and download. The videos and slides cover the keynotes, breakout sessions and MySQL and MongoDB 101 sessions.

To view slides, go to the Percona Live agenda, and select the talk you want slides for from the schedule, and click through to the talk web page. The slides are available below the talk description. There is also a page with all the slides that is searchable by topic, talk title, speaker, company or keywords.

To view videos, go to the Percona Live 2017 video page. The available videos are searchable by topic, talk title, speaker, company or keywords.

There are a few slides and videos outstanding due to unforeseen circumstances. However, we will upload those as they become available.

Some examples of videos and slide decks from the Percona Live conference:

MongoDB 101: Efficient CRUD Queries in MongoDB
Adamo Tonete, Senior Technical Engineer, Percona
Video: https://www.percona.com/live/17/content/efficient-crud-queries-mongodb
Slides: https://www.percona.com/live/17/sessions/efficient-crud-queries-mongodb

MySQL 101: Choosing a MySQL High Availability Solution
Marcos Albe, Principal Technical Services Engineer, Percona
Video: https://www.percona.com/live/17/content/choosing-mysql-high-availability-solution
Slides: https://www.percona.com/live/17/sessions/choosing-mysql-high-availability-solution

Breakout Session: Using the MySQL Document Store
Mike Zinner, Sr. Software Development Director and Alfredo Kojima, Sr. Software Development Manager, Oracle
Video: https://www.percona.com/live/17/content/using-mysql-document-store
Slides: https://www.percona.com/live/17/sessions/using-mysql-document-store

Keynote: Continuent is Back! But What Does Continuent Do Anyway?
Eero Teerikorpi, Founder and CEO and MC Brown, VP Products, Continuent
Video: https://www.percona.com/live/17/content/continuent-back-what-does-continuent-do-anyway
Slides: https://www.percona.com/live/17/sessions/continuent-back-what-does-continuent-do-anyway

Please let us know if you have any issues. Enjoy the videos!

Percona Live Europe 2017
Percona Live Europe 2017: Dublin, Ireland!

This year’s Percona Live Europe will take place September 25th-27th, 2017, in Dublin, Ireland. Put it on your calendar now! Information on speakers, talks, sponsorship and registration will be available in the coming months.

We have developed multiple sponsorship options to allow participation at a level that best meets your partnering needs. Our goal is to create a significant opportunity for our partners to interact with Percona customers, other partners and community members. Sponsorship opportunities are available for Percona Live Europe 2017.

Download a prospectus here.

We look forward to seeing you there!

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