May
03
2018
--

Datadog provides visibility into Kubernetes apps with new container map

As companies turn increasingly to containerization, it creates challenges in terms of monitoring each individual container and the impact on the underlying application. This is particularly difficult because of the ephemeral nature of containers, which can exist for a very short time. Datadog introduced a container map product today that could help by bringing visualization to bear on the problem.

“With his announcement, what we are doing is introducing a container map to show you all of the containers across your system,” Ilan Rabinovitch, VP of Product Management at Datadog told TechCrunch. This could enable customers to see every container at any given time, organize them into groups based on tags, then drill-down to see what’s happening within each one.

The company makes use of tags and metadata to identify the different parts of the containers and their relationship to one another and the underlying infrastructure. The tool monitors containers much like any other entity in Datadog.

“Just as the host map does with individual instances, the container map enables you to easily group, filter, and inspect your containers using metadata such as services, availability zones, roles, partitions, or any other dimension you like,” the company wrote in a blog post introducing the new feature.

While Datadog won’t help a company directly remediate a problem as it avoids having write access to a company’s systems, the customer can use Web hooks or a serverless trigger like an Amazon Lambda function to invoke some sort of action should certain conditions be met that could compromise or break the application.

The company is simply acting as a third party watching to make sure the containers all behave properly. “We trust Kubernetes to do what it should do. But when something breaks, you need to be able to understand what happened, and Kubernetes is not designed to do this,” Rabinovitch said. The new map features provides that missing visibility into the container system and lets users drill down inside individual containers to pinpoint the source of a problem.

Apr
21
2018
--

Through luck and grit, Datadog is fusing the culture of developers and operations

There used to be two cultures in the enterprise around technology. On one side were software engineers, who built out the applications needed by employees to conduct the business of their companies. On the other side were sysadmins, who were territorially protective of their hardware domain — the servers, switches, and storage boxes needed to power all of that software. Many a great comedy routine has been made at the interface of those two cultures, but they remained divergent.

That is, until the cloud changed everything. Suddenly, there was increasing overlap in the skills required for software engineering and operations, as well as a greater need for collaboration between the two sides to effectively deploy applications. Yet, while these two halves eventually became one whole, the software monitoring tools used by them were often entirely separate.

New York City-based Datadog was designed to bring these two cultures together to create a more nimble and collaborative software and operations culture. Founded in 2010 by Olivier Pomel and Alexis Lê-Quôc, the product offers monitoring and analytics for cloud-based workflows, allowing ops team to track and analyze deployments and developers to instrument their applications. Pomel said that “the root of all of this collaboration is to make sure that everyone has the same understanding of the problem.”

The company has had dizzying success. Pomel declined to disclose precise numbers, but says the company had “north of $100 million” of recurring revenue in the past twelve months, and “we have been doubling that every year so far.” The company, headquartered in the New York Times Building in Times Square, employs more than 600 people across its various worldwide offices. The company has raised nearly $150 million of venture capital according to Crunchbase, and is perennially on banker’s short lists for strong IPO prospects.

The real story though is just how much luck and happenstance can help put wind in the sails of a company.

Pomel first met Lê-Quôc while an undergraduate in France. He was working on running the campus network, and helped to discover that Lê-Quôc had hacked the network. Lê-Quôc was eventually disconnected, and Pomel would migrate to IBM’s upstate New York offices after graduation. After IBM, he led technology at Wireless Generation, a K-12 startup, where he ran into Lê-Quôc again, who was heading up ops for the company. The two cultures of develops and ops was glaring at the startup, where “we had developers who hated operations” and there was much “finger-pointing.”

Putting aside any lingering grievances from their undergrad days, the two began to explore how they could ameliorate the cultural differences they witnessed between their respective teams. “Bringing dev and ops together is not a feature, it is core,” Pomel explained. At the same time, they noticed that companies were increasingly talking about building on Amazon Web Services, which in 2009, was still a relatively new concept. They incorporated Datadog in 2010 as a cloud-first monitoring solution, and launched general availability for the product in 2012.

Luck didn’t just bring the founders together twice, it also defined the currents of their market. Datadog was among the first cloud-native monitoring solutions, and the superlative success of cloud infrastructure in penetrating the enterprise the past few years has benefitted the company enormously. We had “exactly the right product at the right time,” Pomel said, and “a lot of it was luck.” He continued, “It’s healthy to recognize that not everything comes from your genius, because what works once doesn’t always work a second time.”

While startups have been a feature in New York for decades, enterprise infrastructure was in many ways in a dark age when the company launched, which made early fundraising difficult. “None of the West Coast investors were listening,” Pomel said, and “East Coast investors didn’t understand the infrastructure space well enough to take risks.” Even when he could get a West Coast VC to chat with him, they “thought it was a form of mental impairment to start an infrastructure startup in New York.”

Those fundraising difficulties ended up proving a boon for Datadog, because it forced the company to connect with customers much earlier and more often than it might have otherwise. Pomel said, “it forced us to spend all of our time with customers and people who were related to the problem” and ultimately, “it grounded us in the customer problem.” Pomel believes that the company’s early DNA of deeply listening to customers has allowed it to continue to outcompete its rivals on the West Coast.

More success is likely to come as companies continue to move their infrastructure onto the cloud. Datadog used to have a roughly even mix of private and public cloud business, and now the balance is moving increasingly toward the public side. Even large financial institutions, which have been reticent in transitioning their infrastructures, have now started to aggressively embrace cloud as the future of computing in the industry, according to Pomel.

Datadog intends to continue to add new modules to its core monitoring toolkit and expand its team. As the company has grown, so has the need to put in place more processes as parts of the company break. Quoting his co-founder, Pomel said the message to employees is “don’t mind the rattling sound — it is a spaceship, not an airliner” and “things are going to break and change, and it is normal.”

Much as Datadog has bridged the gap between developers and ops, Pomel hopes to continue to give back to the New York startup ecosystem by bridging the gap between technical startups and venture capital. He has made a series of angel investments into local emerging enterprise and data startups, including Generable, Seva, and Windmill. Hard work and a lot of luck is propelling Datadog into the top echelon of enterprise startups, pulling New York along with it.

Jan
12
2016
--

Investors Feed Datadog A Hefty $94.5 Million Round

Silly Morkie puppy sticking out his tongue while laying in a pile of one hundred dollar bills. Every startup needs a steady diet of funding to keep it strong and growing. Datadog, a monitoring service that helps customers bring together data from across a variety of infrastructure and software is no exception.
Today it announced a massive $94.5 million Series D Round. The company would not discuss valuation.
The round was led by ICONIQ Capital. Existing investors Index Ventures… Read More

Jan
28
2015
--

Investors Throw Datadog A $31M Bone

Dog holding two one hundred dollar bills in its mouth like a bone. Datadog, a cloud service that helps customers monitor infrastructure and software, whether all in the cloud or a hybrid on-premises-cloud environment, announced $31M in Series C funding today. The round was led by Index Ventures with help from RTP Ventures, OpenView Venture Partners and what they referred to as “other equity holders.” Index and OpenView helped fund the Series… Read More

Powered by WordPress | Theme: Aeros 2.0 by TheBuckmaker.com