Oct
11
2018
--

Percona Live 2019 – Save the Date!

Austin Texas

Austin State Capitol

After much speculation following the announcement in Santa Clara earlier this year, we are delighted to announce Percona Live 2019 will be taking place in Austin, Texas.

Save the dates in your diary for May, 28-30 2019!

The conference will take place just after Memorial Day at The Hyatt Regency, Austin on the shores of Lady Bird Lake.

This is also an ideal central location for those who wish to extend their stay and explore what Austin has to offer! Call for papers, ticket sales and sponsorship opportunities will be announced soon, so stay tuned!

In other Percona Live news, we’re less than 4 weeks away from this year’s European conference taking place in Frankfurt, Germany on 5-7 November. The tutorials and breakout sessions have been announced, and you can view the full schedule here. Tickets are still on sale so don’t miss out, book yours here today!

 

Oct
10
2018
--

Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) 1.15.0 Is Now Available

Percona Monitoring and Management

Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) is a free and open-source platform for managing and monitoring MySQL® and MongoDB® performance. You can run PMM in your own environment for maximum security and reliability. It provides thorough time-based analysis for MySQL® and MongoDB® servers to ensure that your data works as efficiently as possible.

Percona Monitoring and Management

This release offers two new features for both the MySQL Community and Percona Customers:

  • MySQL Custom Queries – Turn a SELECT into a dashboard!
  • Server and Client logs – Collect troubleshooting logs for Percona Support

We addressed 17 new features and improvements, and fixed 17 bugs.

MySQL Custom Queries

In 1.15 we are introducing the ability to take a SQL SELECT statement and turn the result set into metric series in PMM.  The queries are executed at the LOW RESOLUTION level, which by default is every 60 seconds.  A key advantage is that you can extend PMM to profile metrics unique to your environment (see users table example), or to introduce support for a table that isn’t part of PMM yet. This feature is on by default and only requires that you edit the configuration file and use vaild YAML syntax.  The configuration file is in /usr/local/percona/pmm-client/queries-mysqld.yml.

Example – Application users table

We’re going to take a fictional MySQL users table that also tracks the number of upvotes and downvotes, and we’ll convert this into two metric series, with a set of seven labels, where each label can also store a value.

Browsing metrics series using Advanced Data Exploration Dashboard

Lets look at the output so we understand the goal – take data from a MySQL table and store in PMM, then display as a metric series.  Using the Advanced Data Exploration Dashboard you can review your metric series. Exploring the metric series  app1_users_metrics_downvotes we see the following:

PMM Advanced Data Exploration Dashboard

MySQL table

Lets assume you have the following users table that includes true/false, string, and integer types.

SELECT * FROM `users`
+----+------+--------------+-----------+------------+-----------+---------------------+--------+---------+-----------+
| id | app  | user_type    | last_name | first_name | logged_in | active_subscription | banned | upvotes | downvotes |
+----+------+--------------+-----------+------------+-----------+---------------------+--------+---------+-----------+
|  1 | app2 | unprivileged | Marley    | Bob        |         1 |                   1 |      0 |     100 |        25 |
|  2 | app3 | moderator    | Young     | Neil       |         1 |                   1 |      1 |     150 |        10 |
|  3 | app4 | unprivileged | OConnor   | Sinead     |         1 |                   1 |      0 |      25 |        50 |
|  4 | app1 | unprivileged | Yorke     | Thom       |         0 |                   1 |      0 |     100 |       100 |
|  5 | app5 | admin        | Buckley   | Jeff       |         1 |                   1 |      0 |     175 |         0 |
+----+------+--------------+-----------+------------+-----------+---------------------+--------+---------+-----------+

Explaining the YAML syntax

We’ll go through a simple example and mention what’s required for each line.  The metric series is constructed based on the first line and appends the column name to form metric series.  Therefore the number of metric series per table will be the count of columns that are of type GAUGE or COUNTER.  This metric series will be called app1_users_metrics_downvotes:

app1_users_metrics:                                 ## leading section of your metric series.
  query: "SELECT * FROM app1.users"                 ## Your query. Don't forget the schema name.
  metrics:                                          ## Required line to start the list of metric items
    - downvotes:                                    ## Name of the column returned by the query. Will be appended to the metric series.
        usage: "COUNTER"                            ## Column value type.  COUNTER will make this a metric series.
        description: "Number of upvotes"            ## Helpful description of the column.

Full queries-mysqld.yml example

Each column in the SELECT is named in this example, but that isn’t required, you can use a SELECT * as well.  Notice the format of schema.table for the query is included.

---
app1_users_metrics:
  query: "SELECT app,first_name,last_name,logged_in,active_subscription,banned,upvotes,downvotes FROM app1.users"
  metrics:
    - app:
        usage: "LABEL"
        description: "Name of the Application"
    - user_type:
        usage: "LABEL"
        description: "User's privilege level within the Application"
    - first_name:
        usage: "LABEL"
        description: "User's First Name"
    - last_name:
        usage: "LABEL"
        description: "User's Last Name"
    - logged_in:
        usage: "LABEL"
        description: "User's logged in or out status"
    - active_subscription:
        usage: "LABEL"
        description: "Whether User has an active subscription or not"
    - banned:
        usage: "LABEL"
        description: "Whether user is banned or not"
    - upvotes:
        usage: "COUNTER"
        description: "Count of upvotes the User has earned.  Upvotes once granted cannot be revoked, so the number can only increase."
    - downvotes:
        usage: "GAUGE"
        description: "Count of downvotes the User has earned.  Downvotes can be revoked so the number can increase as well as decrease."
...

We hope you enjoy this feature, and we welcome your feedback via the Percona forums!

Server and Client logs

We’ve enhanced the volume of data collected from both the Server and Client perspectives.  Each service provides a set of files designed to be shared with Percona Support while you work on an issue.

Server

From the Server, we’ve improved the logs.zip service to include:

  • Prometheus targets
  • Consul nodes, QAN API instances
  • Amazon RDS and Aurora instances
  • Version
  • Server configuration
  • Percona Toolkit commands

You retrieve the link from your PMM server using this format:   https://pmmdemo.percona.com/managed/logs.zip

Client

On the Client side we’ve added a new action called summary which fetches logs, network, and Percona Toolkit output in order to share with Percona Support. To initiate a Client side collection, execute:

pmm-admin summary

The output will be a file you can use to attach to your Support ticket.  The single file will look something like this:

summary__2018_10_10_16_20_00.tar.gz

New Features and Improvements

  • PMM-2913 – Provide ability to execute Custom Queries against MySQL – Credit to wrouesnel for the framework of this feature in wrouesnel/postgres_exporter!
  • PMM-2904 – Improve PMM Server Diagnostics for Support
  • PMM-2860 – Improve pmm-client Diagnostics for Support
  • PMM-1754Provide functionality to easily select query and copy it to clipboard in QAN
  • PMM-1855Add swap to AMI
  • PMM-3013Rename PXC Overview graph Sequence numbers of transactions to IST Progress
  • PMM-2726 – Abort data collection in Exporters based on Prometheus Timeout – MySQLd Exporter
  • PMM-3003 – PostgreSQL Overview Dashboard Tooltip fixes
  • PMM-2936Some improvements for Query Analytics Settings screen
  • PMM-3029PostgreSQL Dashboard Improvements

Fixed Bugs

  • PMM-2976Upgrading to PMM 1.14.x fails if dashboards from Grafana 4.x are present on an installation
  • PMM-2969rds_exporter becomes throttled by CloudWatch API
  • PMM-1443The credentials for a secured server are exposed without explicit request
  • PMM-3006Monitoring over 1000 instances is displayed imperfectly on the label
  • PMM-3011PMM’s default MongoDB DSN is localhost, which is not resolved to IPv4 on modern systems
  • PMM-2211Bad display when using old range in QAN
  • PMM-1664Infinite loading with wrong queryID
  • PMM-2715Since pmm-client-1.9.0, pmm-admin detects CentOS/RHEL 6 installations using linux-upstart as service manager and ignores SysV scripts
  • PMM-2839Tablestats safety precaution does not work for RDS/Aurora instances
  • PMM-2845pmm-admin purge causes client to panic
  • PMM-2968pmm-admin list shows empty data source column for mysql:metrics
  • PMM-3043 Total Time percentage is incorrectly shown as a decimal fraction
  • PMM-3082Prometheus Scrape Interval Variance chart doesn’t display data

How to get PMM Server

PMM is available for installation using three methods:

Help us improve our software quality by reporting any Percona Monitoring and Management bugs you encounter using our bug tracking system.

Oct
09
2018
--

PostgreSQL Monitoring: Set Up an Enterprise-Grade Server (and Sign Up for Webinar Weds 10/10…)

PostgreSQL Monitoring

PostgreSQL logoThis is the last post in our series on building an enterprise-grade PostgreSQL set up using open source tools, and we’ll be covering monitoring.

The previous posts in this series discussed aspects such as security, backup strategy, high availability, connection pooling and load balancing, extensions, and detailed logging in PostgreSQL. Tomorrow, Wednesday, October 10 at 10AM EST, we will be reviewing these topics together, and showcasing then in practice in a webinar format: we hope you can join us!

 

Monitoring databases

The importance of monitoring the activity and health of production systems is unquestionable. When it comes to the database, with its high number of customizable settings, the ability to track its various metrics (status counters and gauges) allows for the maintenance of a historical record of its performance over time. This can be used for capacity planningtroubleshooting and validation.

When it comes to capacity planning, a monitoring solution is a helpful tool to help you assess how the current setup is faring. At the same time, it can help predict future needs based on trends, such as the increase of active connections, queries, and CPU usage. For example, an increase in CPU usage might be due to a genuine increase in workload, but it could also be a sign of unoptimized queries growing in popularity. In which case, comparing CPU with disk access might provide a more complete view of what is going on.

Being able to easily correlate data like this helps you to catch minor issues and to plan accordingly, sometimes allowing you to avoid an easier but more costly solution of scaling up to mitigate problems like this. But having the right monitoring solution is really invaluable when it comes to investigative work and root cause analysis. Trying to understand a problem that has already taken place is a rather complicated, and often unenviable, task unless you established a continuous, watchful eye on the set up for the whole time.

Finally, a monitoring solution can help you validate changes made in the business logic in general or in the database configuration in specific. By comparing prior and post results for a given metric or for overall performance, you can observe the impact of such changes in practice.

Monitoring PostgreSQL with open source solutions

There is a number of monitoring solutions for PostgreSQL and postgresql.org’s Wiki provides an extensive list, albeit a little outdated. It categorizes the main monitoring solutions into two distinct categories: those that can be identified as generic solutions—and can be extended to cover different technologies through custom plugins—and those labeled as Postgres-centric, which are specific to PostgreSQL.

In the first group, we find venerated open source monitoring tools such as Munin, Zabbix, and CactiNagios could have also been added to this group but it was instead indirectly included in the “Checkers” group. That category includes monitoring scripts that can be used both in stand-alone mode or as feeders (plugins) for “Nagios like software“. Examples of these are check_pgactivity and check_postgres.

One omission from this list is Grafana, a modern time series analytics platform conceived to display metrics from a number of different data sources. Grafana includes a solution packaged as a PostgreSQL native plugin. Percona has built its Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) platform around Grafana, using Prometheus as its data source. Since version 1.14.0, PMM supports PostgreSQL. Query Analytics (QAN) integration is coming soon.

An important factor that all these generic solutions have in common is that they are widely used for the monitoring of a diverse collection of services, like you’d normally find in enterprise-like environments. It’s common for a given company to adopt one, or sometimes two, such solutions with the aim of monitoring their entire infrastructure. This infrastructure often includes a heterogeneous combination of databases and application servers.

Nevertheless, there is a place for complementary Postgres-centric monitoring solutions in such enterprise environments too. These solutions are usually implemented with a specific goal in mind. Two examples we can mention in this context are PGObserver, which has a focus on monitoring stored procedures, and pgCluu, with its focus on auditing.

Monitoring PostgreSQL with PMM

We built an enterprise-grade PostgreSQL set up for the webinar, and use PMM for monitoring. We will be showcasing some of PMM’s main features, and highlighting some of the most important metrics to watch, during our demo.You may want to have a look at this demo setup to get a feel of how our PostgreSQL Overview dashboard looks:

You can find instructions on how to setup PMM for monitoring your PostgreSQL server in our documentation space. And if there’s still time, sign up for tomorrow’s webinar!

 

Oct
03
2018
--

Percona Live Europe 2018 Session Programme Published

PLE 2018 Full Agenda Announced

PLE 2018 Full Agenda AnnouncedOffering over 110 conference sessions across Tuesday, 6 and Wednesday, 7 November, and a full tutorial day on Monday 5 November, we hope you’ll find that this fantastic line up of talks for Percona Live Europe 2018 to be one of our best yet! Innovation in technology continues to arrive at an accelerated rate, and you’ll find plenty to help you connect with the latest developments in open source database technologies at this acclaimed annual event.

Representatives from companies at the leading edge of our industry use the platform offered by Percona Live to showcase their latest developments and share plans for the future. If your career is dependent upon the use of open source database technologies you should not miss this conference!

Conference Session Schedule

Conference sessions will take place on Tuesday and Wednesday, November 6-7 and will feature more than 110 in-depth talks by industry experts. Conference session examples include:

  • Deep Dive on MySQL Databases on Amazon RDS – Chayan Biswas, AWS
  • MySQL 8.0 Performance: Scalability & Benchmarks – Dimitri Kravtchuk, Oracle
  • MySQL 8 New Features: Temptable engine – Pep Pla, Pythian
  • Artificial Intelligence Database Performance Tuning – Roel Van de Paar, Percona
  • pg_chameleon – MySQL to PostgreSQL replica made easy – Federico Campoli, Loxodata
  • Highway to Hell or Stairway to Cloud? – Alexander Kukushkin, Zalando
  • Zero to Serverless in 60 Seconds – Sandor Maurice, AWS
  • A Year in Google Cloud – Carmen Mason, Alan Mason, Vital Source Technologies
  • Advanced MySQL Data at Rest Encryption in Percona Server for MySQL – Iwo Panowicz, Percona, and Bart?omiej Ole?, Severalnines
  • Monitoring Kubernetes with Prometheus – Henri Dubois-Ferriere, Sysdig
  • How We Use and Improve Percona XtraBackup at Alibaba Cloud – Bo Wang, Alibaba Cloud
  • Shard 101 – Adamo Tonete, Percona
  • Top 10 Mistakes When Migrating From Oracle to PostgreSQL – Jim Mlodgenski, AWS
  • Explaining the Postgres Query Optimizer – Bruce Momjian, EnterpriseDB
  • MariaDB 10.3 Optimizer and Beyond – Vicentiu Ciorbaru, MariaDB FoundationHA and Clustering Solution: ProxySQL as an Intelligent Router for Galera and Group Replication – René Cannaò, ProxySQL
  • MongoDB WiredTiger WriteConflicts – Paul Agombin, ObjectRocket
  • PostgreSQL Enterprise Features – Michael Banck, credativ GmbH
  • What’s New in MySQL 8.0 Security – Georgi Kodinov, Oracle
  • The MariaDB Foundation and Security – Finding and Fixing Vulnerabilities the Open Source Way – Otto Kekäläinen, MariaDB Foundation
  • ClickHouse 2018: How to Stop Waiting for Your Queries to Complete and Start Having Fun – Alexander Zaitsev, Altinity
  • Open Source Databases and Non-Volatile Memory – Frank Ober, Intel Memory Group
  • MyRocks Production Case Studies at Facebook – Yoshinori Matsunobu, Facebook
  • Need for Speed: Boosting Apache Cassandra’s Performance Using Netty – Dinesh Joshi, Apache Cassandra
  • Demystifying MySQL Replication Crash Safety – Jean-François Gagné, Messagebird

See the full list of sessions

Tutorial schedule

Tutorials will take place throughout the day on Monday, November 5, 2018. Tutorial session examples include:

  • Query Optimization with MySQL 8.0 and MariaDB 10.3: The Basics – Jaime Crespo, Wikimedia Foundation
  • ElasticSearch 101 – Antonios Giannopoulos, ObjectRocket
  • MySQL InnoDB Cluster in a Nutshell: The Saga Continues with 8.0 – Frédéric Descamps, Oracle
  • High Availability PostgreSQL and Kubernetes with Google Cloud – Alexis Guajardo, Google
  • Best Practices for High Availability – Alex Rubin and Alex Poritskiy, Percona

See the full list of tutorials.

Sponsors

We are grateful for the support of our sponsors:

  • Platinum – AWS
  • Silver – Altinity, PingCap
  • Start Up – Severalnines
  • Branding – Intel, Idera
  • Expo – Postgres EU

If you would like to join them Sponsorship opportunities for Percona Live Open Source Database Conference Europe 2018 are available and offer the opportunity to interact with the DBAs, sysadmins, developers, CTOs, CEOs, business managers, technology evangelists, solution vendors and entrepreneurs who typically attend the event. Contact live@percona.com for sponsorship details.

Ready to register? What are you waiting for? Costs will only get higher!
Register now!

 

 

Oct
03
2018
--

Percona Blog Poll: How Do You Run Your Database in the Cloud?

Cloud database poll

Cloud database pollPercona’s latest blog poll asks how you run your database in the cloud?

Join in!

Are you using a fully managed service or are you self-managing your databases in the cloud? And what provider are you relying on? Perhaps you’re using more than one. Don’t worry, you can tick multiple boxes, so please choose up to four answers. If you don’t see your solution listed, use the comments box on this blog to feedback your thoughts.

If you’d like to, you’re also welcome leave a comment to tell us about your choice—or maybe why you’re NOT planning on moving to a cloud solution in the near future. Likewise if you want to share how you’ve found your cloud deployment so far, feel free to send a comment. Thanks!

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

The post Percona Blog Poll: How Do You Run Your Database in the Cloud? appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Oct
02
2018
--

CRITICAL UPDATE for Percona XtraDB Cluster users: 5.7.23-31.31.2 Is Now Available

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7

High AvailabilityTo resolve a critical regression, Percona announces the release of Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.23-31.31.2 on October 2, 2018 Binaries are available from the downloads section or from our software repositories.

This release resolves a critical regression in the upstream wsrep library and supersedes 5.7.23-31.31

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.23-31.31.2 is now the current release, based on the following:

All Percona software is open-source and free.

Fixed Bugs

  • #2254: A cluster conflict could cause a crash in Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.23 if autocommit=off.

Help us improve our software quality by reporting any bugs you encounter using our bug tracking system. As always, thanks for your continued support of Percona!

The post CRITICAL UPDATE for Percona XtraDB Cluster users: 5.7.23-31.31.2 Is Now Available appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Sep
28
2018
--

This Week in Data with Colin Charles #54: Percona Server for MySQL is Alpha

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

I consider this to be the biggest news for the week: Alpha Build of Percona Server for MySQL 8.0. Experiment with it in a Docker container. It is missing column compression with dictionary support, native partitioning for TokuDB and MyRocks (excited to see that this is coming!), and encryption key rotation and scrubbing. All in, this should be a fun release to try, test, and also to file bugs for!

Database paradigms are changing, and it is interesting to see Cloudflare introducing Workers KV a key-value store, that is eventually consistent and highly distributed (at their global network of 152+ data centers). You can have up to 1 billion keys per namespace, keys up to 2kB in size, values up to 64kB, and eventual global consistency within 10 seconds. Read more about the cost and other technicals too.

For some quick glossing, from a MySQL Federal Account Manager, comes Why MySQL is Harder to Sell Than Oracle (from someone who has done both). Valid concerns, and always interesting to hear the barriers MySQL faces even after 23 years in existence! For analytics, maybe this is where the likes of MariaDB ColumnStore or ClickHouse might come into play.

Lastly, for all of you asking me about when Percona Live Europe Frankfurt 2018 speaker acceptances and agendas are to be released, I am told by a good source that it will be announced early next week. So register already!

Releases

Link List

Upcoming Appearances

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via Twitter @bytebot.

The post This Week in Data with Colin Charles #54: Percona Server for MySQL is Alpha appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Sep
27
2018
--

Announcement: Alpha Build of Percona Server 8.0

Percona Server for MySQL

Percona server for MySQLAlpha Build of Percona Server 8.0 released

An alpha version of Percona Server 8.0 is now available in the Percona experimental software repositories. This is a 64-bit release only. 

You may experiment with this alpha release by running it in a Docker container:

$ docker run -d -e MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD=password -p 3306:3306 perconalab/percona-server:8.0.12.alpha

When the container starts, connect to it as follows:

$ docker exec -ti $(docker ps | grep -F percona-server:8.0.12.alpha | awk '{print $1}') mysql -uroot -ppassword

Note that this release is not ready for use in any production environment.

Percona Server 8.0 alpha is available for the following platforms:

  • RHEL/Centos 6.x
  • RHEL/Centos 7.x
  • Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial
  • Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic
  • Debian 8 Jessie
  • Debian 9 Stretch

Note: The list of supported platforms may be different in the GA release.

Fixed Bugs:

  • PS-4814: TokuDB ‘fast’ replace into is incompatible with 8.0 row replication
  • PS-4834: The encrypted system tablespace has empty uuid

Other fixed bugs: PS-4788PS-4631PS-4736, PS-4818PS-4755

Unfinished Features

The following features are work in progress and are not yet in a working state:

  • Column compression with Data Dictionaries
  • Native Partitioning for TokuDB and for MyRocks
  • Encryption
    • Key Rotation
    • Scrubbing

Known Issues

  • PS-4788: Setting log_slow_verbosity and enabling the slow_query_log could lead to a server crash
  • PS-4803: ALTER TABLE … ADD INDEX … LOCK crash | handle_fatal_signal (sig=11) in dd_table_has_instant_cols
  • PS-4896: handle_fatal_signal (sig=11) in THD::thread_id likely due to enabling innodb_print_lock_wait_timeout_info
  • PS-4820: PS crashes with keyring_vault encryption
  • PS-4796: 8.0 DD and atomic DDL breaks DROP DATABASE for engines that store files in database directory
  • PS-4898: Crash during PAM authentication plugin installation.
  • PS-1782: Optimizer chooses wrong plan when joining 2 tables
  • PS-4850: Toku hot backup plugin dumps tons of info to stdout with no way to disable it
  • PS-4797: rpl.rpl_master_errors failing, likely due to binlog encryption
  • PS-4800: Recovery of prepared XA transactions seems broken in 8.0
  • PS-4853: Installing audit_log plugin causes server to crash
  • PS-4855: Replace http with https in http://bugs.percona.com in server crash messages
  • PS-4857: Improve error message handling for compressed columns
  • PS-4895: Improve error message when encrypted system tablespace was started without keyring plugin
  • PS-3944: Single variable to control logging in QRT
  • PS-4705: crash on snapshot size check in RocksDB
  • PS-4885: Using ALTER … ROW_FORMAT=TOKUDB_QUICKLZ leads to InnoDB: Assertion failure: ha_innodb.cc:12198:m_form->s->row_type == m_create_info->row_type

The post Announcement: Alpha Build of Percona Server 8.0 appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Sep
27
2018
--

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4.17-2.15 Is Now Available

Percona Server for MongoDB

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4Percona announces the release of Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4.17-2.15 on September 27, 2018. Download the latest version from the Percona website or the Percona Software Repositories.

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4 is an enhanced, open source, and highly-scalable database that is a fully-compatible, drop-in replacement for MongoDB 3.4 Community Edition. It supports MongoDB 3.4 protocols and drivers.

Percona Server for MongoDB extends MongoDB Community Edition functionality by including the Percona Memory Engine and MongoRocks storage engines, as well as several enterprise-grade features:

Percona Server for MongoDB requires no changes to MongoDB applications or code.

This release is based on MongoDB 3.4.17. There are no additional improvements or new features on top of those upstream fixes.

The post Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4.17-2.15 Is Now Available appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Sep
26
2018
--

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.23-31.31 Is Now Available

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.23-31.31 on September 26, 2018. Binaries are available from the downloads section or from our software repositories.

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.23-31.31 is now the current release, based on the following:

Deprecated

The following variables are deprecated starting from this release:

This variable, which defines whether locking sessions should be converted to transactions, is deprecated in Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.23-31.31 because it is rarely used in practice.

Fixed Bugs

  • PXC-1017: Memcached access to InnoDB was not replicated by Galera.
  • PXC-2164: The SST script prevented SELinux from being enabled.
  • PXC-2155wsrep_sst_xtrabackup-v2 did not delete all folders on cleanup.
  • PXC-2160: In some cases, the MySQL version was not detected correctly with the Xtrabackup-v2 method of SST (State Snapshot Transfer).
  • PXC-2199: When the DROP TRIGGER IF EXISTS statement was run for a not existing trigger, the node GTID was incremented instead of the cluster GTID.
  • PXC-2209: The compression dictionary was not replicated in PXC.
  • PXC-2202: In some cases, a disconnected cluster node was not shut down.
  • PXC-2165: SST could fail if either wsrep_node_address or wsrep_sst_receive_address were not specified.
  • PXC-2213: NULL/VOID DDL transactions could commit in a wrong order.

Help us improve our software quality by reporting any bugs you encounter using our bug tracking system. As always, thanks for your continued support of Percona!

 

The post Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.23-31.31 Is Now Available appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

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