Apr
20
2018
--

The Final Countdown: Are You Ready for Percona Live 2018?

Are you ready for Percona Live

Are you ready for Percona Live 2018It’s hard to believe Percona Live 2018 starts on Monday! We’re looking forward to seeing everyone in Santa Clara next week! Here are some quick highlights to remember:

  • In addition to all the amazing sessions and keynotes we’ve announced, we’ll be hosting the MySQL Community Awards and the Lightning Talks on Monday during the Opening Reception.
  • We’ve also got a great lineup of demos in the exhibit hall all day Tuesday and Wednesday – be sure to stop by and learn more about open source database products and tools.
  • On Monday, we have a special China Track now available from Alibaba Cloud, PingCAP and Shannon Systems. We’ve just put a $20.00 ticket on sale for that track, and if you have already purchased any of our other tickets, you are also welcome to attend those four sessions.
  • Don’t forget to make your reservation at the Community Dinner. It’s a great opportunity to socialize with everyone and Pythian is always a wonderful host!

Thanks to everyone who is sponsoring, presenting and attending! The community is who makes this event successful and so much fun to be a part of!

The post The Final Countdown: Are You Ready for Percona Live 2018? appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Apr
16
2018
--

Binlog and Replication Improvements in Percona Server for MySQL

Percona Server for MySQL

Percona Server for MySQLDue to continuous development and improvement, Percona Server for MySQL incorporates a number of improvements related to binary log handling and replication. This results in replication specifics, distinguishing it from MySQL Server.

Temporary tables and mixed logging format

Summary of the fix:

As soon as some statement involving temporary tables was met when using a mixed binlog format, MySQL switched to row-based logging for all statements until the end of the session (or until all temporary tables used in the session were dropped). This is inconvenient when you have long-lasting connections, including replication-related ones. Percona Server for MySQL fixes the situation by switching between statement-based and row-based logging when necessary.

Details:

The new mixed binary logging format, supported by Percona Server for MySQL, means that the server runs in statement-based logging by default, but switches to row-based logging when replication would be unpredictable. For example, in the case of a nondeterministic SQL statement that could cause data divergence if reproduced on a slave server. The switch is done when matching any condition from a long list, and one of these conditions is the use of temporary tables.

Temporary tables are never logged using row-based format, but any statement that touches a temporary table is logged in row mode. This way, we intercept all the side effects that temporary tables can produce on non-temporary ones.

There is no need to use the row logging format for any other statements, solely because of the temp table presence. However, MySQL undertook such an excessive precaution: once some statement with a temporary table had appeared and the row-based logging was used, MySQL was logging unconditionally put all subsequent statements in row format.

Percona Server for MySQL has implemented more accurate behavior. Instead of switching to row-based logging until the last temporary table is closed, the usual rules of row vs. statement format apply, and we don’t consider the presence of currently opened temporary tables. This change was introduced with the fix of bug #151 (upstream #72475).

Temporary table drops and binloging on GTID-enabled server

Summary of the fix:

MySQL logs DROP statements for all temporary tables regardless of the logging mode under which these tables were created. This produces binlog writes and errand GTIDs on slaves with row and mixed logging. Percona Server for MySQL fixes this by tracking the binlog format at temporary table create time and uses it to decide whether a DROP should be logged or not.

Details:

Even with read_only mode enabled, the server permits some operations, including ones with temporary tables. With the previous fix, temporary table operations are not binlogged in row- or mixed-mode. But MySQL server doesn’t track what the logging mode was when a temporary table was created, and therefore unconditionally logs DROP statements for all temporary tables. These DROP statements receive IF EXISTS addition, which is intended to make them harmless.

Percona Server for MySQL has fixed this with the bug fixes #964, upstream #83003, and upstream #85258. Moreover, with all the binlogging fixes discussed so far nothing involving temporary tables is logged to the binary log in row or mixed format. There is no need to consider CREATE/DROP TEMPORARY TABLE unsafe for use in stored functions, triggers and multi-statement transactions in row/mixed format. Therefore, we introduced an additional fix to mark the creation and drop of temporary tables as unsafe inside transactions in statement-based replication only (the fixed bug is #1816, while the correspondent upstream one is #89467 and it is still open).

Safety of statements with a LIMIT clause

Summary of the fix:

MySQL Server considers all UPDATE/DELETE/INSERT ... SELECT statements with the LIMIT clause unsafe, no matter if they are really producing non-deterministic results or not. Percona Server for MySQL is more accurate because it acknowledges such instructions as safe when they include ORDER BY PK or WHERE condition.

Details:

MySQL Server treats UPDATE/DELETE/INSERT ... SELECT statements with the LIMIT clause as unsafe, considering that they produce an unpredictable number of rows. But some such statements can still produce an absolutely predictable result. One such deterministic case takes place when a statement with the LIMIT clause has an ORDER BY PK or WHERE condition.

The patch, making updates and deletes with a limit to be supposed as safe if they have an ORDER BY pk_column clause, was initially provided on the upstream bug report and incorporated later into Percona Server for MySQL with additional improvements. Bug fixed #44 (upstream #42415).

Performance improvements

There are also two modifications in Percona Server related to multi-source replication that improve performance on slaves.

The first improvement is about relay log position, which was always updated in multi-source replications setups regardless of whether the committed transaction has already been executed or not. Percona Server omits relay log position updates for the already logged GTIDs.

These unconditional relay log position updates caused additional fsync operations in the case of relay-log-info-repository=TABLE. With the higher number of channels transmitting such duplicate (already executed) transactions, the situation became proportionally worse. The problem was solved in Percona Server 5.7.18-14.  Bug fixed  #1786 (upstream #85141).

The second improvement decreases the load on slave nodes configured to update the master status and connection information only on log file rotation. MySQL additionally updated this information in the case of multi-source replication when a slave had to skip the already executed GTID event. This behavior was the cause of substantially higher write loads on slaves and lower replication throughput.

The configuration with master_info_repository=TABLE and sync_master_info=0  makes the slave update the master status and connection information in this table on log file rotation and not after each sync_master_info event, but it didn’t work on multi-source replication setups. Heartbeats sent to the slave to skip GTID events that it had already executed previously were evaluated as relay log rotation events and reacted with mysql.slave_master_info table sync. This inaccuracy could produce a huge (up to five times on some setups) increase in write load on the slave, before this problem was fixed in Percona Server for MySQL 5.7.20-19. Bug fixed  #1812 (upstream #85158).

Current status of fixes

The three issues related to temporary tables that were fixed in Percona Server 5.5 and contributed upstream, and the final fixes of the bugs #72475, #83003, and #85258, have landed into MySQL Server 8.0.4.

The post Binlog and Replication Improvements in Percona Server for MySQL appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Apr
13
2018
--

This Week in Data with Colin Charles 35: Percona Live 18 final countdown and a roundup of recent news

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

Percona Live is just over a week away — there’s an awesome keynote lineup, and you really should register. Also don’t forget to save the date as Percona Live goes to Frankfurt, Germany November 5-7 2018! Prost!

In acquisitions, we have seen MariaDB acquire MammothDB and Idera acquire Webyog.

Some interesting Amazon notes: Amazon Aurora Continues its Torrid Growth, More than Doubling the Number of Active Customers in the Last Year (not sure I’d describe it as torrid but this is great for MySQL and PostgreSQL), comes with a handful of customer mentions. In addition, there have already been 65,000 database migrations on AWS. For context, in late November 2017, it was 40,000 database migrations.

Releases

Link List

Upcoming appearances

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

 

The post This Week in Data with Colin Charles 35: Percona Live 18 final countdown and a roundup of recent news appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Apr
12
2018
--

Flashback: Another Take on Point-In-Time Recovery (PITR) in MySQL/MariaDB/Percona Server

Point-In-Time Recovery

Point-In-Time RecoveryIn this blog post, I’ll look at point-in-time recovery (PITR) options for MySQL, MariaDB and Percona Server for MySQL.

It is a common good practice to extend data safety by having additional measures apart from regular data backups, such as delayed slaves and binary log backups. These two options provide the ability to restore the data to any given point in time, or just revert from some bad accidents. These methods have their limitations of course: delayed slaves only help if a deadly mistake is noticed fast enough, while full point-in-time recovery (PITR) requires the last full backup and binary logs (and therefore usually takes a lot of time).

How to reverse from disaster faster

Alibaba engineers and the MariaDB team implemented an interesting feature in their version of the mysqlbinlog tool: the --flashback option. Based on ROW-based DML events, it can transform the binary log and reverse purposes. That means it can help undo given row changes extremely fast. For instance, it can change DELETE events to INSERTs and vice versa, and it will swap WHERE and SET parts of the UPDATE events. This simple idea can dramatically speed up recovery from certain types of mistakes or disasters.

The question is whether it works with non-MariaDB variants. To verify that, I tested this feature with the latest available Percona Server for MySQL 5.7 (which is fully compatible with upstream MySQL).

master [localhost] {msandbox} ((none)) > select @@version,@@version_comment;
+---------------+--------------------------------------------------------+
| @@version     | @@version_comment                                      |
+---------------+--------------------------------------------------------+
| 5.7.21-20-log | Percona Server (GPL), Release 20, Revision ed217b06ca3 |
+---------------+--------------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

First, let’s simulate one possible deadly scenario: a forgotten WHERE in DELETE statement:

master [localhost] {msandbox} ((none)) > select count(*) from test.sbtest1;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 200      |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
master [localhost] {msandbox} ((none)) > delete from test.sbtest1;
Query OK, 200 rows affected (0.04 sec)
slave1 [localhost] {msandbox} ((none)) > select count(*) from test.sbtest1;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 0        |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec

So, our data is lost on both the master and slave!

Let’s start by downloading the latest MariaDB server 10.2.x package, which I’m hoping has a mysqlbinlog tool that works with MySQL 5.7, and unpack it to some custom location:

$ dpkg -x mariadb-server-10.2_10.2.13+maria~wheezy_amd64.deb /opt/maria/
$ /opt/maria/usr/bin/mysqlbinlog --help|grep flash
-B, --flashback Flashback feature can rollback you committed data to a

It has the function we are looking for. Now, we have to find the culprit transaction or set of transactions we want to revert. A simplified example may look like this:

$ mysqlbinlog -v --base64-output=DECODE-ROWS mysql-bin.000002 > mysql-bin.000002.sql
$ less mysql-bin.000002.sql

By searching through the decoded binary log, we are looking for transactions that have wiped out the table test.sbtest1. It looks like this (as the table had 200 rows, it is pretty long, so I’ve pasting only the beginning and the end):

BEGIN
/*!*/;
# at 291
#180314 15:30:34 server id 1  end_log_pos 348 CRC32 0x06cd193e  Table_map: `test`.`sbtest1` mapped to number 111
# at 348
#180314 15:30:34 server id 1  end_log_pos 8510 CRC32 0x064634c5         Delete_rows: table id 111
...
### DELETE FROM `test`.`sbtest1`
### WHERE
###   @1=200
###   @2=101
###   @3='26157116088-21551255803-13077038767-89418462090-07321921109-99464656338-95996554805-68102077806-88247356874-53904987561'
###   @4='51157774706-69740598871-18633441857-39587481216-98251863874'
# at 38323
#180314 15:30:34 server id 1  end_log_pos 38354 CRC32 0x6dbb7127        Xid = 97
COMMIT/*!*/;

It is very important to take the proper start and stop positions. We need the ones exactly after BEGIN and before the final COMMIT. Then, let’s test if the tool produces the reverse statements as expected. First, decode the rows to the .sql file:

$ /opt/maria/usr/bin/mysqlbinlog --flashback -v --base64-output=DECODE-ROWS --start-position=291 --stop-position=38323 mysql-bin.000002 > mysql-bin.000002_flash.sql

Inside, we find 200 of those. Looks good:

### INSERT INTO `test`.`sbtest1`
### SET
### @1=200
...

Since we verified the positions are correct, we can prepare a binary log file:

$ /opt/maria/usr/bin/mysqlbinlog --flashback --start-position=291 --stop-position=38323 mysql-bin.000002 > mysql-bin.000002_flash.bin

and load it back to our master:

master [localhost] {msandbox} (test) > source mysql-bin.000002_flash.bin
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Query OK, 0 rows affected, 1 warning (0.00 sec)
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.04 sec)
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
master [localhost] {msandbox} (test) > select count(*) from test.sbtest1;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 200      |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

and double check they restored on slaves:

slave1 [localhost] {msandbox} (test) > select count(*) from test.sbtest1;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 200      |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

GTID problem

MariaDB has a completely different GTID implementation from MySQL and Percona Server. You can expect problems when decoding incompatible GTID enabled binary logs with MariaDB. As MariaDB’s mysqlbinlog does not support –start/stop-gtid options (even for its own implementation), we have to take the usual positions anyway. From a GTID-enabled binary log, for example, delete can look like this:

# at 2300
#180315 9:37:31 server id 1 end_log_pos 2365 CRC32 0x09e4d815 GTID last_committed=1 sequence_number=2 rbr_only=yes
/*!50718 SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ COMMITTED*//*!*/;
SET @@SESSION.GTID_NEXT= '00020996-1111-1111-1111-111111111111:2'/*!*/;
# at 2365
#180315 9:37:31 server id 1 end_log_pos 2433 CRC32 0xac62a20d Query thread_id=4 exec_time=0 error_code=0
SET TIMESTAMP=1521103051/*!*/;
BEGIN
/*!*/;
# at 2433
#180315 9:37:31 server id 1 end_log_pos 2490 CRC32 0x275601d6 Table_map: `test`.`sbtest1` mapped to number 108
# at 2490
#180315 9:37:31 server id 1 end_log_pos 10652 CRC32 0xe369e169 Delete_rows: table id 108
...
# at 42355
#180315 9:37:31 server id 1 end_log_pos 42386 CRC32 0xe01ff558 Xid = 31
COMMIT/*!*/;
SET @@SESSION.GTID_NEXT= 'AUTOMATIC' /* added by mysqlbinlog */ /*!*/;

The tool seems to work, and transforms the delete transaction to a sequence of INSERTs. However, the server rejects it when we try to load it on a GTID-enabled master:

master [localhost] {msandbox} ((none)) > source mysql-bin.000003.flash
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Query OK, 0 rows affected, 1 warning (0.00 sec)
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
ERROR 1782 (HY000): @@SESSION.GTID_NEXT cannot be set to ANONYMOUS when @@GLOBAL.GTID_MODE = ON.
ERROR 1782 (HY000): @@SESSION.GTID_NEXT cannot be set to ANONYMOUS when @@GLOBAL.GTID_MODE = ON.
ERROR 1782 (HY000): @@SESSION.GTID_NEXT cannot be set to ANONYMOUS when @@GLOBAL.GTID_MODE = ON.
ERROR 1782 (HY000): @@SESSION.GTID_NEXT cannot be set to ANONYMOUS when @@GLOBAL.GTID_MODE = ON.
ERROR 1782 (HY000): @@SESSION.GTID_NEXT cannot be set to ANONYMOUS when @@GLOBAL.GTID_MODE = ON.
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
Query OK, 0 rows affected, 1 warning (0.00 sec)
master [localhost] {msandbox} ((none)) > select count(*) from test.sbtest1;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 0 |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

Unfortunately, the solution here is either to disable GTID mode for the recovery time (which is surely tricky in replicated clusters), or try to add GTID-related information to the resulting binary log with the

--flashback option

. In my case, adding these lines worked (I used the next free available GTID sequence):

$ diff -u mysql-bin.000003.flash mysql-bin.000003.flash.gtid
--- mysql-bin.000003.flash 2018-03-15 10:20:20.080487998 +0100
+++ mysql-bin.000003.flash.gtid 2018-03-15 10:25:02.909953620 +0100
@@ -4,6 +4,10 @@
DELIMITER /*!*/;
#180315 9:32:51 server id 1 end_log_pos 123 CRC32 0x941b189a Start: binlog v 4, server v 5.7.21-20-log created 180315 9:32:51 at startup
ROLLBACK/*!*/;
+# at 154
+#180315 9:37:05 server id 1 end_log_pos 219 CRC32 0x69e4ce26 GTID last_committed=0 sequence_number=1 rbr_only=yes
+/*!50718 SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ COMMITTED*//*!*/;
+SET @@SESSION.GTID_NEXT= '00020996-1111-1111-1111-111111111111:5'/*!*/;
BINLOG '
sy+qWg8BAAAAdwAAAHsAAAAAAAQANS43LjIxLTIwLWxvZwAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAACzL6paEzgNAAgAEgAEBAQEEgAAXwAEGggAAAAICAgCAAAACgoKKioAEjQA
@@ -724,6 +728,7 @@
'/*!*/;
COMMIT
/*!*/;
+SET @@SESSION.GTID_NEXT= 'AUTOMATIC' /* added by mysqlbinlog */ /*!*/;
DELIMITER ;
# End of log file
ROLLBACK /* added by mysqlbinlog */;

master [localhost] {msandbox} ((none)) > source mysql-bin.000003.flash.gtid
(...)
master [localhost] {msandbox} ((none)) > select count(*) from test.sbtest1;
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
| 200      |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec

Limitations

Obviously, flashback cannot help after DROP/TRUNCATE or other DDL commands. These are not transactional, and affected rows are never recorded in the binary log. It doesn’t work with encrypted or compressed binary logs either. But most importantly, to produce complete events that can reverse bad transactions, the binary format must be ROW. The row image also must be FULL:

master [localhost] {msandbox} ((none)) > select @@binlog_format,@@binlog_row_image;
+-----------------+--------------------+
| @@binlog_format | @@binlog_row_image |
+-----------------+--------------------+
| ROW             | FULL               |
+-----------------+--------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

If these conditions are not met (or if you’re dealing with a too-complicated GTID issue), you will have to follow the standard point-in-time recovery procedure.

The post Flashback: Another Take on Point-In-Time Recovery (PITR) in MySQL/MariaDB/Percona Server appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Apr
11
2018
--

Calling All Polyglots: Percona Live 2018 Keynote Schedule Now Available!

Percona Live 2018 Keynotes

Percona Live 2018 KeynotesWe’ve posted the Percona Live 2018 keynote addresses for the seventh annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018, taking place April 23-25, 2018 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. 

This year’s keynotes explore topics ranging from how cloud and open source database adoption accelerates business growth, to leading-edge emerging technologies, to the importance of MySQL 8.0, to the growing popularity of PostgreSQL.

We’re excited by the great lineup of speakers, including our friends at Alibaba Cloud, Grafana, Microsoft, Oracle, Upwork and VividCortex, the innovative leaders on the Cool Technologies panel, and Brendan Gregg from Netflix, who will discuss how to get the most out of your database on a Linux OS, using his experiences at Netflix to highlight examples.  

With the theme of “Championing Open Source Databases,” the conference will feature multiple tracks, including MySQL, MongoDB, Cloud, PostgreSQL, Containers and Automation, Monitoring and Ops, and Database Security. Once again, Percona will be offering a low-cost database 101 track for beginning users who want to learn how to use and operate open source databases.

The Percona Live 2018 keynotes include:

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

  • Open Source for the Modern Business – Peter Zaitsev of Percona will discuss how open source database adoption continues to grow in enterprise organizations, the expectations and definitions of what constitutes success continue to change. A single technology for everything is no longer an option; welcome to the polyglot world. The talk will include several compelling open source projects and trends of interest to the open source database community and will be followed by a round of lightning talks taking a closer look at some of those projects.
  • Cool Technologies Showcase – Four industry leaders will introduce key emerging industry developments. Andy Pavlo of Carnegie Mellon University will discuss the requirements for enabling autonomous database optimizations. Nikolay Samokhvalov of PostgreSQL.org will discuss new PostgreSQL tools. Sugu Sougoumarane of PlanetScale Data will explore how Vitess became a high-performance, scalable and available MySQL clustering cloud solution in line with today’s NewSQL storage systems. Shuhao Wu of Shopify explains how to use Ghostferry as a data migration tool for incompatible cloud platforms.
  • State of the Dolphin 8.0 – Tomas Ulin of Oracle will discuss the focus, strategy, investments and innovations that are evolving MySQL to power next-generation web, mobile, cloud and embedded applications – and why MySQL 8.0 is the most significant MySQL release in its history.
  • Linux Performance 2018 – Brendan Gregg of Netflix will summarize recent performance features to help users get the most out of their Linux systems, whether they are databases or application servers. Topics include the KPTI patches for Meltdown, eBPF for performance observability, Kyber for disk I/O scheduling, BBR for TCP congestion control, and more.

Wednesday, April 25, 2018

  • Panel Discussion: Database Evolution in the Cloud – An expert panel of industry leaders, including Lixun Peng of Alibaba, Sunil Kamath of Microsoft, and Baron Schwartz of VividCortex, will discuss the rapid changes occurring with databases deployed in the cloud and what that means for the future of databases, management and monitoring and the role of the DBA and developer.
  • Future Perfect: The New Shape of the Data Tier – Baron Schwartz of VividCortex will discuss the impact of macro trends such as cloud computing, microservices, containerization, and serverless applications. He will explore where these trends are headed, touching on topics such as whether we are about to see basic administrative tasks become more automated, the role of open source and free software, and whether databases as we know them today are headed for extinction.
  • MongoDB at Upwork – Scott Simpson of Upwork, the largest freelancing website for connecting clients and freelancers, will discuss how MongoDB is used at Upwork, how the company chose the database, and how Percona helps make the company successful.

We will also present the Percona Live 2018 Community Awards and Lightning Talks on Monday, April 23, 2018, during the Opening Night Reception. Don’t miss the first day of tutorials and Opening Night Reception!

Register for the conference on the Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018 website.

Sponsorships

Limited Sponsorship opportunities for Percona Live 2018 Open Source Database Conference are still available, and offer the opportunity to interact with the DBAs, sysadmins, developers, CTOs, CEOs, business managers, technology evangelists, solution vendors, and entrepreneurs who typically attend the event. Contact live@percona.com for sponsorship details.

  • Diamond Sponsors – Percona, VividCortex
  • Platinum – Alibaba Cloud, Microsoft
  • Gold Sponsors – Facebook, Grafana
  • Bronze Sponsors – Altinity, BlazingDB, Box, Dynimize, ObjectRocket, Pingcap, Shannon Systems, SolarWinds, TimescaleDB, TwinDB, Yelp
  • Contributing Sponsors – cPanel, Github, Google Cloud, NaviCat
  • Media Sponsors – Database Trends & Applications, Datanami, EnterpriseTech, HPCWire, ODBMS.org, Packt

The post Calling All Polyglots: Percona Live 2018 Keynote Schedule Now Available! appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Apr
05
2018
--

Percona Live Europe 2018 – Save the Date!

Percona Live Europe 2018

Percona Live Europe 2018We’ve been searching for a great venue for Percona Live Europe 2018, and I am thrilled to announce we’ll be hosting it in Frankfurt, Germany! Please block November 5-7, 2018 on your calendar now and plan to join us at the Radisson Blu Frankfurt for the premier open source database conference.

We’re in the final days of organizing for the Percona Live 2018 in Santa Clara. You can still purchase tickets for an amazing lineup of keynote speakers, tutorials and sessions. We have ten tracks, including MySQL, MongoDB, Cloud, PostgreSQL, Containers and Automation, Monitoring and Ops, and Database Security. Major areas of focus at the conference will include:

  • Database operations and automation at scale, featuring speakers from Facebook, Slack, Github and more
  • Databases in the cloud – how database-as-a-service (DBaaS) is changing the DB landscape, featuring speakers from AWS, Microsoft, Alibaba and more
  • Security and compliance – how GDPR and other government regulations are changing the way we manage databases, featuring speakers from Fastly, Facebook, Pythian, Percona and more
  • Bridging the gap between developers and DBAs – finding common ground, featuring speakers from Square, Oracle, Percona and more

The Call for Papers for Percona Live Europe will open soon. We look forward to seeing you in Santa Clara!

The post Percona Live Europe 2018 – Save the Date! appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Mar
27
2018
--

MariaDB acquires big analytics company MammothDB

MariaDB is best known as a drop-in replacement for the popular MySQL database. But the MariaDB Corporation, which was founded by MySQL founder Monty Widenius and which offers all of its software under an open source license, clearly has its sights set on a bigger market and is looking to expand and better challenge the likes of Oracle, the company today announced that it has acquired MammothDB, a big data business analytics service based in Bulgaria.

With MariaDB AX, MariaDB already offers an analytics and data warehousing system. The service launched in 2017 and, unsurprisingly, the company plans to bring the MammothDB’s expertise in this area to bear on MariaDB AX.

“The MammothDB team joins MariaDB at a critical point in our growth, bringing with them an impressive track record of delivering big data solutions,” said MariaDB CEO Michael Howard. “Over the past year, we’ve seen a major increase in demand for MariaDB AX as organizations seek to fill an open source analytics gap left by proprietary offerings such as Oracle and Teradata. The addition of MammothDB’s deep analytics expertise will be invaluable to helping MariaDB meet this growing need and continue to innovate our analytic products.”

The companies did not disclose the price of the acquisition. MammothDB raised a $1.8 million seed round led by 3TS Capital Partners and Empower Capital in 2015 but it doesn’t look like the company ever raised any additional funding. MariaDB, on the other hand, closed a $54 million Series C round led by Alibaba Group and the European Investment Bank in late 2017, which was surely a factor in being able to make today’s acquisition.

Mar
16
2018
--

This Week in Data with Colin Charles 32: Stack Overflow Developer Survey, SCALE16x and Interesting MySQL 8 Version Numbers

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

SCALE16x is over. Percona had a large showing — both Peter Zaitsev & myself had talks, and the booth in the expo hall saw Rick Golba, Marc Sherwood, and Dave Avery also pop by. The lead scanner suggests we had several hundred conversations ? — read Dave Avery’s summary. My talk went well, though during Q&A the number of questions I got about MariaDB Server was quite interesting (considering it wasn’t part of my talk!). It is clear people are concerned about compatibility (because I spent close to 45 minutes after my talk answering Q&A outside too).

I got to catch up with Dave Stokes and asked him why there were version numbers being skipped in MySQL 8 (as noted in last week’s column). Now there’s a blog post explaining it: MySQL 8.0: It Goes to 11!. It has to do with version number alignment across the product line.

This week we saw something cool come out of Stack Overflow: their Developer Survey Results 2018. There were over 100,000 developers participating in this survey, a marked increase from 2017 when they only had 64,000.

About 66,264 respondents answered the question about what databases they use. MySQL is by far the most popular with 58.7% of the respondents saying they use it. This is followed by PostgreSQL getting 32.9%, MongoDB getting 25.9%, and MariaDB 13.4%. I’m surprised that Amazon RDS/Aurora got 5.1%. In 2017, the first year they introduced the database component, only 29,452 respondents participated, with 55.6% using MySQL, 26.5% using PostgreSQL, and 21% using MongoDB (MariaDB was not broken out last year).

When it came to the most “loved/dread/wanted” databases, apparently 62% of respondents loved PostgreSQL, with 58.8% loving Amazon RDS/Aurora, 55.1% MongoDB, 53.3% MariaDB Server, and 48.7% only loving MySQL. In terms of dread, 51.3% dread MySQL, while only 46.7% dread MariaDB; MongoDB has 44.9% dreading it, and PostgreSQL only 38%. As for the most wanted databases? 18.6% for MongoDB, 11.4% for PostgreSQL, 7.5% for MySQL, and 3.4% for MariaDB Server. It’s clear MongoDB topping the list ensures they have a lot to celebrate, as evidenced by this: Stack Overflow Research of 100,000 Developers Finds MongoDB is the Most Wanted Database. (In 2017, 60.8% loved PostgreSQL, 55% MongoDB, and 49.6% for MySQL; MySQL was the 3rd most dreaded database with 50.4%, followed by 45% for MongoDB, and 39.2% for PostgreSQL; as for the most wanted, MongoDB won with 20.8%, PostgreSQL got second at 11.5%, and MySQL 8.5%).

So if Stack Overflow surveys are an indication of usage, MySQL is still way more popular than anything else, including MariaDB Server regardless of its current distribution. Speaking of MariaDB, the MariaDB Foundation now accepts donations in cryptocurrencies.

MongoDB Evolved is something you should totally check out. I wish something like this exists for MySQL, since tonnes of people ask questions, e.g. “Does MySQL support transactions?”, etc.

Releases

Link List

Upcoming appearances

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

 

Mar
14
2018
--

Saw Percona at SCaLE 16x? Come See Even More at Percona Live 2018!

Did you see Percona at SCaLE 16x? I spent a couple of days there learning about open source software, databases, and other interesting topics. You can get even more open source database information at Percona Live 2018.

SCaLE is the largest community-run open-source and free software conference in North America. It is held annually in the greater Los Angeles area. This year’s event took place on March 8-11, 2018, at the Pasadena Convention Center. SCaLE 16X hosted 150 exhibitors this year, along with nearly 130 sessions, tutorials and special events.

Percona has been attending now for a number of years, and this year was no exception. Besides our booth in the Exhibit Hall, we had two speakers giving three different talks:

Percona at Scale 16xPeter Zaitsev, Percona CEO and Founder

Using MySQL for Distributed Database Architectures

In modern data architectures, we’re increasingly moving from single node design systems to distributed architectures using multiple nodes – often spread across multiple databases and multiple continents. Such architectures bring many benefits (such as scalability and resiliency), but can also bring a lot of pain if not correctly architected.

In this presentation, we looked into how we can use MySQL to engineer such systems. Firstly, we looked into the application data requirements that can shape which distributed architectures will work for an application, and what are their benefits and tradeoffs. Then we looked into how to implement the architectures with MySQL, using conventional and proven options such as MySQL Replication, as well as newer options such as:

    • MySQL Multi-Source Replication
    • MySQL Group Replication
    • Percona XtraDB Cluster and Galera
    • Application-driven replication using Kafka

Finally, since a common cause of production problems is a misunderstanding of how distributed systems are designed to behave during failure, we examined what can commonly happen to cause architecture scenarios to fail.

Why We’re Excited About MySQL 8.0

There are many great new features in MySQL 8.0, but how exactly can they help your applications? This session took a practical look at MySQL 8.0 features and improvements. We looked at the bugs, issues and limitations of previous MySQL versions and how MySQL 8.0 addresses them. It also covered what you can do with MySQL 8.0 that you couldn’t before.

Percona at Scale 16x 2Colin Charles

Capacity Planning for your Data Stores

Imagine a ticket sales website that does normal events like an M2M concert, but also occasionally sells tickets to the very popular play Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. This is a perfect capacity planning example. Selling tickets requires that you never sell more tickets than you actually have. You want to load-balance your queries, to shard your data stores and split reads and writes. You need to determine where the system bottlenecks, so you need a baseline for your regular traffic. The website must be able to handle the increased load for extremely popular performances, but you don’t want to buy servers that aren’t doing anything for much of the time. (This is also why the cloud is so popular today.)

Colin Charles explored storage capacity planning for OLTP and data warehousing uses and explains how metrics collection helps you plan your requirements. Coupled with the elastic nature of clouds, you should never have an error establishing database connection. Along the way, Colin also covered tools such as Box Anemometer, innotop, the slow query log, Percona Toolkit (pt-query-digest), vmstat, Facebook’s Prophet, and Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM).

Liked SCaLE 16x? Come to Percona Live 2018!

If you attended the SCaLE 16x conference, there was a multitude of excellent talks on many different open source topics. Many of these same speakers, companies, sponsors and attendees will also be at the Percona Live 2018 Open Source Database Conference in Santa Clara, CA, on April 23 – 25, 2018.

Join the open source database community in Santa Clara, California, to learn about the core topics in MySQL, MongoDB and other open source databases. Get briefed on the hottest topics, learn about building and maintaining high-performing deployments and listen to technical experts and top industry leaders. The Percona Live 2018 – Open Source Database Conference is a great event for users of any level exploring open source database technologies.

Some of these speakers and companies attending include:

. . . and many more.

Hurry and register before the event sells out!

Feb
23
2018
--

Webinar Tuesday February 27, 2018: Monitoring Amazon RDS with Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM)

Monitoring Amazon RDS

Monitoring Amazon RDSPlease join Percona’s Build / Release Engineer, Mykola Marzhan, as he presents Monitoring Amazon RDS with Percona Monitoring and Management on February 27, 2018, at 7:00 am PDT (UTC-8) / 10:00 am EDT (UTC-5).


Are you concerned about how you are monitoring your AWS environment? Keeping track of what is happening in your Amazon RDS deployment is key to guaranteeing the performance and availability of your database for your critical applications and services.

Did you know that Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) ships with support for MySQL on Amazon RDS and Amazon Aurora out of the box? It does!

Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) is a free and open-source platform for managing and monitoring MySQL, Percona Server for MySQL MariaDB, MongoDB, Percona Server for MongoDB performance both on-premise and in the cloud.

In this session we’ll discuss:

  • Configuring PMM (metrics and queries) against Amazon RDS MySQL and Amazon Aurora using an EC2 instance
  • Configuring PMM against CloudWatch metrics
  • Setting configuration parameters for AWS for maximum PMM visibility

Register for the webinar now.

mykolaMykola Marzhan, Release Engineer

Mykola joined Percona in 2016 as a release engineer. He has been developing monitoring systems since 2004, and has been working as Release Engineer/Release Manager/DevOps for ten years. Recently, Mykola achieved an AWS Certified Solutions Architect (Professional) authentication.

 

Powered by WordPress | Theme: Aeros 2.0 by TheBuckmaker.com