Jul
19
2017
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Blog Poll: What Operating System Do You Run Your Development Database On?

Blog Poll

Blog PollIn this post, we’ll use a blog poll to find out what operating system you use to run your development database servers.

In our last blog poll, we looked at what OS you use for your production database. Now we would like to see what you use for your development database.

As databases grow to meet more challenges and expanding application demands, they must try and get the maximum amount of performance out of available resources. How they work with an operating system can affect many variables, and help or hinder performance. The operating system you use for your database can impact consumable choices (such as hardware and memory). The operating system you use can also impact your choice of database engine as well (or vice versa).

When new projects, new applications or services or testing new architecture solutions, it makes sense to create a development environment in order to test and run scenarios before they hit production. Do you use the same OS in your development environment as you do your production environment?

Please let us know what operating system you use to run your development database. For this blog poll, we’re asking which operating system you use to actually run your development database server (not the base operating system).

If you’re running virtualized Linux on Windows, please select Linux as the OS used for development. Pick up to three that apply. Add any thoughts or other options in the comments section:

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

Thanks in advance for your responses – they will help the open source community determine how database environments are being deployed.

Jul
17
2017
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Percona Live Europe 2017 Call for Papers Deadline Extended to July 24, 2017

Percona Live Call for Papers

Percona Live Call for PapersWe are extending the Percona Live Open Source Database Conference Europe 2017 call for papers deadline to Monday, July 24, 2017. Get your submissions in now!

Between our Conference Committee working hard to review all the outstanding talk ideas, and the many community requests for more time, we didn’t want to shortchange any of our applicants. If you procrastinated too long, didn’t complete your talk submission or just plain forgot to submit, this is your reprieve! You have one extra week to pull together a proposal for a talk on open source databases at Percona Live Europe 2017.

The theme of Percona Live Europe 2017 is “Championing Open Source Databases.” There are sessions on MySQL, MariaDBMongoDB and Other Open Source Database technologies, including time series databases, PostgreSQL and RocksDB. Are you:

  • Working with MongoDB as a developer?
  • Creating a new MySQL-variant time series database?
  • Deploying MariaDB in a novel way?
  • Using open source database technology to solve a business issue?

Share your open source database experiences with peers and professionals in the open source community! We invite you to submit your speaking proposal for breakout, tutorial or lightning talk sessions:

  • Breakout Session. Broadly cover a technology area using specific examples. Sessions should be either 25 minutes or 50 minutes in length (including Q&A).
  • Tutorial Session. Present a technical session that aims for a level between a training class and a conference breakout session. Encourage attendees to bring and use laptops for working on detailed and hands-on presentations. Tutorials will be three or six hours in length (including Q&A).
  • Lightning Talk. Give a five-minute presentation focusing on one key point that interests the open source community: technical, lighthearted or entertaining talks on new ideas, a successful project, a cautionary story, a quick tip or demonstration.

Submit your talk ideas now.

PLEASE NOTE: We have a new call for papers system that requires everyone to register for a new account. You can save proposals as drafts and edit them later. Once a proposal is submitted, it is final. You can NOT change a proposal once submitted.

Register for Percona Live Europe 2017 now! Early Bird registration lasts until August 8

Last year’s Percona Live Europe sold out, and we’re looking to do the same at this year’s conference. Don’t miss your chance to get your ticket at its most affordable price. Click here to register.

Percona Live 2017 sponsorship opportunities are available now

Percona Live Europe 2017 is just around the corner. Have you secured your sponsorship yet? Last year’s event sold out! Booth selection for our limited sponsorship opportunities is on a first-come, first-served basis. Click here to find out how to sponsor.

Don’t miss out on a special room rate at the Percona Live Europe 2017 venue

This year, Percona Live Europe is being held at the Radisson Blu Royal Hotel, Dublin. You can get a special room rate when you attend the conference. But hurry, rooms are going fast! To get the special room rate:

  1. Visit https://www.radissonblu.com/en/royalhotel-dublin.
  2. Click BOOK NOW at the top right.
  3. Enter your preferred check-in and check-out dates, and how many rooms.
  4. From the drop-down “Select Rate Type,” choose Promotional Code.
  5. Enter the code PERCON to get the discount.

This special deal includes breakfast each morning! The group rate only applies if used within the Percona Live Europe group block dates (September 25-27, 2017). The deadline for booking with this rate is July 24, 2017.

Jul
17
2017
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Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2.14-3.4 is Now Available

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2.14-3.4Percona announces the release of Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2.14-3.4 on July 17, 2017. Download the latest version from the Percona web site or the Percona Software Repositories.

Percona Server for MongoDB is an enhanced, open-source, fully compatible, highly scalable, zero-maintenance downtime database that supports the MongoDB v3.2 protocol and drivers. It extends MongoDB with MongoRocks, Percona Memory Engine, and PerconaFT storage engine, as well as enterprise-grade features like External Authentication, Audit Logging, Profiling Rate Limiting, and Hot Backup at no extra cost. Percona Server for MongoDB requires no changes to MongoDB applications or code.

NOTE: This release deprecates the PerconaFT storage engine. It will not be available in future releases.

This release is based on MongoDB 3.2.14 and includes the following additional changes:

New Features

Bugs Fixed

  • #PSMDB-67: Fixed mongod service status messages.

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2.14-3.4 release notes are available in the official documentation.

Jul
14
2017
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Percona Monitoring and Management 1.2.0 is Now Available

Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM)

Percona announces the release of Percona Monitoring and Management 1.2.0 on July 14, 2017.

For installation instructions, see the Deployment Guide.


Changes in PMM Server

PMM Server 1.2.0 introduced the following changes:

New Features

  • PMM-737: New graphs in System Overview dashboard:
      • Memory Advanced Details
      • Saturation Metrics

  • PMM-1090: Added ESXi support for PMM Server virtual appliance.

UI Fixes

  • PMM-707: Fixed QPS metric in MySQL Overview dashboard to always show queries per second regardless of the selected interval.
  • PMM-708: Fixed tooltips for graphs that displayed incorrectly.
  • PMM-739PMM-797: Fixed PMM Server update feature on the landing page.
  • PMM-823: Fixed arrow padding for collapsible blocks in QAN.
  • PMM-887: Disabled the Add button when no table is specified for showing query info in QAN.
  • PMM-888: Disabled the Apply button in QAN settings when nothing is changed.
  • PMM-889: Fixed the switch between UTC and local time zone in the QAN time range selector.
  • PMM-909: Added message No query example when no example for a query is available in QAN.
  • PMM-933: Fixed empty tooltips for Per Query Stats column in the query details section of QAN.
  • PMM-937: Removed the percentage of total query time in query details for the TOTAL entry in QAN (because it is 100% by definition).
  • PMM-951: Fixed the InnoDB Page Splits graph formula in the MySQL InnoDB Metrics Advanced dashboard.
  • PMM-953: Enabled stacking for graphs in MySQL Performance Schema dashboard.
  • PMM-954: Renamed Top Users by Connections graph in MySQL User Statistics dashboard to Top Users by Connections Created and added the Connections/sec label to the Y-axis.
  • PMM-957: Refined titles for Client Connections and Client Questions graphs in ProxySQL Overview dashboard to mentioned that they show metrics for all host groups (not only the selected one).
  • PMM-961: Fixed the formula for Client Connections graph in ProxySQL Overview dashboard.
  • PMM-964: Fixed the gaps for high zoom levels in MySQL Connections graph on the MySQL Overview dashboard.
  • PMM-976: Fixed Orchestrator handling by supervisorctl.
  • PMM-1129: Updated the MySQL Replication dashboard to support new connection_name label introduced in mysqld_exporter for multi-source replication monitoring.
  • PMM-1054: Fixed typo in the tooltip for the Settings button in QAN.
  • PMM-1055: Fixed link to Query Analytics from Metrics Monitor when running PMM Server as a virtual appliance.
  • PMM-1086: Removed HTML code that showed up in the QAN time range selector.

Bug Fixes

  • PMM-547: Added warning page to Query Analytics app when there are no PMM Clients running the QAN service.
  • PMM-799: Fixed Orchestrator to show correct version.
  • PMM-1031: Fixed initialization of Query Profile section in QAN that broke after upgrading Angular.
  • PMM-1087: Fixed QAN package building.

Other Improvements

  • PMM-348: Added daily log rotation for nginx.
  • PMM-968: Added Prometheus build information.
  • PMM-969: Updated the Prometheus memory usage settings to leverage new flag. For more information about setting memory consumption by PMM, see FAQ.

Changes in PMM Client

PMM Client 1.2.0 introduced the following changes:

New Features

  • PMM-1114: Added PMM Client packages for Debian 9 (“stretch”).

Bug Fixes

  • PMM-481PMM-1132: Fixed fingerprinting for queries with multi-line comments.
  • PMM-623: Fixed mongodb_exporter to display correct version.
  • PMM-927: Fixed bug with empty metrics for MongoDB query analytics.
  • PMM-1126: Fixed promu build for node_exporter.
  • PMM-1201: Fixed node_exporter version.

Other Improvements

  • PMM-783: Directed mongodb_exporter log messages to stderr and excluded many generic messages from the default INFO logging level.
  • PMM-756: Merged upstream node_exporter version 0.14.0.
    PMM deprecated several collectors in this release:

    • gmond – Out of scope.
    • megacli – Requires forking, to be moved to textfile collection.
    • ntp – Out of scope.

    It also introduced the following breaking change:

    • Collector errors are now a separate metric: node_scrape_collector_success, not a label on node_exporter_scrape_duration_seconds
  • PMM-1011: Merged upstream mysqld_exporter version 0.10.0.
    This release introduced the following breaking change:

    • mysql_slave_... metrics now include an additional connection_name label to support MariaDB multi-source replication.

About Percona Monitoring and Management

Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) is an open-source platform for managing and monitoring MySQL and MongoDB performance. Percona developed it in collaboration with experts in the field of managed database services, support and consulting.

Percona Monitoring and Management is a free and open-source solution that you can run in your own environment for maximum security and reliability. It provides thorough time-based analysis for MySQL and MongoDB servers to ensure that your data works as efficiently as possible.

A live demo of PMM is available at pmmdemo.percona.com.

Please provide your feedback and questions on the PMM forum.

If you would like to report a bug or submit a feature request, use the PMM project in JIRA.

Jul
11
2017
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Webinar Wednesday July 12, 2017: MongoDB Index Types – How, When and Where Should They Be Used?

MongoDB Index Types

MongoDB Index TypesJoin Percona’s Senior Technical Services Engineer, Adamo Tonete as he presents MongoDB Index Types: How, When and Where Should They Be Used? on Wednesday, July 12, 2017 at 11:00 am PDT / 2:00 pm EDT (UTC-7).

MongoDB has 12 index types. Do you know how each works, or when you should use each of them? This talk will arm you with this knowledge, and help you understand how indexes impact performance, storage and even the sharding of your data. We will also discuss some solid index operational practices, as well as some settings for things like TTL you might not know exist. The contents of this webinar will make you a Rock Star!

Register for the webinar here.

MongoDB Index TypesAdamo Tonete, Senior Technical Services Engineer

Adamo joined Percona in 2015, after working as a MongoDB/MySQL database administrator for three years. As the main database admin of a startup, he was responsible for suggesting the best architecture and data flows for a worldwide company in a 24/7 environment. Before that, he worked as a Microsoft SQL Server DBA for a large e-commerce company, working mainly on performance tuning and automation. Adamo has almost eight years of experience working as a DBA, and in the past three years he has moved to NoSQL technologies (without giving up relational databases).

Jul
10
2017
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Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4.5-1.5 is Now Available

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4Percona announces the release of Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4.5-1.5 on July 10, 2017. Download the latest version from the Percona web site or the Percona Software Repositories.

Percona Server for MongoDB is an enhanced, open source, fully compatible, highly-scalable, zero-maintenance downtime database supporting the MongoDB v3.4 protocol and drivers. It extends MongoDB with Percona Memory Engine and MongoRocks storage engine, as well as several enterprise-grade features:

Percona Server for MongoDB requires no changes to MongoDB applications or code.

This release is based on MongoDB 3.4.5 and includes the following additional changes:

New Features

Bugs Fixed

  • #PSMDB-67: Fixed mongod service status messages.
Jul
08
2017
--

MongoDB Indexing Types: How, When and Where Should They Be Used?

MongoDB Index Types

MongoDB IndexingIn this blog post, we will talk about MongoDB indexing, and the different types of indexes that are available in MongoDB.

Note: We are hosting a webinar on July 12, 2017, where I will talk about MongoDB indexes and how to choose a good indexing plan.

MongoDB is a NoSQL database that is document-oriented. NoSQL databases share many features with relational databases, and one of them is indexes. The question is how are such documents indexed in the database?

Remember that because MongoDB is a database that writes JSONs, there is no predefined schema in the document. The same field can be a string or an integer – depending on the document.

MongoDB, as well as other databases, use B-trees to index. With some exceptions, the algorithm is the same as a relational database.

The B-tree can use integers and strings together to organize data. The most important thing to know is that an index-less database must read all the documents to filter what you want, while an indexed database can – through indexes – find the documents quickly. Imagine you are looking for a book in a disorganized library. This is how the query optimizer feels when we are looking for something that is not indexed.

There are several different types of indexes available: single field, compound indexes, hashed indexes, geoIndexes, unique, sparse, partial, text… and so on. All of them help the database in some way, although they obviously also get in the way of write performance if used too much.

  • Single fields. Single fields are simple indexes that index only one field in a collection. MongoDB can usually only use one index per query, but in some cases the database can take advantage of more than one index to reply to a query (this is called index intersection). Also, $or actually executes more than one query at a time. Therefore $or and $in can also use more than one index.
  • Compound indexes. Compound indexes are indexes that have more than one indexed field, so ideally the most restrictive field should be to the left of the B-tree. If you want to index by sex and birth, for instance, the index should begin by birth as it is much more restrictive than sex.
  • Hashed indexes. Shards use hashed indexes, and create a hash according to the field value to spread the writes across the sharded instances.
  • GeoIndexes. GeoIndexes are a special index type that allows a search based on location, distance from a point and many other different features.
  • Unique indexes. Unique indexes work as in relational databases. They guarantee that the value doesn’t repeat and raise an error when we try to insert a duplicated value. Unique doesn’t work across shards.
  • Text indexes. Text indexes can work better with indexes than a single indexed field. There are different flags we can use, like giving weights to control the results or using different collections.
  • Sparse/Partial indexes. Sparse and partial indexes seem very similar. However, sparse indexes will index only an existing field and not check its value, while partial indexes will apply a filter (like greater than) to a field to index. This means the partial index doesn’t index all the documents with the existing field, but only documents that match the create index filter.

We will discuss and talk more about indexes and how they work in my webinar MongoDB® Index Types: How, When and Where Should They Be Used? If you have questions, feel free to ask them in the comments below and I will try to answer all of them in the webinar (or in a complementary post).

I hope this blog post was useful, please feel free to reach out me on twitter @AdamoTonete or @percona.

Jul
07
2017
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Last Resort: How to Use a Backup to Start a Secondary Instance for MongoDB?

Backup to Start a Secondary

Backup to Start a SecondaryIn this blog post, I’ll look at how you can use a backup to start a secondary instance for MongoDB.

Although the documentation says it is not possible to use a backup to start a secondary, sometimes this is the only possible way to start a new instance. In this blog post, we will explain how to bypass this limitation and use a backup to start a secondary instance.

The initial sync/rsync or snapshot works fine when the instances are in the same data center, but it can fail or be really slow. Much slower than moving a compressed backup between data centers.

Not every backup can be used as a source for starting a replica set. The backup must have the oplog file. This means the backup must be done in a previously existent replica set using the

--oplog flag

 point in time backup when dumping the collections. The time spent to move and restore the backup file must be less than the oplog window.

Please follow the next steps to create a secondary from a backup:

  1. Create a backup using the
    --oplog

     command.

    mongodump --oplog -o /tmp/backup/
  2. Backup the replica set collection from the local database.

    mongodump -d local -c system.replset
  3. After backup finishes please confirm the oplog.rs file is in the backup folder.
  4. Use
    bsondump

     to convert the oplog to JSON. We will use the last oplog entry as a starting point for the replica set.

    bsondump oplog.rs > oplog.rs.txt
  5. Initiate the new instance without the replica set parameter configured. At this point, the instance will act as a single instance.
  6. Restore the database normally using
    --oplogreplay

     to apply all the oplogs that have been recorded while the backup was running.

    mongorestore /tmp/backup --oplogReplay
  7. Connect to this server and use the local database to create the oplog.rs collection. Please use the same value as the other members (e.g., 20 GB).
    mongo
    use local
    db.runCommand( { create: "oplog.rs", capped: true, size: (20 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024) } )
  8. From the oplog.rs.txt generated in step 4, get the last line and copy the fields ts and h values to a MongoDB document.

    tail -n 1 opslog.rs.txt
  9. Insert the JSON value to the oplog.rs collection that was created before.
    mongo
    use local
    db.oplog.rs.insert({ ts: Timestamp(12354454,1), h: NumberLong("-3434387384732843")})
  10. Restore the replset collection to the local database.
    mongorestore -d local -c system.replset ./backup/repliset.bson
  11. Stop the service and edit the parameter replica set name to match the existing replica set.
  12. Connect to the primary and add this new host. The new host must start catching up the oplog and get in sync after a few hours/minutes, depending on the number of operations the replica set handles. It is important to consider adding this new secondary as a hidden secondary, without votes if possible, to avoid triggering an election. When the secondary is added to the replica set drivers, it will start using this host to perform reads. If you don’t add the server with
    hidden: true

    , the application will read inconsistent data (old data).

    mongo
    PRIMARY>rs.add({_id : <your id>, host: "<newhost:27017>", hidden : true, votes : 0, priority :0})
  13. Please check the replication lag, and once the seconds behind master is near to zero, change the host parameters in the replica set to
    hidden: false

     and priority or

    votes

    .

    mongo
    PRIMARY> rs.printSlaveReplicationInfo()
  14. We are considering a replica set with three members, where the new secondary has the ID 2 in the member’s array. Use the following command to unhide the secondary and make it available for reads. The priority and votes depend on your environment. Please notice you might need to change the member ID.
    mongo
    PRIMARY> cfg = rs.config()
    cfg.members[2].hidden = false
    cfg.members[2].votes = 1
    cfg.members[2].priority = 1
    PRIMARY> rs.reconfig(rs)

I hope this tutorial helps in an emergency situation. Please consider using initial sync, disk snapshots and hot backups before using this method.

Feel free to reach out me on twitter @AdamoTonete or @percona.

Jun
30
2017
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Industry Recognition of Percona: Great Products, Great Team

Percona

Percona’s focus on customer success pushes us to deliver the very best products, services and support. Three recent industry awards reflect our continued success in achieving these goals.

aba-logoWe recently garnered a Bronze Stevie Award “Company of the Year – Computer Software – Medium.” Stevies are some of the most coveted awards in the tech industry. Each year, more than 10,000 organizations in more than 60 nations compete for Stevies. It’s a huge honor to come away with a win.

DBTA_0_0Percona was also included in Database Trends and Applications’ (DBTA) annual DBTA 100 list of the companies that matter most in data. The directory was compiled by the editorial staff of DBTA and spotlights the companies that deal with evolving market demands through innovation in software, services, and hardware.

zippia_logo_headerNewZippia, a new website dedicated to helping recent grads with their career choices, ranked Percona in the top 10 of the “20 Best Companies To Work For In Raleigh, NC.” To compile the ranking, Zippia chose companies in a 25-mile radius that consistently get high reviews from career resource websites.  

Top CEOFinally, Percona co-founder and CEO Peter Zaitsev was honored as one of the Top Rated CEOs in Raleigh, North Carolina, by Owler. Owler looked at 167,000 leaders across 50 cities and 25 industries worldwide and identified the top 1,000. This is a huge honor for Peter!

Driven by Peter’s vision, all of us at Percona remain committed to building an excellent organization that is the champion of unbiased open source database solutions. Our continued success, growth and recognition from organizations like the above lead us to believe that the best is yet to come. Stay tuned!

Jun
29
2017
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How Does Percona Software Compare: the Value of Percona Software and Services

Percona Software and Services

Percona Software and ServicesIn this blog post, I’ll discuss my experience as a Solutions Engineer in explaining the value of Percona software and services to customers.

The inspiration for this blog post was a recent conversation with a prospective client. They were exploring open source software solutions and professional services for the first time. This is a fairly common and recurring conversation with individuals and enterprises exploring open source for the first time. They generally find Percona through recommendations from colleagues, or organic Google searches. One of the most common questions Percona gets when engaging at this level is, “How does Percona’s software compare with << Insert Closed-source Enterprise DB Here >>?”

We’re glad you asked. Percona’s position on this question is to explain the value of Percona in the open source space. Percona does not push a particular flavor of open source software. We recommend an appropriate solution given each of our client’s unique business and application requirements. A client coming from this space is likely to have a lengthy list of compliance, performance and scalability requirements. We love these conversations. Our focus is always on providing our customers with the best services, support, and open-source technology solutions possible.

If there were a silver bullet for every database, Percona would not have been as successful over the past 10 (almost 11!) years. We know that MongoDB, MariaDB, MySQL Enterprise, MySQL Community, Percona Server for MySQL, etc., is never the right answer 100% of the time. Our competitors in this space will most likely disagree with this assessment – because they have an incentive to sell their own software. The quality of all of these offerings is extremely high, and our customers use each of them to great success. Using the wrong database software for a particular use-case is like using a butter knife to cut a steak. You can probably make it work, but it will be a frustrating and unrewarding experience.

Usually, there are more efficient alternatives.

There is a better question to ask instead of software vs. software, which basically turns into an apples vs. oranges conversation. It’s: “Why should we partner with Percona as our business adopts more open-source software?” This is where Percona’s experience and expertise in the open-source database space shine.

Percona is invested in ensuring you are making the right decisions based on your needs. Choosing the wrong database solution or architecture can be catastrophic. A recent Ponemon study (https://planetaklimata.com.ua/instr/Liebert_Hiross/Cost_of_Data_Center_Outages_2016_Eng.pdf) estimates the average cost of downtime can be up to $8,800 per minute. Not only is downtime costly, but re-architecting your environment due to an errant choice in database solutions can be costly as well. Uber experienced these pains when using Postgres as their database solution and wrote an interesting blog post about their decision to switch back to MySQL (https://eng.uber.com/mysql-migration/). Postgres has, in turn, responded to Uber recently (http://thebuild.com/presentations/uber-perconalive-2017.pdf). The point of bringing up this high-profile switch is not to take sides, but to highlight the breadth of knowledge necessary to navigate the open source database environment. Given its complexity, the necessity of a trusted business partner with unbiased recommendations should be apparent.

This is where Percona’s experience and expertise in the open source database space shines. Percona’s only investors are its customers, and our only customers are those using our services. Because of this, our core values are intertwined with customer success and satisfaction. This strategy trickles down through support, to professional services and all the way to the engineering team, where efforts are focused on developing software and features that provide the most value to customers as a whole.

Focusing on a business partner in the open source space is a much more important and worthwhile effort than focusing on a software provider. Percona has hands-on, practical experience with a varying array of open-source technologies in the MySQL, MariaDB, and MongoDB ecosystems. We’ve tracked our ability to assist our customer’s efficiencies in their databases and see a 30% efficiency improvement on average with some cases seeing a 10x boost in performance of their database. (https://www.percona.com/blog/2016/07/20/value-database-support/). The open source software itself has proven itself time and again to be the choice of billion dollar industries. Again, there is not one universal choice among companies. There are success stories that run the gamut of open source software solutions.

To summarize, there’s a reason we redirect the software vs. software question. It’s not because we don’t like talking about how great our software is (it is great, and holds it own with other open source offerings). It’s because the question does not highlight Percona’s value. Percona doesn’t profit from its software. Supporting the open-source ecosystem is our goal. We are heavily invested in providing our customers with the right open source software solution for their situation regardless of whether it is ours or not. Our experience and expertise in this space make us the ideal partner for businesses adopting more open source technology in place of enterprise-licensed models.

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