Feb
05
2018
--

Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.8 Release Is Now Available

Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.7

Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.8Percona announces the release of Percona Monitoring Plugins 1.1.8.

Changelog

  • Add MySQL 5.7 support
  • Changed a canary check to use timestamp.now() and return a timedelta.seconds
  • Remove an additional condition for the Dictionary memory allocated
  • Fixed a false-positive problem when the calculated delay was less than 0 and the -m was not set.
  • Fixed the problem where slaves would alert due to deadlocks on the master.
  • If using pt-heartbeat, get_slave_status was only called when the -s option is set to MASTER
  • Disabled UNK alerts by default (it is possible to enable them explicitly).
  • A fix was added for MySQL Multi-Source replication.
  • The graph Percona InnoDB Memory Allocation showed zeroes for the
    metrics Total memory (data source item nl) and Dictionary memory
    (data source item nm) when used for MySQL 5.7.18, because the syntax
    of SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS has changed in MySQL 5.7 (see https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/innodb-standard-monitor.html).
  • The graph Percona InnoDB I/O Pending showed NaN for the metrics
    Pending Log Writes (data source item hn) and Pending Chkp Writes
    (data source item hk) when used for MySQL 5.7.18, because the syntax
    of SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS has changed in MySQL 5.7 (see https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/innodb-standard-monitor.html).
  • Added server @@hostname as a possible match to avoid DNS lookups while allowing hostname-match.

A new tarball is available from downloads area or in packages from our software repositories. The plugins are fully supported for customers with a Percona Support contract and free installation services are provided as part of some contracts. You can find links to the documentation, forums and more at the project homepage.

About Percona Monitoring Plugins
Percona Monitoring Plugins are monitoring and graphing components designed to integrate seamlessly with widely deployed solutions such as Nagios, Cacti and Zabbix.

Dec
21
2017
--

This Week in Data with Colin Charles 20: cPanel changes strategy, Percona Live CFP extended

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

I think the biggest news from last week was from cPanel – if you haven’t already read the post, please do – on Being a Good Open Source Community Member: Why we hesitated on MySQL 5.7. cPanel anticipated MariaDB being the eventual replacement for MySQL, based on movements from Red Hat, Wikipedia and Google. The advantage focused on transparency around security disclosure, and the added features/improvements. Today though, “MySQL now consistently matches or outpaces MariaDB when it comes to development and releases, which in turn is increasing the demand on us for providing those upgraded versions of MySQL by our users.” And maybe a little more telling, “when MariaDB 10.2 became stable in May 2017 it included many features found in MySQL 5.7. However, MySQL reached stable nearly 18 months earlier in October 2015.” (emphasis mine).

So cPanel is going forth and supporting MySQL 5.7. They will continue supporting MariaDB Server for the foreseeable future. This really is cPanel ensuring they are responsive to users: “The people using and building database-driven applications are doing so with MySQL in mind, and are hesitant to add support for MariaDB. Responding to our community’s desires is one of the most important things to us, and this is something that we are hearing asked for from our community consistently.”

I, of course, think this is a great move. Users deserve choice. And MySQL has features that are sometimes still not included in MariaDB Server. Have you seen the Complete list of new features in MySQL 5.7? Or my high-level response to a MariaDB Corporation white paper?

I can only hope to see more people think pragmatically like cPanel. Ubuntu as a Linux distribution still does – you get MySQL 5.7 as a default (very unlike the upstream Debian which ships MariaDB Server nowadays). I used to be a proponent of MariaDB Server being everywhere, when it was community-developed, feature-enhanced, and backward-compatible. However, the moment it stopped being a branch and a true fork is the moment where trouble lies for users. I think it was still marginally fine with 10.0, and maybe even 10.1, but the ability to maintain feature parity with enhanced features has long gone. Short of a rebase? But then… what would be different to the already popular branch of MySQL called Percona Server for MySQL?

While there are wins and support from cloud vendors, like Amazon AWS RDS and Microsoft Azure, you’ll notice that they offer both MySQL and MariaDB Server. Google Cloud SQL notably only offers MySQL. IBM may be a sponsor of the MariaDB Foundation, but I don’t see their services like Compose offering anything other than MySQL (with group replication nonetheless!). Platinum member Alibaba Cloud offers MySQL and PostgreSQL. However, Tencent seems to suggest that MariaDB is coming soon? One interesting statistic to watch would be user uptake naturally.

Events

From an events standpoint, the Percona Live 2018 Call for Papers has been extended to January 12, 2018. We expect an early announcement of maybe ten talks in the week of  January 5. Please submit to the CFP. Have you got your tickets yet? Nab them during our Percona Live 2018 super saver registration when they are the best price!

FOSDEM has got Sveta and myself speaking in the MySQL and Friends DevRoom, but we also have good news in the sense that Peter Zaitsev is also going to be at FOSDEM – speaking in the main track. We’ll also have plenty of schwag at the stand.

I think it’s important to take note of the updates to Percona bug tracking: yes, its Jira all the way. Would be good for everyone to start also looking at how the sausage is made.

Dragph, a “distributed fast graph database“, just raised $3m and released 1.0. Have you used it?

On a lighter note, there seems to be a tweet going around by many, so I thought I’d share it here. Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays.

He’s making a database
He’s sorting it twice
SELECT * FROM girls_boys WHERE behaviour = “nice”
SQL Claus is coming to town!

Releases

Link List

Upcoming appearances

  • FOSDEM 2018 – Brussels, Belgium – February 3-4 2018
  • SCALE16x – Pasadena, California, USA – March 8-11 2018

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

Dec
21
2017
--

Three P’s of a Successful Black Friday: Percona, Pepper Media Holding, and PMM

Successful Black Friday

As we close out the holiday season, let’s look at some data that tells us how to guarantee a successful Black Friday (from a database perspective).

There are certain peak times of the year where companies worldwide hold their breath in the hope that their databases do not become overloaded or unresponsive. A large percentage of yearly profits are achieved in a matter of hours during peak events. It is critical that the database environment remains online and responsive. According to a recent survey, users will not wait more than 2.5 seconds for a site to load before navigating elsewhere. Percona has partnered with many clients over the years to ensure success during these critical events. Our goal is always to provide our clients with the most responsive, stable open-source database environments in order to meet their business needs.

First Stop: Germany

In this blog post, we are going to take a closer look at what happened during Black Friday for a high-demand, high-traffic, business-critical application. Pepper Media Holding runs global deals sites where users post and vote on top deals on products in real-time. To give you a better idea of what the user sees, there is a screenshot below from their Germany mydealz.de branch of Pepper Media Holding.Successful Black Friday

As you can imagine, Black Friday results in a huge spike in traffic and user contribution. In order to ensure success during these crucial times, Pepper Media Holding utilizes Percona’s fully managed service offering. Percona’s Managed Services team has become an extension of Pepper Media Holding’s team by helping plan, prepare, and implement MySQL best-practices across their entire database environment.

Pepper Media Holding and Percona thought it would be interesting to reflect on Black Friday 2017 and how we worked together to flourish under huge spikes in query volume and user connections.

Below is a graph of MySQL query volume for Germany servers supporting the mydealz.de front-end. This graph is taken from Percona’s Managed Service Team’s installation of Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM), which they use to monitor Pepper Media’s environment.

As to be expected, MySQL query volume peaked shortly before and during midnight local time. It also spiked early in the morning as users were waking up. The traffic waned throughout the day. The most interesting data point is the spike from 5 AM to 9 AM which saw an 800% increase from the post-midnight dip. The sustained two-day traffic surge was on average a 200% increase when compared to normal, day-to-day query traffic hitting the database.

For more statistics on how the mydealz.de fared from a front-end and user perspective, visit Pepper Media Holding’s newsroom where Pepper Media has given a breakdown of various statistics related to website traffic during Black Friday.

Next Stop: United Kingdom

Another popular Pepper Media Holding branch is in the United Kingdom – better known as HotUKDeals. HotUKDeals hosts user-aggregated and voted-on deals for UK users. This is the busiest Pepper Media Holding database environment on average. Below is a screenshot of the user interface.

The below graphs are from our Managed Service Team’s Percona Monitoring and Management installation and representative of the UK servers supporting the HotUKDeals website traffic.

The first graph we are taking a look at is MySQL Replication Delay. As you can see, the initial midnight wave of Black Friday deals caused a negligible replica delay. The Percona Monitoring and Management MySQL Replication Delay graph is based on seconds_behind_master which is an integer value only. This means the delay is somewhere between 0 and 1 most of the time. Only once did it go between 1 and 2 over the entire course of Black Friday traffic.

The below graphs highlight the MySQL Traffic seen on the UK servers during the Black Friday traffic spike. One interesting note with this graph is the gradual lead-up to the midnight Black Friday spike. It looks like Black Friday is overstepping its boundaries into Gray Thursday. The traffic spikes here mimic the ones we saw in Germany. There’s an initial spike at midnight on Black Friday and then another spike as shoppers are waking up for their day. The UK servers saw a 361% spike in traffic the morning of Black Friday.

MySQL connections also saw an expected and significant spike during this time. Neglecting to consider max_connections system parameter during an event rush might result in “ERROR 1040 (00000): Too many connections.” However, our CEO, Peter Zaitsev, cautions against absent-mindedly setting this parameter at an unreachable level just to avoid this error. In a blog post, he explained best-practices for this scenario.

The MySQL query graph below shows a 400% spike in MySQL queries during the peak Black Friday morning traffic rush. The average number of queries hitting the database over this two day period is significantly higher than normal – approximately 183%.

Conclusion

Percona reported no emergencies during the Black Friday period for its Managed Service customers – including Pepper Media Holding. We saw similarly high traffic spikes among our customers during this 2017 Black Friday season. I hope that this run-down of a few PMM graphs taken during Pepper Media Holding’s Black Friday traffic period was informative and interesting. Special thanks to Pepper Media Holding for working with us to create this blog post.

Note: Check out our Pepper Media case study on how Percona helps them manage their database environment.

If you would like to further explore the graphs and statistics that Percona Monitoring and Management has to offer, we have a live demo available at https://pmmdemo.percona.com. To discuss how Percona Managed Services can help your database thrive during event-based traffic spikes (and all year round), please call us at +1-888-316-9775 (USA), +44 203 608 6727 (Europe), or have us contact you.

Dec
20
2017
--

Percona Live 2018 Call for Papers Deadline Extended to January 12, 2018

Percona Live 2018 Call for Papers

Percona Live 2018 Call for PapersPercona is extending the Percona Live 2018 call for papers deadline to January 12, 2018!

Percona’s gift to you this holiday season is the gift of time – submit your speaking topics right up until January 12, 2018!

As the year winds up, we received many requests to extend the Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018 call for papers. Since many speakers wanted to submit during the week that they’re planning vacations (from Christmas until New Year’s Day), we realized that December 22 was too soon.

If you haven’t submitted already, please consider doing so. Speaking at Percona Live is a great way to talk about what you’re doing, build up your personal and company brands, and get collaborators to your project. If selected, all speakers receive a full complimentary conference pass.

Percona Live 2018 is the destination to share, learn and explore all pertinent topics related to open source databases. The theme for Percona Live 2018 is “Championing Open Source Databases,” with topics on MySQLMongoDB and other open source databases, including time series databases, PostgreSQL and RocksDB. Session tracks include Developers, Operations, and Business/Case Studies.

Percona Live KeynotesRemember, just like last year, we aren’t looking for just MySQL-ecosystemrelated talks (that includes MariaDB Server and Percona Server for MySQL). We are actively looking for talks around MongoDB, as well as other open source databases (so this is where you can add PostgreSQL, time series databases, graph databases, etc.). That also involves complementary technologies, such as the increasing importance of the cloud and container solutions such as Kubernetes.

Talk about your journey to open source. Describe the technical and business values of moving to or using open source databases. How did you convince your company to make the move? Was there tangible ROI? Share your case studies, best practices and technical knowledge with an engaged audience of open source peers.

We are looking for breakout sessions (25 or 50 minutes long), tutorials (3 hours or 6 hours long), and lightning talks and birds of a feather sessions. Submit as many topics as you think you can deliver well.

The conference itself features one day of tutorials and two days of talks. There will also be exciting keynote talks. Don’t forget that registration is now open, and our Super Saver tickets are the best price you can get (Super Saver tickets are on sale until January 7, 2018).

If your company is interested in sponsoring the conference, please take a look at the sponsorship prospectus.

All in, submit away and remember the Percona Live 2018 call for papers deadline is January 12, 2018. We look forward to seeing you at the conference from April 23-25 2018 in Santa Clara.

Dec
20
2017
--

Updates to Percona Bug Tracking

Percona Bug Tracking

Percona Bug TrackingWe’re completing our move of Percona bug tracking into JIRA, and the drop-dead date is December 28, 2017.

For some time now, Percona has maintained both the legacy Launchpad bug tracking system and a JIRA bug tracking system for some of the newer products. The time has come to consolidate everything into the JIRA bug tracking system.

Assuming everything goes according to schedule, on December 28, 2017, we will copy all bug reports in Launchpad into the appropriate JIRA projects (with the appropriate issue state). The new JIRA issue will link to the original Launchpad issue, and the new JIRA issue link is added to the original Launchpad issue. Once this is done, we will then turn off editing on the Launchpad projects.

Q&A

Which Launchpad projects are affected?
Why are you copying all closed issues from Launchpad?

Copying all Launchpad issues to JIRA enables it to be the one place to search for previously reported issues, instead of having to search for old issues in Launchpad and new issues in JIRA.

What should I do now to prepare?

Go to https://jira.percona.com/ and create an account.

Thanks for reporting bugs, and post any questions in the comments section.

Dec
07
2017
--

Hands-On Look at ZFS with MySQL

ZFS with MySQL

ZFS with MySQLThis post is a hands-on look at ZFS with MySQL.

In my previous post, I highlighted the similarities between MySQL and ZFS. Before going any further, I’d like you to be able to play and experiment with ZFS. This post shows you how to configure ZFS with MySQL in a minimalistic way on either Ubuntu 16.04 or Centos 7.

Installation

In order to be able to use ZFS, you need some available storage space. For storage – since the goal here is just to have a hands-on experience – we’ll use a simple file as a storage device. Although simplistic, I have now been using a similar setup on my laptop for nearly three years (just can’t get rid of it, it is too useful). For simplicity, I suggest you use a small Centos7 or Ubuntu 16.04 VM with one core, 8GB of disk and 1GB of RAM.

First, you need to install ZFS as it is not installed by default. On Ubuntu 16.04, you simply need to run:

root@Ubuntu1604:~# apt-get install zfs-dkms zfsutils-linux

On RedHat or Centos 7.4, the procedure is a bit more complex. First, we need to install the EPEL ZFS repository:

[root@Centos7 ~]# yum install http://download.zfsonlinux.org/epel/zfs-release.el7_4.noarch.rpm
[root@Centos7 ~]# gpg --quiet --with-fingerprint /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-zfsonlinux
[root@Centos7 ~]# gpg --quiet --with-fingerprint /etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-CentOS-7

Apparently, there were issues with ZFS kmod kernel modules on RedHat/Centos. I never had any issues with Ubuntu (and who knows how often the kernel is updated). Anyway, it is recommended that you enable kABI-tracking kmods. Edit the file /etc/yum.repos.d/zfs.repo, disable the ZFS repo and enable the zfs-kmod repo. The beginning of the file should look like:

[zfs]
name=ZFS on Linux for EL7 - dkms
baseurl=http://download.zfsonlinux.org/epel/7.4/$basearch/
enabled=0
metadata_expire=7d
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-zfsonlinux
[zfs-kmod]
name=ZFS on Linux for EL7 - kmod
baseurl=http://download.zfsonlinux.org/epel/7.4/kmod/$basearch/
enabled=1
metadata_expire=7d
gpgcheck=1
gpgkey=file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-zfsonlinux
...

Now, we can proceed and install ZFS:

[root@Centos7 ~]# yum install zfs

After the installation, I have ZFS version 0.6.5.6 on Ubuntu and version 0.7.3.0 on Centos7. The version difference doesn’t matter for what will follow.

Setup

So, we need a container for the data. You can use any of the following options for storage:

  • A free disk device
  • A free partition
  • An empty LVM logical volume
  • A file

The easiest solution is to use a file, and so that’s what I’ll use here. A file is not the fastest and most efficient storage, but it is fine for our hands-on. In production, please use real devices. A more realistic server configuration will be discussed in a future post. The following steps are identical on Ubuntu and Centos. The first step is to create the storage file. I’ll use a file of 1~GB in /mnt. Adjust the size and path to whatever suits the resources you have:

[root@Centos7 ~]# dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/zfs.img bs=1024 count=1048576

The result is a 1GB file in /mnt:

[root@Centos7 ~]# ls -lh /mnt
total 1,0G
-rw-r--r--.  1 root root 1,0G 16 nov 16:50 zfs.img

Now, we will create our ZFS pool, mysqldata, using the file we just created:

[root@Centos7 ~]# modprobe zfs
[root@Centos7 ~]# zpool create mysqldata /mnt/zfs.img
[root@Centos7 ~]# zpool status
  pool: mysqldata
 state: ONLINE
  scan: none requested
config:
        NAME            STATE     READ WRITE CKSUM
        mysqldata       ONLINE       0     0     0
          /mnt/zfs.img  ONLINE       0     0     0
errors: No known data errors
[root@Centos7 ~]# zfs list
NAME        USED  AVAIL  REFER  MOUNTPOINT
mysqldata  79,5K   880M    24K  /mysqldata

If you have a result similar to the above, congratulations, you have a ZFS pool. If you put files in /mysqldata, they are in ZFS.

MySQL installation

Now, let’s install MySQL and play around a bit. We’ll begin by installing the Percona repository:

root@Ubuntu1604:~# cd /tmp
root@Ubuntu1604:/tmp# wget https://repo.percona.com/apt/percona-release_0.1-4.$(lsb_release -sc)_all.deb
root@Ubuntu1604:/tmp# dpkg -i percona-release_*.deb
root@Ubuntu1604:/tmp# apt-get update
[root@Centos7 ~]# yum install http://www.percona.com/downloads/percona-release/redhat/0.1-4/percona-release-0.1-4.noarch.rpm

Next, we install Percona Server for MySQL 5.7:

root@Ubuntu1604:~# apt-get install percona-server-server-5.7
root@Ubuntu1604:~# systemctl start mysql
[root@Centos7 ~]# yum install Percona-Server-server-57
[root@Centos7 ~]# systemctl start mysql

The installation command pulls all the dependencies and sets up the MySQL root password. On Ubuntu, the install script asks for the password, but on Centos7 a random password is set. To retrieve the random password:

[root@Centos7 ~]# grep password /var/log/mysqld.log
2017-11-21T18:37:52.435067Z 1 [Note] A temporary password is generated for root@localhost: XayhVloV+9g+

The following step is to reset the root password:

[root@Centos7 ~]# mysql -p -e "ALTER USER 'root'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'Mysql57OnZfs_';"
Enter password:

Since 5.7.15, the password validation plugin by defaults requires a length greater than 8, mixed cases, at least one digit and at least one special character. On either Linux distributions, I suggest you set the credentials in the /root/.my.cnf file like this:

[# cat /root/.my.cnf
[client]
user=root
password=Mysql57OnZfs_

MySQL configuration for ZFS

Now that we have both ZFS and MySQL, we need some configuration to make them play together. From here, the steps are the same on Ubuntu and Centos. First, we stop MySQL:

# systemctl stop mysql

Then, we’ll configure ZFS. We will create three ZFS filesystems in our pool:

  • mysql will be the top level filesystem for the MySQL related data. This filesystem will not directly have data in it, but data will be stored in the other filesystems that we create. The utility of the mysql filesystem will become obvious when we talk about snapshots. Something to keep in mind for the next steps, the properties of a filesystem are by default inherited from the upper level.
  • mysql/data will be the actual datadir. The files in the datadir are mostly accessed through random IO operations, so we’ll set the ZFS recordsize to match the InnoDB page size.
  • mysql/log will be where the log files will be stored. By log files, I primarily mean the InnoDB log files. But the binary log file, the slow query log and the error log will all be stored in that directory. The log files are accessed through sequential IO operations. We’ll thus use a bigger ZFS recordsize in order to maximize the compression efficiency.

Let’s begin with the top-level MySQL container. I could have used directly mysqldata, but that would somewhat limit us. The following steps create the filesystem and set some properties:

# zfs create mysqldata/mysql
# zfs set compression=gzip mysqldata/mysql
# zfs set recordsize=128k mysqldata/mysql
# zfs set atime=off mysqldata/mysql

I just set compression to ‘gzip’ (the equivalent of gzip level 6), recordsize to 128KB and atime (the file’s access time) to off. Once we are done with the mysql filesystem, we can proceed with the data and log filesystems:

# zfs create mysqldata/mysql/log
# zfs create mysqldata/mysql/data
# zfs set recordsize=16k mysqldata/mysql/data
# zfs set primarycache=metadata mysqldata/mysql/data
# zfs get compression,recordsize,atime mysqldata/mysql/data
NAME                  PROPERTY     VALUE     SOURCE
mysqldata/mysql/data  compression  gzip      inherited from mysqldata/mysql
mysqldata/mysql/data  recordsize   16K       local
mysqldata/mysql/data  atime        off       inherited from mysqldata/mysql

Of course, there are other properties that could be set, but let’s keep things simple. Now that the filesystems are ready, let’s move the files to ZFS (make sure you stopped MySQL):

# mv /var/lib/mysql/ib_logfile* /mysqldata/mysql/log/
# mv /var/lib/mysql/* /mysqldata/mysql/data/

and then set the real mount points:

# zfs set mountpoint=/var/lib/mysql mysqldata/mysql/data
# zfs set mountpoint=/var/lib/mysql-log mysqldata/mysql/log
# chown mysql.mysql /var/lib/mysql /var/lib/mysql-log

Now we have:

# zfs list
NAME                   USED  AVAIL  REFER  MOUNTPOINT
mysqldata             1,66M   878M  25,5K  /mysqldata
mysqldata/mysql       1,54M   878M    25K  /mysqldata/mysql
mysqldata/mysql/data   890K   878M   890K  /var/lib/mysql
mysqldata/mysql/log    662K   878M   662K  /var/lib/mysql-log

We must adjust the MySQL configuration accordingly. Here’s what I put in my /etc/my.cnf file (/etc/mysql/my.cnf on Ubuntu):

[mysqld]
datadir=/var/lib/mysql
innodb_log_group_home_dir = /var/lib/mysql-log
innodb_doublewrite = 0
innodb_checksum_algorithm = none
slow_query_log = /var/lib/mysql-log/slow.log
log-error = /var/lib/mysql-log/error.log
server_id = 12345
log_bin = /var/lib/mysql-log/binlog
relay_log=/var/lib/mysql-log/relay-bin
expire_logs_days=7
socket=/var/lib/mysql/mysql.sock
# Disabling symbolic-links is recommended to prevent assorted security risks
symbolic-links=0
pid-file=/var/run/mysqld/mysqld.pid

On Centos 7, selinux prevented MySQL from accessing files in /var/lib/mysql-log. I had to perform the following steps:

[root@Centos7 ~]# yum install policycoreutils-python
[root@Centos7 ~]# semanage fcontext -a -t mysqld_db_t "/var/lib/mysql-log(/.*)?"
[root@Centos7 ~]# chcon -Rv --type=mysqld_db_t /var/lib/mysql-log/

I could have just disabled selinux since it is a test server, but if I don’t get my hands dirty on selinux once in a while with semanage and chcon I will not remember how to do it. Selinux is an important security tool on Linux (but that’s another story).

At this point, feel free to start using your test MySQL database on ZFS.

Monitoring ZFS

To monitor ZFS, you can use the zpool command like this:

[root@Centos7 ~]# zpool iostat 3
              capacity     operations     bandwidth
pool        alloc   free   read  write   read  write
----------  -----  -----  -----  -----  -----  -----
mysqldata   19,6M   988M      0      0      0    290
mysqldata   19,3M   989M      0     44      0  1,66M
mysqldata   23,4M   985M      0     49      0  1,33M
mysqldata   23,4M   985M      0     40      0   694K
mysqldata   26,7M   981M      0     39      0   561K
mysqldata   26,7M   981M      0     37      0   776K
mysqldata   23,8M   984M      0     43      0   634K

This shows the ZFS activity while I was loading some data. Also, the following command gives you an estimate of the compression ratio:

[root@Centos7 ~]# zfs get compressratio,used,logicalused mysqldata/mysql
NAME             PROPERTY       VALUE  SOURCE
mysqldata/mysql  compressratio  4.10x  -
mysqldata/mysql  used           116M   -
mysqldata/mysql  logicalused    469M   -
[root@Centos7 ~]# zfs get compressratio,used,logicalused mysqldata/mysql/data
NAME                  PROPERTY       VALUE  SOURCE
mysqldata/mysql/data  compressratio  4.03x  -
mysqldata/mysql/data  used           67,9M  -
mysqldata/mysql/data  logicalused    268M   -
[root@Centos7 ~]# zfs get compressratio,used,logicalused mysqldata/mysql/log
NAME                 PROPERTY       VALUE  SOURCE
mysqldata/mysql/log  compressratio  4.21x  -
mysqldata/mysql/log  used           47,8M  -
mysqldata/mysql/log  logicalused    201M   -

In my case, the dataset compresses very well (4x). Another way to see how files are compressed is to use ls and du. ls returns the actual uncompressed size of the file, while du returns the compressed size. Here’s an example:

[root@Centos7 mysql]# -lah ibdata1
-rw-rw---- 1 mysql mysql 90M nov 24 16:09 ibdata1
[root@Centos7 mysql]# du -hs ibdata1
14M     ibdata1

I really invite you to further experiment and get a feeling of how ZFS and MySQL behave together.

Snapshots and backups

A great feature of ZFS that work really well with MySQL are snapshots. A snapshot is a consistent view of the filesystem at a given point in time. Normally, it is best to perform a snapshot while a flush tables with read lock is held. That allows you to record the master position, and also to flush MyISAM tables. It is quite easy to do that. Here’s how I create a snapshot with MySQL:

[root@Centos7 ~]# mysql -e 'flush tables with read lock;show master status;! zfs snapshot -r mysqldata/mysql@my_first_snapshot'
+---------------+-----------+--------------+------------------+-------------------+
| File          | Position  | Binlog_Do_DB | Binlog_Ignore_DB | Executed_Gtid_Set |
+---------------+-----------+--------------+------------------+-------------------+
| binlog.000002 | 110295083 |              |                  |                   |
+---------------+-----------+--------------+------------------+-------------------+
[root@Centos7 ~]# zfs list -t snapshot
NAME                                     USED  AVAIL  REFER  MOUNTPOINT
mysqldata/mysql@my_first_snapshot          0B      -    24K  -
mysqldata/mysql/data@my_first_snapshot     0B      -  67,9M  -
mysqldata/mysql/log@my_first_snapshot      0B      -  47,8M  -

The command took about 1s. The only time where such commands would take more time is when there are MyISAM tables with a lot of pending updates to the indices, or when there are long running transactions. You probably wonder why the “USED” column reports 0B. That’s simply because there were no changes to the filesystem since the snapshot was created. It is a measure of the amount of data that hasn’t been free because the snapshot requires the data. Said otherwise, it how far the snapshot has diverged from its parent. You can access the snapshot through a clone or through ZFS as a file system. To access the snapshot through ZFS, you have to set the snapdir parameter to “visible, ” and then you can see the files. Here’s how:

[root@Centos7 ~]# zfs set snapdir=visible mysqldata/mysql/data
[root@Centos7 ~]# zfs set snapdir=visible mysqldata/mysql/log
[root@Centos7 ~]# ls /var/lib/mysql-log/.zfs/snapshot/my_first_snapshot/
binlog.000001  binlog.000002  binlog.index  error.log  ib_logfile0  ib_logfile1

The files in the snapshot directory are read-only. If you want to be able to write to the files, you first need to clone the snapshots:

[root@Centos7 ~]# zfs create mysqldata/mysqlslave
[root@Centos7 ~]# zfs clone mysqldata/mysql/data@my_first_snapshot mysqldata/mysqlslave/data
[root@Centos7 ~]# zfs clone mysqldata/mysql/log@my_first_snapshot mysqldata/mysqlslave/log
[root@Centos7 ~]# zfs list
NAME                        USED  AVAIL  REFER  MOUNTPOINT
mysqldata                   116M   764M    26K  /mysqldata
mysqldata/mysql             116M   764M    24K  /mysqldata/mysql
mysqldata/mysql/data       67,9M   764M  67,9M  /var/lib/mysql
mysqldata/mysql/log        47,8M   764M  47,8M  /var/lib/mysql-log
mysqldata/mysqlslave         28K   764M    26K  /mysqldata/mysqlslave
mysqldata/mysqlslave/data     1K   764M  67,9M  /mysqldata/mysqlslave/data
mysqldata/mysqlslave/log      1K   764M  47,8M  /mysqldata/mysqlslave/log

At this point, it is up to you to use the clones to spin up a local slave. Like for the snapshots, the clone only grows in size when actual data is written to it. ZFS records that haven’t changed since the snapshot was taken are shared. That’s a huge space savings. For a customer, I once wrote a script to automatically create five MySQL slaves for their developers. The developers would do tests, and often replication broke. Rerunning the script would recreate fresh slaves in a matter of a few minutes. My ZFS snapshot script and the script I wrote to create the clone based slaves are available here: https://github.com/y-trudeau/Yves-zfs-tools

Optional features

In the previous post, I talked about a SLOG device for the ZIL and the L2ARC, a disk extension of the ARC cache. If you promise to never use the following trick in production, here’s how to speed MySQL on ZFS drastically:

[root@Centos7 ~]# dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/shm/zil_slog.img bs=1024 count=131072
131072+0 enregistrements lus
131072+0 enregistrements écrits
134217728 octets (134 MB) copiés, 0,373809 s, 359 MB/s
[root@Centos7 ~]# zpool add mysqldata log /dev/shm/zil_slog.img
[root@Centos7 ~]# zpool status
  pool: mysqldata
 state: ONLINE
  scan: none requested
config:
        NAME                     STATE     READ WRITE CKSUM
        mysqldata                ONLINE       0     0     0
          /mnt/zfs.img           ONLINE       0     0     0
        logs
          /dev/shm/zil_slog.img  ONLINE       0     0     0
errors: No known data errors

The data in the SLOG is critical for ZFS recovery. I performed some tests with virtual machines, and if you crash the server and lose the SLOG you may lose all the data stored in the ZFS pool. Normally, the SLOG is on a mirror in order to lower the risk of losing it. The SLOG can be added and removed online.

I know I asked you to promise to never use an shm file as SLOG in production. Actually, there are exceptions. I would not hesitate to temporarily use such a trick to speed up a lagging slave. Another situation where such a trick could be used is with Percona XtraDB Cluster. With a cluster, there are multiple copies of the dataset. Even if one node crashed and lost its ZFS filesystems, it could easily be reconfigured and reprovisioned from the surviving nodes.

The other optional feature I want to cover is a cache device. The cache device is what is used for the L2ARC. The content of the L2ARC is compressed as the original data is compressed. To add a cache device (again an shm file), do:

[root@Centos7 ~]# dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/shm/l2arc.img bs=1024 count=131072
131072+0 enregistrements lus
131072+0 enregistrements écrits
134217728 octets (134 MB) copiés, 0,272323 s, 493 MB/s
[root@Centos7 ~]# zpool add mysqldata cache /dev/shm/l2arc.img
[root@Centos7 ~]# zpool status
  pool: mysqldata
 state: ONLINE
  scan: none requested
config:
    NAME                     STATE     READ WRITE CKSUM
    mysqldata                ONLINE       0     0     0
      /mnt/zfs.img           ONLINE       0     0     0
    logs
      /dev/shm/zil_slog.img  ONLINE       0     0     0
    cache
      /dev/shm/l2arc.img     ONLINE       0     0     0
errors: No known data errors

To monitor the L2ARC (and also the ARC), look at the file: /proc/spl/kstat/zfs/arcstats. As the ZFS filesystems are configured right now, very little will go to the L2ARC. This can be frustrating. The reason is that the L2ARC is filled by the elements evicted from the ARC. If you recall, we have set primarycache=metatdata for the filesystem containing the actual data. Hence, in order to get some data to our L2ARC, I suggest the following steps:

[root@Centos7 ~]# zfs set primarycache=all mysqldata/mysql/data
[root@Centos7 ~]# echo 67108864 > /sys/module/zfs/parameters/zfs_arc_max
[root@Centos7 ~]# echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches
[root@Centos7 ~]# grep '^size' /proc/spl/kstat/zfs/arcstats
size                            4    65097584

It takes the echo command to drop_caches to force a re-initialization of the ARC. Now, InnoDB data starts to be cached in the L2ARC. The way data is sent to the L2ARC has many tunables, which I won’t discuss here. I chose 64MB for the ARC size mainly because I am using a low memory VM. A size of 64MB is aggressively small and will slow down ZFS if the metadata doesn’t fit in the ARC. Normally you should use a larger value. The actual good size depends on many parameters like the filesystem system size, the number of files and the presence of a L2ARC. You can monitor the ARC and L2ARC using the arcstat tool that comes with ZFS on Linux (when you use Centos 7). With Ubuntu, download the tool from here.

Removal

So the ZFS party is over? We need to clean up the mess! Let’s begin:

[root@Centos7 ~]# systemctl stop mysql
[root@Centos7 ~]# zpool remove /dev/shm/l2arc.img
[root@Centos7 ~]# zpool remove mysqldata /dev/shm/zil_slog.img
[root@Centos7 ~]# rm -f /dev/shm/*.img
[root@Centos7 ~]# zpool destroy mysqldata
[root@Centos7 ~]# rm -f /mnt/zfs.img
[root@Centos7 ~]# yum erase spl kmod-spl libzpool2 libzfs2 kmod-zfs zfs

The last step is different on Ubuntu:

root@Ubuntu1604:~# apt-get remove spl-dkms zfs-dkms libzpool2linux libzfs2linux spl zfsutils-linux zfs-zed

Conclusion

With this guide, I hope I provided a positive first experience in using ZFS with MySQL. The configuration is simple, and not optimized for performance. However, we’ll look at more realistic configurations in future posts.

Nov
01
2017
--

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2.17-3.8 Is Now Available

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2Percona announces the release of Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2.17-3.8 on October 31, 2017. Download the latest version from the Percona web site or the Percona Software Repositories.

Percona Server for MongoDB is an enhanced, open-source, fully compatible, highly scalable, zero-maintenance downtime database that supports the MongoDB v3.2 protocol and drivers. It extends MongoDB with MongoRocksPercona Memory Engine and PerconaFT storage engine, as well as enterprise-grade features like External Authentication, Audit Logging, Profiling Rate Limiting, and Hot Backup at no extra cost. The software requires no changes to MongoDB applications or code.

NOTE: The PerconaFT storage engine is deprecated as of 3.2. It is no longer supported and isn’t available in higher version releases.

This release is based on MongoDB 3.2.17 and does not include any additional changes.

The Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2.17-3.8 release notes are available in the official documentation.

Sep
27
2017
--

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2.16-3.7 Is Now Available

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2Percona announces the release of Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2.16-3.7 on September 27, 2017. Download the latest version from the Percona web site or the Percona Software Repositories.

Percona Server for MongoDB is an enhanced, open-source, fully compatible, highly scalable, zero-maintenance downtime database that supports the MongoDB v3.2 protocol and drivers. It extends MongoDB with MongoRocksPercona Memory Engine and PerconaFT storage engine, as well as enterprise-grade features like External Authentication, Audit Logging, Profiling Rate Limiting, and Hot Backup at no extra cost. The software requires no changes to MongoDB applications or code.

NOTE: The PerconaFT storage engine is deprecated as of 3.4. It is no longer supported and isn’t available in higher version releases.

This release is based on MongoDB 3.2.16 and includes the following additional changes:

  • #PSMDB-164: Fixed MongoRocks failure to repair if database metadata is inconsistent with dropped collections and indexes.
  • Added packages for Debian 9 (“stretch”).

The Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2.16-3.7 release notes are available in the official documentation.

Sep
13
2017
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Massive Parallel Log Processing with ClickHouse

ClickHouse

In this blog, I’ll look at how to use ClickHouse for parallel log processing.

Percona is seen primarily for our expertise in MySQL and MongoDB (at this time), but neither is quite suitable to perform heavy analytical workloads. There is a need to analyze data sets, and a very popular task is crunching log files. Below I’ll show how ClickHouse can be used to efficiently perform this task. ClickHouse is attractive because it has multi-core parallel query processing, and it can even execute a single query using multiple CPUs in the background.

I am going to check how ClickHouse utilizes multiple CPU cores and threads. I will use a server with two sockets, equipped with “Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5-2683 v3 @ 2.00GHz” in each. That gives a total of 28 CPU cores / 56 CPU threads.

To analyze workload, I’ll use an Apache log file from one of Percona’s servers. The log has 1.56 billion rows, and uncompressed it takes 274G. When inserted into ClickHouse, the table on disk takes 9G.

How do we insert the data into ClickHouse? There is a lot of scripts to transform Apache log format to CSV, which ClickHouse can accept. As for the base, I used this one:

https://gist.github.com/sepehr/fff4d777509fa7834531

and my modification you can find here:

https://github.com/vadimtk/clickhouse-misc/blob/master/apachelog-to-csv.pl

The ClickHouse table definition:

CREATE TABLE default.apachelog ( remote_host String, user String, access_date Date, access_time DateTime, timezone String, request_method String, request_uri String, status UInt32, bytes UInt32, referer String, user_agent String) ENGINE = MergeTree(access_date, remote_host, 8192)

To test how ClickHouse scales on multiple CPU cores/threads, I will execute the same query by allocating from 1 to 56 CPU threads for ClickHouse processes. This can be done as:

ps -eLo cmd,tid | grep clickhouse-server | perl -pe 's/.* (d+)$/1/' | xargs -n 1 taskset -cp 0-$i

where $i is (N CPUs-1).

We must also take into account that not all queries are equal. Some are easier to execute in parallel than others. So I will test three different queries. In the end, we can’t get around Amdahl’s Law!

The first query should be easy to execute in parallel:

select extract(request_uri,'(w+)$') p,sum(bytes) sm,count(*) c from apachelog group by p order by c desc limit 100

Speedup:

CPUs Time, sec Speedup to 1 CPU
1 823.646 1
2 413.832 1.990291
3 274.548 3.000007
4 205.961 3.999039
5 164.997 4.991885
6 137.455 5.992114
7 118.079 6.975381
8 103.015 7.995399
9 92.01 8.951701
10 82.853 9.941052
11 75.334 10.93326
12 69.23 11.89724
13 63.848 12.90011
14 59.388 13.8689
15 55.433 14.85841
16 52.158 15.79136
17 49.054 16.7906
18 46.331 17.77743
19 43.985 18.72561
20 41.795 19.70681
21 39.763 20.71388
22 38.031 21.65723
23 36.347 22.66063
24 34.917 23.58868
25 33.626 24.49432
26 32.42 25.40549
27 31.21 26.39045
28 30.135 27.33187
29 29.947 27.50346
30 29.709 27.72379
31 29.283 28.1271
32 28.979 28.42217
33 28.807 28.59187
34 28.477 28.9232
35 28.146 29.26334
36 27.921 29.49916
37 27.613 29.8282
38 27.366 30.09742
39 27.06 30.43777
40 26.817 30.71358
41 26.644 30.913
42 26.394 31.2058
43 26.215 31.41888
44 25.994 31.686
45 25.762 31.97135
46 25.554 32.23159
47 25.243 32.62869
48 25.102 32.81197
49 24.946 33.01716
50 24.668 33.38925
51 24.537 33.56751
52 24.278 33.92561
53 24.035 34.26861
54 23.839 34.55036
55 23.734 34.70321
56 23.587 34.91949

 

It’s much more interesting to chart these results:

From the chart, we can see that the query scales linearly up to 28 cores. After that, it continues to scale up to 56 threads (but with a lesser slope). I think this is related to the CPU architecture (remember we have 28 physical cores and 56 CPU “threads”). Let’s look at the results again. With one available CPU, the query took 823.6 sec to execute. With all available CPUs, it took 23.6 sec. So the total speedup is 34.9 times.

But let’s consider a query that allows a lesser degree of parallelism. For example, this one:

select access_date c2, count(distinct request_uri) cnt from apachelog group by c2 order by c2 limit 300

This query uses aggregation that counts unique URIs, which I am sure limits the counting process to a single shared structure. So some part of the execution is limited to a single process. I won’t show the full results for all 1 to 56 CPUs, but for one CPU the execution time is 177.715 sec, and for 56 CPUs the execution time is 11.564 sec. The total speedup is 15.4 times.

The speedup chart looks like this:

As we suspected, this query allows less parallelism. What about even heavier queries? Let’s consider this one:

SELECT y, request_uri, cnt FROM (SELECT access_date y, request_uri, count(*) AS cnt FROM apachelog GROUP BY y, request_uri ORDER BY y ASC ) ORDER BY y,cnt DESC LIMIT 1 BY y

In that query, we build a derived table (to resolve the subquery) and I expect it will limit the parallelism even further. And it does: with one CPU the query takes 183.063 sec to execute. With 56 CPUs it takes 28.572 sec. So the speedup is only 6.4 times.

The chart is:

Conclusions

ClickHouse can capably utilize multiple CPU cores available on the server, and query execution is not limited by a single CPU (like in MySQL). The degree of parallelism is defined by the complexity of the query, and in the best case scenario, we see linear scalability with the number of CPU cores. For the scaling on multiple servers you can see my previous post:

https://www.percona.com/blog/2017/06/22/clickhouse-general-analytical-workload-based-star-schema-benchmark/

However, if query execution is serial, it limits the speedup (as described in Amdahl’s Law).

One example is a 1.5 billion record Apache log, and we can see that ClickHouse can execute complex analytical queries within tens of seconds.

Aug
18
2017
--

This Week in Data with Colin Charles: Percona Live Europe!

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

Has a week passed already? Welcome back to the second column. A lot of time has been spent neck deep in getting speakers accepted and scheduled for Percona Live Open Source Database Conference Europe 2017 in Dublin, as well organizing the conference sponsors.

Percona Live Europe Dublin

Percona Live Europe Colin CharlesAt the time of writing, we are six weeks away from the conference, so a little over a month! Have you registered yet?

We have 12 tutorials that cover a wide range of topics: ProxySQL (from the author Rene Cannao), Orchestrator (from the author Shlomi Noach), practical Couchbase (to name a few). If we did a technology word cloud, the coverage includes MongoDB, Docker, Elastic, Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM), Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7, MySQL InnoDB Cluster and Group Replication.

In addition to that, if you’re a MySQL beginner (or thinking of a career change) there is a six-hour boot camp titled MySQL in a Nutshell (Part 1 and Part 2)!. Come prepared with your laptop, and leave a MySQL DBA!

Sessions are scheduled, and most of the content is already online: check out day 1, and day 2. We have 104 sessions scheduled, so there’s plenty to choose from.

Remember that you have till 7:00 a.m. UTC-1, August 16th, 2017 to book the group rate at the event venue for €250/night. Use code PERCON.

Releases

  • orchestrator/raft: Pre-release 3.0 is available. I’m a huge fan of Orchestrator, and now you can setup high availability for orchestrator via the Raft consensus protocol.
  • MariaDB 10.0.32 is out, and it comes with a new Percona XtraDB, Percona TokuDB and a new InnoDB. You’ll want this release if you’re using TokuDB, as it merges from TokuDB 5.6.36-82.1 (which fixes the two issues problem).
  • If you encountered the TokuDB problems above, you’ll want to look at MariaDB 10.1.26. One surprise hidden in the release notes: MariaDB Backup is now a stable/GA release. Have you used it yet?

Link List

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or I’m @bytebot on Twitter.

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