Aug
09
2017
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Red Hat updates OpenShift container platform with new service catalog

 Red Hat issued its quarterly update to the OpenShift platform today, adding among other things, a Service Catalog that enables IT or third-party vendors to create connections to internal or external services. OpenShift is RedHat’s Platform as a Service, based on Kubernetes, the open source container management platform, which was originally developed by Google. It also supports Docker,… Read More

Jul
31
2017
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Platform End of Life (EOL) Announcement for RHEL 5 and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS

End of Life

End of LifeUpstream platform vendors have announced the general end of life (EOL) for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 (RHEL 5) and its derivatives, as well as Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. With this announcement comes some implications to support for Percona software running on these operating systems.

RHEL 5 was EOL as of March 31st, 2017 and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS was end of life as of April 28th, 2017. Pursuant to our end of life policies, we are announcing that these EOLs will go into effect for Percona software on August 1st, 2017. As of this date, we will no longer be producing new packages, binary builds, hotfixes, or bug fixes for Percona software on these platforms.

We generally align our platform end of life dates with those of the upstream platform vendor. The platform end of life dates are published in advance on our website under the page Supported Linux Platforms and Versions.

Per our policies, Percona will continue to provide operational support for your databases on EOLed platforms. However, we will be unable to provide any bug fixes, builds or OS-level assistance if you encounter an issue outside the database itself.

Each platform vendor has a supported migration or upgrade path to their next major release.  Please reach out to us if you need assistance in migrating your database to your vendor’s supported platform – Percona will be happy to assist you.

May
25
2017
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Red Hat to acquire Codenvy as part of its growing container strategy

 Red Hat, which has made its name as the enterprise Linux company, has been making clear in recent years that it sees the cloud and containerization as a significant part of its future. Today, it announced its intent to acquire San Francisco startup Codenvy to continue building on that strategy and give developers access to a cloud-based integrated development environment. The company did… Read More

Apr
27
2017
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Percona Live 2017: Hawkular Metrics, An Overview

Hawkular Metrics

Hawkular MetricsThe place is still frantic here at Percona Live 2017 as everybody tries to squeeze in a few more talks before the end of the day. One such talk was given by Red Hat’s Stefan Negrea on Hawkular Metrics.

Hawkular Metrics is a scalable, long-term, high-performance storage engine for metric data. The session was an overview of the project that includes the history of the project, an overview of the Hawkular ecosystem, technical details of the project, developer features and APIs and third party integrations.

Hawkular Metrics is backed by Cassandra for scalability. Hawkular Metrics is used and exposed by Hawkular Services.The API uses JSON to communicate with clients.

Users of Hawkular Metrics include:

  • IoT enthusiasts who need to collect metrics, and possibly trigger alerts
  • Operators who are looking for a solution to store metrics from statsD, collectd, syslog
  • Developers of solutions who need long-term time series database storage
  • Users of ManageIQ who are looking for Middleware management
  • Users of Kubernetes/Heapster who want to store Docker container metrics in a long-term time series database storage, thanks to the Heapster sink for Hawkular.

Stefan was kind enough to speak with me after the talk. Check it out below:

There are more talks today. Check out Thursday’s schedule here. Don’t forget to attend the Closing Remarks and prize give away at 4:00 pm.

Aug
09
2016
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Mirantis and SUSE team up to give OpenStack users new support options

IMG_20160809_103941 Mirantis, which specializes in offering software, support and training for running OpenStack, today announced that it is partnering with Germany-based SUSE, best known for its Linux distribution, to offer its customers support for SUSE’s enterprise Linux offering. The two companies also said that they will work on making SUSE Linux Enterprise Server a development platform for use… Read More

Jul
05
2016
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LzLabs launches product to move mainframe COBOL code to Linux cloud

Black white photo of man sitting in front of a mainframe computer in the 1960s Somewhere in a world full of advanced technology that we write about regularly here on TechCrunch, there exists an ancient realm where mainframe computers are still running programs written in COBOL.
This is a programming language, mind you, that was developed in the late 1950s, and used widely in the ’60s and ’70s and even into the ’80s, but it’s never really gone away. Read More

Jun
21
2016
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As Red Hat aims for $5 billion in revenue, Linux won’t be only driver

Red Hat race car with #1 painted on top. Last year Red Hat, which has been mostly known for selling Linux in the enterprise became the first $2 billion open source company. Now it wants to be the first to $5 billion, but it might not be just Linux that gets it there. A couple of years ago Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst recognized, even in the face of rising revenue, that the company couldn’t continue growing forever… Read More

Apr
05
2016
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Mirantis scores huge OpenStack win with VW

VW logo on car. Mirantis, one of the last pure play OpenStack startups left standing announced a major win today when VW chose them over Red Hat for an enormous OpenStack implementation. It was huge for Mirantis and for the open source OpenStack project. VW knew it wanted to run a private cloud on OpenStack. The only question was the vendor. After a call for requests for proposals it came down to two:… Read More

Apr
04
2016
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Data in the Cloud track at Percona Live with Brent Compton and Ross Turk: The Data Performance Cloud

12 Days Until Percona Live

Data in the Cloud Track at Percona LiveIn this blog, we’ll discuss the Data in the Cloud track at Percona Live with Red Hat’s Brent Compton and Ross Turk.

Welcome to another interview with the Percona Live Data Performance Conference speakers and presenters. This series of blog posts will highlight some of the talks and presentations available at Percona Live Data Performance Conference April 18-21 in Santa Clara. Read through to the end for a discounts for Percona Live registration.

(A webinar sneak preview of their “MySQL on Ceph” cloud storage talk is happening on Wednesday, April 6th at 2 pm EDT. You can register for it here – all attendees will receive a special $200 discount code for Percona Live registration after the webinar! See the end of this blog post for more details!)

First, we need to establish some context. Data storage has traditionally, and for most of its existence, pretty much followed a consistent model: stable and fairly static big box devices that were purpose-built to house data. Needing more storage space meant obtaining more (or bigger) boxes. Classic scale-up storage. Need more, go to the data storage vendor and order a bigger box.

The problem is that data is exploding, and has been exponentially for the last decade. Some estimates put the amount of data being generated worldwide increasing at a rate of 40%-60% per year. That kind of increase, and at that speed, doesn’t leave a lot of ramp up time to make long term big box hardware investments. Things are changing too fast.

The immediate trend – evident by declining revenues of class storage boxes – is placing data in a cloud of scale-out storage. What is the cloud? Since that question has whole books devoted to it, let’s try to simplify it a bit.

Cloud computing benefits include scalability, instantaneous configuration, virtualized consumables and the ability to quickly expand base specifications. Moving workloads to the cloud brings with it numerous business benefits, including agility, focus and cost:

  • Agility. The cloud enables businesses to react to changing needs. As the workload grows or spikes, just add compute cycles, storage, and bandwidth with the click of a mouse.
  • Focus. Deploying workloads to the cloud enables companies to focus more resources on business-critical activities, rather than system administration.
  • Cost. Businesses can pay as they go for the services level they need. Planning and sinking money into long-term plans that may or may not pan out is not as big a problem.

When it comes to moving workloads into the cloud, the low throughput applications were the obvious first choice: email, non-critical business functions, team collaboration assistance. These generally are neither mission critical, nor require high levels of security. As applications driven services became more and more prevalent (think Netflix, Facebook, Instagram), more throughput intensive services were moved to the cloud – mainly for flexibility during service spikes and to accommodate increased users. But tried and true high-performance workloads like databases and other corporate kingdoms that have perceived higher security requirements have traditionally remained stuck in the old infrastructures that have served well – until now.

So what is this all leading to? Well, according to Brent and Ross, ALL data will eventually be going to the cloud, and the old models of storage infrastructure are falling by the wayside. Between the lack of elasticity and scalability of purpose-built hardware, and the oncoming storage crisis, database storage is headed for cloud services solutions.

I had some time to talk with Brent and Ross about data in the cloud, and what we can expect regarding a new data performance cloud model.

Percona: There is always a lot of talk about public versus private paradigms when it comes to cloud discussions. To you, this is fairly inconsequential. How do see “the cloud?” How would you define it terms of infrastructure for workloads?

RHT: Red Hat has long provided software for hybrid clouds, with the understanding that most companies will use a mix of public cloud and private cloud infrastructure for their workloads. This means that Red Hat software is supported both on popular public cloud platforms (such as AWS, Azure, and GCE) as well as on-premise platforms (such as OpenStack private clouds). Our work with Percona in providing a reference architecture for MySQL running on Ceph is all about giving app developers a comparable, deterministic experience when running their MySQL-based apps on a Ceph private storage cloud v. running them in the public cloud.

Percona: So, your contention is that ALL data is headed to the cloud. What are the factors that are going ramp up this trend? What level of information storage will cement this as inevitable?

RHT:  We’d probably restate this to “most data is headed to A cloud.” Two distinctions being made in this statement. The first is “most” versus “all” data.  For years to come, there will be late adopters with on-premise data NOT being served through a private cloud infrastructure. The second distinction is “a” cloud versus “the” cloud.  “A” cloud means either a public cloud or a private cloud (or some hybrid of the two). Private clouds are being constructed by the world’s most advanced companies within their own data centers to provide a similar type of elastic infrastructure with dynamic provisioning and lower CAPEX/OPEX costs (as is found in public clouds).

Percona: What are the concerns you see with moving all workloads to the cloud, and how would you address those concerns?

RHT:  The distinctions laid out in the previous answer address this. For myriad reasons, some data and workloads will reside on-premise within private clouds for a very long time. In fact, as the technology matures for building private clouds (as we’re seeing with OpenStack and Ceph), and can offer many of the same benefits as public clouds, we see the market reaching an equilibrium of sorts. In this equilibrium many of the agility, flexibility, and cost benefits once available only through public cloud services will be matched by private cloud installations. This will re-base the public versus private cloud discussion to fewer, simpler trade-offs – such as which data must reside on-premises to meet an enterprise’s data governance and control requirements.

Percona: So you mentioned the “Data Performance Cloud”? How would you describe that that is, and how it affects enterprises?

RHT:  For many enterprises, data performance workloads have been the last category of workloads to move a cloud, whether public or private. Public cloud services, such as AWS Relational Database Service with Provisioned-IOPS storage, have illustrated improved data performance for many workloads once relegated to the cloud sidelines. Now, with guidelines in the reference architecture being produced by Percona and the Red Hat Ceph team, customers can achieve comparable data performance on their private Ceph storage clouds as they do with high-performance public cloud services.

Percona: What can people expect to get out of the Data in the Cloud track at Percona Live this year?

RHT: Architecture guidelines for building and optimizing MySQL databases on a Ceph private storage cloud.   These architectures will include public cloud benefits along with private cloud control and governance.

Want to find out more about MySQL, Ceph, and Data in the Cloud? Register for Percona Live Data Performance Conference 2016, and see Red Hat’s sponsored Data in the Cloud Keynote Panel: Cloudy with a chance of running out of disk space? Or Sunny times ahead? Use the code “FeaturedTalk” and receive $100 off the current registration price!

The Percona Live Data Performance Conference is the premier open source event for the data performance ecosystem. It is the place to be for the open source community as well as businesses that thrive in the MySQL, NoSQL, cloud, big data and Internet of Things (IoT) marketplaces. Attendees include DBAs, sysadmins, developers, architects, CTOs, CEOs, and vendors from around the world.

The Percona Live Data Performance Conference will be April 18-21 at the Hyatt Regency Santa Clara & The Santa Clara Convention Center.

MySQL and Ceph: Database-as-a-Service sneak preview

Businesses are familiar with running a Database-as-a-Service (DBaaS) in the public cloud. They enjoy the benefits of on-demand infrastructure for spinning-up lots of MySQL instances with predictable performance, without the headaches of managing them on specific, bare-metal highly available clusters.

This webinar lays the foundation for building a DBaaS on your own private cloud, enabled by Red Hat® Ceph Storage. Join senior architects from Red Hat and Percona for reference architecture tips and head-to-head performance results of MySQL on Ceph versus MySQL on AWS.

This is a sneak preview of the labs and talks to be given in April 2016 at the Percona Live Data
Performance Conference
. Attendees received a discount code for $200 off Percona Live registration!

Speakers:

  • Brent Compton, director, Storage Solution Architectures, Red Hat
  • Kyle Bader, senior solutions architect, Red Hat
  • Yves Trudeau, principal consultant, Percona

Join the live event:

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 | 2 p.m. ET | 11 a.m. PT

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Feb
17
2016
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Microsoft Brings Red Hat Enterprise Linux To Azure

MSB10_ServIT_001 Microsoft is now selling Red Hat Enterprise Linux licenses. Starting today, you will be able to deploy Red Hat Linux Enterprise (RHLE) from the Azure Marketplace and get support for your deployments from both Microsoft and Red Hat. In addition, Microsoft today announced that it is now offering certified Bitnami images in the Azure Marketplace and it now supports Walmart‘s (yes —… Read More

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