Sep
19
2018
--

Google’s Cloud Memorystore for Redis is now generally available

After five months in public beta, Google today announced that its Cloud Memorystore for Redis, its fully managed in-memory data store, is now generally available.

The service, which is fully compatible with the Redis protocol, promises to offer sub-millisecond responses for applications that need to use in-memory caching. And because of its compatibility with Redis, developers should be able to easily migrate their applications to this service without making any code changes.

Cloud Memorystore offers two service tiers — a basic one for simple caching and a standard tier for users who need a highly available Redis instance. For the standard tier, Google offers a 99.9 percent availability SLA.

Since it first launched in beta, Google added a few additional capabilities to the service. You can now see your metrics in Stackdriver, for example. Google also added custom IAM roles and improved logging.

As for pricing, Google charges per GB-hour, depending on the service level and capacity you use. You can find the full pricing list here.

Aug
31
2018
--

This Week in Data With Colin Charles 51: Debates Emerging on the Relicensing of OSS

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

There has been a lot of talk around licenses in open source software, and it has hit the database world in the past weeks. Redis Labs relicensed some AGPL software to the Commons Clause (in their case, Apache + Commons Clause; so you can’t really call it Apache any longer). I’ll have more to say on this topic soon, but in the meantime you might enjoy reading Open-source licensing war: Commons Clause. This was the most balanced article I read about this move and the kerfuffle it has caused. We also saw this with Lerna (not database related), and here’s another good read: Open Source Devs Reverse Decision to Block ICE Contractors From Using Software.

Reviewing is under way for Percona Live Europe 2018 talks: the review of the tutorials is complete. We can expect to see a schedule by mid-September, so hang in there—I’ve received a lot of messages asking if talks are going to be approved or not.

Releases

  • While not a new release, MySQL Shell 8.0.12 is worth spending some time with, especially since you might enjoy the pluggable password store.
  • SqlKata for C# – SqlKata is an elegant Sql Query Builder for C#, it helps you to talk with your database engine with a higher order of freedom, it allows you to write complex queries in an Object Oriented Manner, helpful when you need. Works with MySQL, PostgreSQL, and more

Link List

Industry Updates

  • Balazs Pocze is now a database SRE at Wikimedia Foundation. He has spoken at several Percona Live events too!

Upcoming Appearances

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

 

The post This Week in Data With Colin Charles 51: Debates Emerging on the Relicensing of OSS appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
15
2018
--

This Week in Data with Colin Charles 42: Security Focus on Redis and Docker a Timely Reminder to Stay Alert

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

Much of last week, there was a lot of talk around this article: New research shows 75% of ‘open’ Redis servers infected. It turns out, it helps that one should always read beyond the headlines because they tend to be more sensationalist than you would expect. From the author of Redis, I highly recommend reading Clarifications on the Incapsula Redis security report, because it turns out that in this case, it is beyond the headline. The content is also suspect. Antirez had to write this to help the press (we totally need to help keep reportage accurate).

Not to depart from the Redis world just yet, but Antirez also had some collaboration with the Apple Information Security Team with regards to the Redis Lua subsystem. The details are pretty interesting as documented in Redis Lua scripting: several security vulnerabilities fixed because you’ll note that the Alibaba team also found some other issues. Antirez also ensured that the Redis cloud providers (notably: Redis Labs, Amazon, Alibaba, Microsoft, Google, Heroku, Open Redis and Redis Green) got notified first (and in the comments, compose.io was missing, but now added to the list). I do not know if Linux distributions were also informed, but they will probably be rolling out updates soon.

In the “be careful where you get your software” department: some criminals have figured out they could host some crypto-currency mining software that you would get pre-installed if you used their Docker containers. They’ve apparently made over $90,000. It is good to note that the Backdoored images downloaded 5 million times finally removed from Docker Hub. This, however, was up on the Docker Hub for ten months and they managed to get over 5 million downloads across 17 images. Know what images you are pulling. Maybe this is again more reason for software providers to run their own registries?

James Turnbull is out with a new book: Monitoring with Prometheus. It just got released, I’ve grabbed it, but a review will come shortly. He’s managed all this while pulling off what seems to be yet another great O’Reilly Velocity San Jose Conference.

Releases

A quiet week on this front.

Link List

  • INPLACE upgrade from MySQL 5.7 to MySQL 8.0
  • PostgreSQL relevant: What’s is the difference between streaming replication vs hot standby vs warm standby ?
  • A new paper on Amazon Aurora is out: Amazon Aurora: On Avoiding Distributed Consensus for I/Os, Commits, and Membership Changes. It was presented at SIGMOD 2018, and an abstract: “One of the more novel differences between Aurora and other relational databases is how it pushes redo processing to a multi-tenant scale-out storage service, purpose-built for Aurora. Doing so reduces networking traffic, avoids checkpoints and crash recovery, enables failovers to replicas without loss of data, and enables fault-tolerant storage that heals without database involvement. Traditional implementations that leverage distributed storage would use distributed consensus algorithms for commits, reads, replication, and membership changes and amplify cost of underlying storage.” Aurora, as you know, avoids distributed consensus under most circumstances. Short 8-page read.
  • Dormando is blogging again, and this was of particular interest — Caching beyond RAM: the case for NVMe. This is done in the context of memcached, which I am certain many use.
  • It is particularly heartening to note that not only does MongoDB use Linkbench for some of their performance testing, they’re also contributing to making it better via a pull request.

Industry Updates

Trying something new here… To cover fundraising, and people on the move in the database industry.

  • Kenny Gorman — who has been on the program committee for several Percona Live conferences, and spoken at the event multiple times before — is the founder and CEO of Eventador, a stream-processing as a service company built on Apache Kafka and Apache Flink, has just raised $3.8 million in funding to fuel their growth. They are also naturally spending this on hiring. The full press release.
  • Jimmy Guerrero (formerly of MySQL and InfluxDB) is now VP Marketing & Community at YugaByte DB. YugaByte was covered in column 13 as having raised $8 million in November 2017.

Upcoming appearances

  • DataOps Barcelona – Barcelona, Spain – June 21-22, 2018 – code dataopsbcn50 gets you a discount
  • OSCON – Portland, Oregon, USA – July 16-19, 2018
  • Percona webinar on Maria Server 10.3 – June 26, 2018

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

The post This Week in Data with Colin Charles 42: Security Focus on Redis and Docker a Timely Reminder to Stay Alert appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jul
21
2016
--

Redis Labs raises $14M for its in-memory NoSQL database services

data server Redis Labs, the company behind the open source Redis data structure store, today announced that it has raised a $14 million Series C round led by Bain Capital Ventures and Carmel Ventures. The company’s existing investors, including Silicon Valley Bank and Tamar Ventures managing partner Zohar Gilon, also participated in this round. With this round, which follows the company’s… Read More

Aug
26
2015
--

ObjectRocket’s David Murphy talks about MongoDB, Percona Live Amsterdam

Say hello to David Murphy, lead DBA and MongoDB Master at ObjectRocket (a Rackspace company). David works on sharding, tool building, very large-scale issues and high-performance MongoDB architecture. Prior to ObjectRocket he was a MySQL/NoSQL architect at Electronic Arts. David enjoys large-scale operational tool building, high performance OS and database tuning. He is also a core code contributor to MongoDB. He’ll be speaking next month at Percona Live Amsterdam, which runs Sept. 21-13. Enter promo code “BlogInterview” at registration to save €20!


Tom: David, your 3-hour tutorial is titled “Mongo Sharding from the trench: A Veterans field guide.” Did your experience in working with vast amounts of data at Rackspace give you a unique perspective, in view, that now puts you into a position to help people just getting started? Can you give a couple examples?

David: I think this has been something organically I grew into from the days of supporting Cpanel type MySQL instances to today. I have worked for a few verticals from hosts to advertising to gaming, finally entering into the platform service. The others give me a host of knowledge around how customer need systems to work, and then the number and range of workloads we see at Rackspace re-enforces this.

ObjectRocket's David Murphy talks MongoDB & Percona Live Amsterdam

ObjectRocket’s David Murphy

Many times the unique perspective comes with the scale such as someone calling up a single node to the multi-terabyte range. When they go to “shard” they can find the process that is normally very light and unnoticeable to most Mongo sharding can severally lock the metadata for an extended time. In other cases, the “balancer” might not be able to keep up with the amount of working being asked of it.

Toward the smaller end of the spectrum, having seen so many workloads from big to small. I can see similar thought processes and trends. When this happens having worked with some many of these workloads, and honestly having learned along the evolution of mongo helps me explain to clients the good, bad, and the hairy. Many times discussions come down to people not using connection pooling, non-indexed sorting, or complex operators such as $in, $nin, and more. In these cases, I can talk to people about the balance of using these concepts and when they will become bigger issues for them. My goal is to give them the enough knowledge to help determine when it is correct to use development resource to fix and issue, and when it’s manageable and that development could be better spent elsewhere.

 

Tom: The title of your tutorial also sounds like the perfect title of a book. Do you have any for one?

David: What an excellent question! I have thought about this. However, I think the goal of a book if I can find the time to do it. A working title might be “Mongo from the trenches: Surviving the minefield to get ahead”. I think the book might be broken into three sections:  “When should you use or not user Mongo”,  “Schema and Operatorators in the NoSQL world”, “Sharding”. I would do this as this could be a great mini book on its own the community really could use a level of depth similar to the MySQL 5.0 certification guides.  I liked these books as it helped someone understand all the bits of what to consider with your schema design and how it affects the application as much as the database hosts. Then in the second half more administration geared it took those same schema and design choices to help you manage them with confidence.

In the end, Mongo is a good product that works well for most people as it matures we need more and discussion. On topics such as what should you monitor, how you should predict issues, and how valuable are regular audits. Especially in an ecosystem where it’s easy to spin something up, launch it, and move on to the next project.

 

Tom: When and why would you recommend using MongoDB instead of MySQL?

David: I am glad I mentioned this is worthy of a book already, as it is such a complex topic and one that gets me very excited.

I feel there is a bit or misinformation on both sides of this field. Many in the MySQL camp of experts know when someone says they can’t get more than 1000 TPS via MySQL. 9 out of 10 times and design, not a technology issue,  the Mongo crowd love this and due to inherit sharding nature of Mongo they can sidestep these types of issues. Conversely in the Mongo camp you will hear how bad the  SQL standard is, however, omitting transactions for a moment, the same types of operations exist in MySQL and Mongo.  There are some interesting powers in the Mongo aggregation. However, SQL is more powerful and just as complex as some map reduce jobs and aggregations I have written.

As to your question, MySQL will always win in regards to repeatable reads to the database in a transaction. There is some talk of limited transactions in Mongo. However, these will likely not become global and cluster wide anytime soon if ever.  I don’t trust floats in Mongo for financials; it’s not that Mongo doesn’t do them but rather JavaScript type floats are present. Sometimes you need to store data as a 64-bit integer and do math in the app to make it a high precision float. MySQL, on the other hand, has excellent support for precision.

Another area is simply looking at the history of Mongo and MySQL.  Mongo until WiredTiger and  RocksDB were very similar to MyISAM from a locking behavior and support perspective. With the advent of the new storage system, we will-will see major leaps forward in types of flows you will want in Mongo. With the writer lock issue is gone, and locking between the systems is becoming more and more similar making deciding which much harder.

The news is not all use. However, subdocuments and array support in Mongo is amazing there are so many things  I can do in Mongo that even in bitwise SET/ENUM operators I could not do. So if you need that type of system, or you want to create a semi denormalize for of a view in the database. Mongo can do this with ease and on the fly. MySQL, on the other hand, would take careful planning and need whole tables updated.  In this regard I feel more people could use Mongo and is ability to have a versioned document schema allowing more incremental changes to documents. With new code  releases, allowing the application to read old version and “upgrade” them to the latest form. Removing a whole flurry of maintenance related pains that RDBMs have to the frustration of developers who just want to launch the new product.

The last thing I would want to say here is you need not choose, why not use both. Mongo can be very powerful for keeping a semi denormalized version of the data that is nimble to allow fast application or system updates and features. Leaving MySQL for a very specific workload that need the precision are simple are not expected to have schema changes.  I am a huge fan of keeping the transactional portions in MySQL, and the rest in Mongo. Allowing you to scale quickly up and down the build of your data needs, and more slowly change the parts that need to be 100% consistent all of the time with no room for eventual consistency.

 

Tom: What another session(s) are you most looking forward to besides your own at Percona Live Amsterdam?

David: There are a few that are near and dear to me.

Turtles all the way down: tuning Linux for database workloads” looks like a great one. It is one view I have always had, and DBA’s should be DBA’s,  SysAdmins, and Storage people rolled into one. That way they can understand the impacts of the application down to the blocks the database reads.

TokuDB internals” is another one. I have used TokuDB in MySQL and Mongo to some degree but as it has never had in-depth documentation. A topic like that is a great way to fill any gaps for experienced and new people alike.

Database Reliability Engineering” looks like a great talk from a great speaker.

As an InnoDB geek, I like the idea around “Understanding InnoDB locks: case studies.”

I see a huge amount of potential for MaxScale if anyone else is curious, “Anatomy of a Proxy Server: MaxScale Internals” should be good for R/W splits and split writing type cases.

Finally, one of my favorite people is Charity as she always is so energetic and can get to the heart of the matter. If you are not going to “Upgrade your database: without losing your data, your perf or your mind” you are missing out!

 

Tom: Thanks for speaking with me, David! Is there anything else you’d like to add: either about Rackspace or Percona Live Amsterdam?

David: In regards to Rackspace, I urge everyone to check out the Data Services group.  We handle everything from Redis to Hadoop with a goal of augmenting your groups or providing experts to help keep your uptime as high as possible. With options for dedicated hosts to platform type services, there is something that helps everyone. Rackspace is not just a cloud company but a real support company that provides amazing hardware to use, or support for other hardware location that is growing rapidly.

With Percona Amsterdam, everyone should come the group of speakers is simply amazing, I for one am excited by so many topics because they are all so compelling. Outside of that you will it hard find another a gathering of database experts with multiple technologies under their belt and who truly believe in the move to picking the right technology for the right use case.

The post ObjectRocket’s David Murphy talks about MongoDB, Percona Live Amsterdam appeared first on Percona Data Performance Blog.

Jan
27
2015
--

Percona University: Back to school Feb. 12 in Raleigh, N.C.

Percona CEO Peter Zaitsev leads a track at the inaugural Percona University event in Raleigh, N.C. on Jan. 29, 2013.

Percona CEO Peter Zaitsev leads a track at the inaugural Percona University event in Raleigh, N.C. on Jan. 29, 2013.

About two years ago we held our first-ever Percona University event in Raleigh, N.C. It was a great success with high attendance and very positive feedback which led us to organize a number of similar educational events in different locations around the world.

And next month we’ll be back where it all started. On February 12, Percona University comes to Raleigh – and this time the full-day educational event will be much more cool. What have we changed? Take a look at the agenda.

First – this is no longer just a MySQL-focused event. While 10 years ago MySQL was the default, dominating choice for modern companies looking to store and process data effectively – this is no longer the case. And as such the event’s theme is “Smart Data.” In addition to MySQL, Percona and MariaDB technologies (which you would expect to be covered), we have talks about Hadoop, MongoDB, Cassandra, Redis, Kafka, SQLLite.

However the “core” data-store technologies is not the only thing successful data architects should know – one should also be well-versed in the modern approaches to the infrastructure and general data management. This is why we also have talks about Ansible and OpenStack, DBaaS and PaaS as well as a number of more talks about big-picture topics around architecture and technology management.

Second – this is our first multi-track Percona University event – we had so many great speakers interested in speaking that we could not fit them all into one track, so we have two tracks now with 25 sessions which makes that quite an educational experience!

Third – while we’re committed to having those events be very affordable, we decided to charge $10 per attendee. The reason for this is to encourage people to register who actually plan on attending – when hosting free events we found out that way too many registered and never showed up, which was causing the venues to rapidly fill past capacity and forcing us to turn away those who could actually be there. It was also causing us to order more food than needed, causing waste. We trust $10 will not prevent you from attending, but if it does cause hardship, just drop me a note and I’ll give you a free pass.

A few other things you need to know:

This is very much a technically focused event. I have encouraged all speakers to make it about technology rather than sales pitches or marketing presentations.

This is low-key educational event. Do not expect it to be very fancy. If you’re looking for the great conference experience consider attending the Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo this April.

Although it’s a full-day event, you can come for just part of the day. We recognize many of you will not be able to take a full day from work and may be able to attend only in the morning or the afternoon. This is totally fine. The morning registration hours is when most people will register, however, there will be someone on the desk to get you your pass throughout the day.

Thinking of Attending? Take a look at the day’s sessions and then register as space is limited. The event will be held at North Carolina State University’s McKimmon Conference & Training Center. I hope to see you there!

The post Percona University: Back to school Feb. 12 in Raleigh, N.C. appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Jun
19
2013
--

What technologies are you running alongside MySQL?

What technologies are you running alongside MySQL?In many environments MySQL is not the only technology used to store in-process data.

Quite frequently, especially with large-scale or complicated applications, we use MySQL alongside other technologies for certain tasks of reporting, caching as well as main data-store for portions of application.

What technologies for data storage and processing do you use alongside MySQL in your environment? Please feel free to elaborate in the comments about your use case and experiences!

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

The post What technologies are you running alongside MySQL? appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Powered by WordPress | Theme: Aeros 2.0 by TheBuckmaker.com