(More) Secure local passwords in MySQL 5.6 and up

I log into a lot of different servers running MySQL and one of the first things I do is create a file in my home directory called ‘.my.cnf’ with my credentials to that local mysql instance:


This means I don’t have to type my password in every time, nor am I tempted to include it on the command line with -p and get the dreaded (but completely accurate):

Warning: Using a password on the command line interface can be insecure.

MySQL 5.6 introduces a utility to make this easier and more secure. First, let’s start with a new mysqld instance with a blank root password and make it more secure:

[vagrant@localhost ~]$ mysqladmin -u root password
New password:secret
Confirm new password:secret
[vagrant@localhost ~]$ mysql -u root
ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: NO)

Ok, so I’ve added a password, now I want to create my .my.cnf file:

[vagrant@localhost ~]$ mysql_config_editor set --user=root --password
Enter password:secret
[vagrant@localhost ~]$ mysql
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or g.
Your MySQL connection id is 10
Server version: 5.6.21-70.0 Percona Server (GPL), Release 70.0, Revision 688
Copyright (c) 2009-2014 Percona LLC and/or its affiliates
Copyright (c) 2000, 2014, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
Type 'help;' or 'h' for help. Type 'c' to clear the current input statement.

What did ‘mysql_config_editor set’ actually do? It creates a .mylogin.cnf file (which stands in for a .my.cnf) in my home directory that contains my credentials, just in encrypted form:

[vagrant@localhost ~]$ ls -alh .my*
-rw-------. 1 vagrant vagrant 100 Nov 19 16:20 .mylogin.cnf
-rw-------. 1 vagrant vagrant  29 Nov 19 16:20 .mysql_history
[vagrant@localhost ~]$ cat .mylogin.cnf
??>NTv?&?S???/?,	>?$%KZ 9i?V?jK?H[???
[vagrant@localhost ~]$ mysql_config_editor print
user = root
password = *****

The mysql client picks this up right away and will use it by default. This file has good default filesystem permissions, is local to my homedir, and is a whole lot better than specifying it on the command line or typing it in every time.

This utility also supports a feature called ‘login-path’ wherein you can add multiple mysql logins (perhaps to different servers) and refer to them with the —login-path option in the mysql client:

[vagrant@localhost ~]$ mysql_config_editor set --login-path=remote --host=remote --user=remote --password
Enter password:secure
[vagrant@localhost ~]$ mysql_config_editor print --all
user = root
password = *****
user = remote
password = *****
host = remote
[vagrant@localhost ~]$ mysql --login-path=remote
ERROR 2005 (HY000): Unknown MySQL server host 'remote' (0)

The ‘remote’ host doesn’t exist here, but you get the idea. You can create as many login-paths as you want with varied hostnames, credentials and other login parameters and quickly access them with any client supporting login-path.

Now, how secure is this really?  This isn’t secure from anyone who roots your DB server.  I would say the benefits are more about reducing careless password storage and tidier management of local credentials.

The post (More) Secure local passwords in MySQL 5.6 and up appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

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