Dec
17
2018
--

Amazon RDS Aurora Serverless – The Basics

amazon aurora serverless

amazon aurora serverlessWhen I attended AWS Re:Invent 2018, I saw there was a lot of attention from both customers and the AWS team on Amazon RDS Aurora Serverless. So I decided to take a deeper look at this technology, and write a series of blog posts on this topic.

In this first post of the series, you will learn about Amazon Aurora Serverless basics and use cases. In later posts, I will share benchmark results and in depth realization results.

What Amazon Aurora Serverless Is

A great source of information on this topic is How Amazon Aurora Serverless Works from the official AWS  documentation. In this article, you learn what Serverless deployment rather than provisional deployment means. Instead of specifying an instance size you specify the minimum and maximum number of “Aurora Capacity Units” you would like to have:

choose MySQL version on Aurora

Amazon Aurora setup

capacity settings on Amazon Aurora

Once you set up such an instance it will automatically scale between its minimum and maximum capacity points. You also will be able to scale it manually if you like.

One of the most interesting Aurora Serverless properties in my opinion is its ability to go into pause if it stays idle for specified period of time.

pause capacity on Amazon Aurora

This feature can save a lot of money for test/dev environment where load can be intermittent.  Be careful, though, using this for production size databases as waking up is far from instant. I’ve seen cases of it taking over 30 seconds in my experiments.

Another thing which may surprise you about Amazon Aurora Serverless, at the time of this writing, is that it is not very well coordinated with other Amazon RDS Aurora products –  it is only available as a MySQL 5.6 based edition and is not compatible with recent parallel query innovations either as it comes with list of other significant limitations. I’m sure Amazon will resolve these in due course, but for now you need to be aware of them.

A simple way to think about it is as follows: Amazon Aurora Serverless is a way to deploy Amazon Aurora so it scales automatically with load; can automatically pause when there is no load; and resume automatically when requests come in.

What Amazon Aurora Serverless is not

When I think about Serverless Computing I think about about elastic scalability across multiple servers and resource usage based pricing.   DynamoDB, another Database which is advertised as Serverless by Amazon, fits those criteria while Amazon Aurora Serverless does not.

With Amazon Aurora Serverless, for better or for worse, you’re still living in the “classical” instance word.  Aurora Capacity Units (ACUs) are pretty much CPU and Memory Capacity. You still need to understand how many database connections you are allowed to have. You still need to monitor your CPU usage on the instance to understand when auto scaling will happen.

Amazon Aurora Serverless also does not have any magic to scale you beyond single instance performance, which you can get with provisioned Amazon Aurora

Summary

I’m excited about the new possibilities Amazon Aurora Serveless offers.  As long as you do not expect magic and understand this is one of the newest products in the Amazon Aurora family, you surely should give it a try for applications which fit.

If you’re hungry for more information about Amazon Aurora Serverless and can’t wait for the next articles in this series, this article by Jeremy Daly contains a lot of great information.


Photo by Emily Hon on Unsplash

Dec
13
2018
--

They scaled YouTube — now they’ll shard everyone with PlanetScale

When the former CTOs of YouTube, Facebook and Dropbox seed fund a database startup, you know there’s something special going on under the hood. Jiten Vaidya and Sugu Sougoumarane saved YouTube from a scalability nightmare by inventing and open-sourcing Vitess, a brilliant relational data storage system. But in the decade since working there, the pair have been inundated with requests from tech companies desperate for help building the operational scaffolding needed to actually integrate Vitess.

So today the pair are revealing their new startup PlanetScale that makes it easy to build multi-cloud databases that handle enormous amounts of information without locking customers into Amazon, Google or Microsoft’s infrastructure. Battle-tested at YouTube, the technology could allow startups to fret less about their backend and focus more on their unique value proposition. “Now they don’t have to reinvent the wheel” Vaidya tells me. “A lot of companies facing this scaling problem end up solving it badly in-house and now there’s a way to solve that problem by using us to help.”

PlanetScale quietly raised a $3 million seed round in April, led by SignalFire and joined by a who’s who of engineering luminaries. They include YouTube co-founder and CTO Steve Chen, Quora CEO and former Facebook CTO Adam D’Angelo, former Dropbox CTO Aditya Agarwal, PayPal and Affirm co-founder Max Levchin, MuleSoft co-founder and CTO Ross Mason, Google director of engineering Parisa Tabriz and Facebook’s first female engineer and South Park Commons founder Ruchi Sanghvi. If anyone could foresee the need for Vitess implementation services, it’s these leaders, who’ve dealt with scaling headaches at tech’s top companies.

But how can a scrappy startup challenge the tech juggernauts for cloud supremacy? First, by actually working with them. The PlanetScale beta that’s now launching lets companies spin up Vitess clusters on its database-as-a-service, their own through a licensing deal, or on AWS with Google Cloud and Microsoft Azure coming shortly. Once these integrations with the tech giants are established, PlanetScale clients can use it as an interface for a multi-cloud setup where they could keep their data master copies on AWS US-West with replicas on Google Cloud in Ireland and elsewhere. That protects companies from becoming dependent on one provider and then getting stuck with price hikes or service problems.

PlanetScale also promises to uphold the principles that undergirded Vitess. “It’s our value that we will keep everything in the query pack completely open source so none of our customers ever have to worry about lock-in” Vaidya says.

PlanetScale co-founders (from left): Jiten Vaidya and Sugu Sougoumarane

Battle-tested, YouTube-approved

He and Sougoumarane met 25 years ago while at Indian Institute of Technology Bombay. Back in 1993 they worked at pioneering database company Informix together before it flamed out. Sougoumarane was eventually hired by Elon Musk as an early engineer for X.com before it got acquired by PayPal, and then left for YouTube. Vaidya was working at Google and the pair were reunited when it bought YouTube and Sougoumarane pulled him on to the team.

“YouTube was growing really quickly and the relationship database they were using with MySQL was sort of falling apart at the seams,” Vaidya recalls. Adding more CPU and memory to the database infra wasn’t cutting it, so the team created Vitess. The horizontal scaling sharding middleware for MySQL let users segment their database to reduce memory usage while still being able to rapidly run operations. YouTube has smoothly ridden that infrastructure to 1.8 billion users ever since.

“Sugu and Mike Solomon invented and made Vitess open source right from the beginning since 2010 because they knew the scaling problem wasn’t just for YouTube, and they’ll be at other companies five or 10 years later trying to solve the same problem,” Vaidya explains. That proved true, and now top apps like Square and HubSpot run entirely on Vitess, with Slack now 30 percent onboard.

Vaidya left YouTube in 2012 and became the lead engineer at Endorse, which got acquired by Dropbox, where he worked for four years. But in the meantime, the engineering community strayed toward MongoDB-style non-relational databases, which Vaidya considers inferior. He sees indexing issues and says that if the system hiccups during an operation, data can become inconsistent — a big problem for banking and commerce apps. “We think horizontally scaled relationship databases are more elegant and are something enterprises really need.

Database legends reunite

Fed up with the engineering heresy, a year ago Vaidya committed to creating PlanetScale. It’s composed of four core offerings: professional training in Vitess, on-demand support for open-source Vitess users, Vitess database-as-a-service on PlanetScale’s servers and software licensing for clients that want to run Vitess on premises or through other cloud providers. It lets companies re-shard their databases on the fly to relocate user data to comply with regulations like GDPR, safely migrate from other systems without major codebase changes, make on-demand changes and run on Kubernetes.

The PlanetScale team

PlanetScale’s customers now include Indonesian e-commerce giant Bukalapak, and it’s helping Booking.com, GitHub and New Relic migrate to open-source Vitess. Growth is suddenly ramping up due to inbound inquiries. Last month around when Square Cash became the No. 1 app, its engineering team published a blog post extolling the virtues of Vitess. Now everyone’s seeking help with Vitess sharding, and PlanetScale is waiting with open arms. “Jiten and Sugu are legends and know firsthand what companies require to be successful in this booming data landscape,” says Ilya Kirnos, founding partner and CTO of SignalFire.

The big cloud providers are trying to adapt to the relational database trend, with Google’s Cloud Spanner and Cloud SQL, and Amazon’s AWS SQL and AWS Aurora. Their huge networks and marketing war chests could pose a threat. But Vaidya insists that while it might be easy to get data into these systems, it can be a pain to get it out. PlanetScale is designed to give them freedom of optionality through its multi-cloud functionality so their eggs aren’t all in one basket.

Finding product market fit is tough enough. Trying to suddenly scale a popular app while also dealing with all the other challenges of growing a company can drive founders crazy. But if it’s good enough for YouTube, startups can trust PlanetScale to make databases one less thing they have to worry about.

Dec
12
2018
--

AWS Elastic Block Storage (EBS) – Can We Get It Truly Elastic?

very old disk storage

very old disk storageAt AWS Re:Invent 2018 there were many great announcements of AWS New Services and New Features, but one basic feature that I’ve been waiting for years to be released is still nowhere to be  found.

AWS Elastic Block Storage (EBS) is great and it’s got better through the years, adding different storage types and features like Provisioned IOPS. However, it still has the most basic inconvenient requirement – I have to decide in advance how much space I need to allocate, and pay for all of that allocated space whether I use it or not.

It would be so much better if AWS would allow true consumption model pricing with EBS, where you pay for the storage used, not the storage allocated. This is already the case for S3,  RDS, and even EC2 instances (with Unlimited Option on T2/T3 Instances), not to mention Serverless focused services.

For example, I would love to be able to create a 1TB EBS volume but only pay for 10GB of storage if I only use this amount of space.

Modern storage subsystems do a good job differentiating between the space available on the block device and what’s being used by user files and filesystem metadata. The space that’s not allocated any more can be TRIMmed. This is a basic requirement for working well on flash storage, and as modern EC2 instances already provision EBS storage as emulated NVMe devices, I would imagine Amazon could hook into such functionality to track space actually used.

For us at Percona this would make shipping applications on AWS Marketplace much more convenient. Right now for Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM)  we have to choose how much space to allocate to the EBS volume by default, picking between it being expensive to run because of paying for the large unused EBS volume or setting a very limited by default capacity that needs user action to resize the EBS volume. Consumption-based EBS pricing would solve this dilemma.

This problem seems to be well recognized and understood. For example Pure Storage Cloud Block Storage (currently in Beta) is  expected to have such a feature.

I hope with its insane customer focus AWS will add this feature in the future, but currently we have to get by without it.


Image: Arnold Reinhold [CC BY-SA 2.5], via Wikimedia Commons

Dec
11
2018
--

Upcoming Webinar Wed 12/12: MySQL 8 for Developers

MySQL 8 for Developers

MySQL 8 for DevelopersPlease join Percona’s CEO Peter Zaitsev as he presents MySQL 8 for Developers on Wednesday, December 12th, 2018 at 11:00 AM PST (UTC-7) / 2:00 PM EST (UTC-5).

Register Now

There are many great new features in MySQL 8, but how exactly can they help your application? This session takes a practical look at MySQL 8 features. It also details which limitations of previous MySQL versions are overcome by MySQL 8. Lastly, what you can do with MySQL 8 that you could not have done before is discussed.

Register for MySQL 8 for Developers to learn how MySQL’s new features can help your application and more.

Dec
10
2018
--

Percona XtraBackup 8.0.4 Is Now Available

Percona XtraBackup 8.0

Percona XtraBackup 8.0Percona is glad to announce the release of Percona XtraBackup 8.0.4 on December 10, 2018. You can download it from our download site and apt and yum repositories.

Percona XtraBackup enables MySQL backups without blocking user queries, making it ideal for companies with large data sets and mission-critical applications that cannot tolerate long periods of downtime. Offered free as an open source solution, it drives down backup costs while providing unique features for MySQL backups.

This release of Percona Xtrabackup is a General Availability release ready for use in a production environment.

Please note the following about this release:

  • The deprecated innobackupex has been removed. Use the xtrabackup command to back up your instances: $ xtrabackup --backup --target-dir=/data/backup
  • When migrating from earlier database server versions, backup and restore and using XtraBackup 2.4 and then use mysql_upgrade from MySQL 8.0.x
  • If using yum or apt repositories to install Percona Xtrabackup 8.0.4, ensure that you have enabled the new tools repository. You can do this with the percona-release enable tools release command and then install the percona-xtrabackup-80 package.

All Percona software is open-source and free. We are grateful to the community for the invaluable contributions to Percona XtraBackup. We would especially like to highlight the input of Alexey Kopytov who has been actively offering improvements and submitting bug reports for Percona XtraBackup.

New Features

  • Percona XtraBackup 8.0.4 is based on MySQL 8.0.13 and fully supports Percona Server for MySQL 8.0 series and MySQL 8.0 series.

Bugs Fixed

  • PXB-1699:xtrabackup --prepare could fail on backups of MySQL 8.0.13 databases
  • PXB-1704:xtrabackup --prepare could hang while performing insert buffer merge
  • PXB-1668: When the --throttle option was used, the applied value was different from the one specified by the user (off by one error)
  • PXB-1679: PXB could crash when ALTER TABLE … TRUNCATE PARTITION command was run during a backup without locking DDL
Dec
07
2018
--

MySQL 8 and The FRM Drop… How To Recover Table DDL

MySQL 8 frm drop recover ddl

… or what I should keep in mind in case of disaster

MySQL 8 frm drop recover ddl

To retrieve and maintain in SQL format the definition of all tables in a database, is a best practice that we all should adopt. To have that under version control is also another best practice to keep in mind.

While doing that may seem redundant, it can become a life saver in several situations. From the need to review what has historically changed in a table, to knowing who changed what and why… to when you need to recover your data and have your beloved MySQL instance not start…

But let’s be honest, only a few do the right thing, and even fewer keep that information up to date. Given that’s the case, what can we do when we have the need to discover/recover the table structure?

From the beginning, MySQL has used some external files to describe its internal structure.

For instance, if I have a schema named windmills and a table named wmillAUTOINC1, on the file system I will see this:

-rw-r-----. 1 mysql mysql     8838 Mar 14 2018 wmillAUTOINC1.frm
-rw-r-----. 1 mysql mysql   131072 Mar 14 2018 wmillAUTOINC1.ibd

The ibd file contains the data, while the frm file contains the structure information.

Putting aside ANY discussion about if this is safe, if it’s transactional and more… when we’ve experienced some major crash and data corruption this approach has been helpful. Being able to read from the frm file was the easiest way to get the information we need.
Simple tools like DBSake made the task quite trivial, and allowed us to script table definition when needed to run long, complex tedious data recovery:

[root@master1 windmills]# /opt/tools/dbsake frmdump wmillAUTOINC1.frm
--
-- Table structure for table `wmillAUTOINC1`
-- Created with MySQL Version 5.7.20
--
CREATE TABLE `wmillAUTOINC1` (
  `id` bigint(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `uuid` char(36) COLLATE utf8_bin NOT NULL,
  `millid` smallint(6) NOT NULL,
  `kwatts_s` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `date` date NOT NULL,
  `location` varchar(50) COLLATE utf8_bin NOT NULL,
  `active` tinyint(2) NOT NULL DEFAULT '1',
  `time` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  `strrecordtype` char(3) COLLATE utf8_bin NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `IDX_millid` (`millid`,`active`),
  KEY `IDX_active` (`id`,`active`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_bin ROW_FORMAT=DYNAMIC;

Of course, if the frm file was also corrupt, then we could try to get the information from the ibdata dictionary. If that is corrupted too (trust me I’ve seen all of these situations) … well a last resource was hoping the customer has a recent table definition stored somewhere, but as mentioned before, we are not so diligent, are we?

Now, though, in MySQL8 we do not have FRM files, they were dropped. Even more interesting is that we do not have the same dictionary, most of the things that we knew have changed, including the dictionary location. So what can be done?

Well Oracle have moved the FRM information—and more—to what is called Serialized Dictionary Information (SDI), the SDI is written INSIDE the ibd file, and represents the redundant copy of the information contained in the data dictionary.

The SDI is updated/modified by DDL operations on tables that reside in that tablespace. This is it: if you have one file per table normally, then you will have in that file ONLY the SDI for that table, but if you have multiple tables in a tablespace, the SDI information will refer to ALL of the tables.

To extract this information from the IBD files, Oracle provides a utility called ibd2sdi. This application parses the SDI information and reports a JSON file that can be easily manipulated to extract and build the table definition.

One exception is represented by Partitioned tables. The SDI information is contained ONLY in the first partition, and if you drop it, it is moved to the next one. I will show that later.

But let’s see how it works. In the next examples I will look for the table’s name, attributes, and datatype starting from the dictionary tables.

To obtain the info I will do this:

/opt/mysql_templates/mysql-8P/bin/./ibd2sdi   /opt/mysql_instances/master8/data/mysql.ibd |jq  '.[]?|.[]?|.dd_object?|("------------------------------------"?,"TABLE NAME = ",.name?,"****",(.columns?|.[]?|(.name?,.column_type_utf8?)))'

The result will be something like:

"------------------------------------"
"TABLE NAME = "
"tables"
"****"
"id"
"bigint(20) unsigned"
"schema_id"
"bigint(20) unsigned"
"name"
"varchar(64)"
"type"
"enum('BASE TABLE','VIEW','SYSTEM VIEW')"
"engine"
"varchar(64)"
"mysql_version_id"
"int(10) unsigned"
"row_format"
"enum('Fixed','Dynamic','Compressed','Redundant','Compact','Paged')"
"collation_id"
"bigint(20) unsigned"
"comment"
"varchar(2048)"
<snip>
"------------------------------------"
"TABLE NAME = "
"tablespaces"
"****"
"id"
"bigint(20) unsigned"
"name"
"varchar(259)"
"options"
"mediumtext"
"se_private_data"
"mediumtext"
"comment"
"varchar(2048)"
"engine"
"varchar(64)"
"DB_TRX_ID"
""
"DB_ROLL_PTR"
""

I cut the output for brevity, but if you run the above command yourself you’ll be able to see that this retrieves the information for ALL the tables residing in the IBD.

The other thing I hope you noticed is that I am NOT parsing ibdata, but mysql.ibd. Why? Because the dictionary was moved out from ibdata and is now in mysql.ibd.

Look what happens if I try to parse ibdata:

[root@master1 ~]# /opt/mysql_templates/mysql-8P/bin/./ibd2sdi   /opt/mysql_instances/master8/data/ibdata1 |jq '.'
[INFO] ibd2sdi: SDI is empty.

Be very careful here to not mess up your mysql.ibd file.

Now what can I do to get information about my wmillAUTOINC1 table in MySQL8?

That is quite simple:

/opt/mysql_templates/mysql-8P/bin/./ibd2sdi   /opt/mysql_instances/master8/data/windmills/wmillAUTOINC.ibd |jq '.'
[
  "ibd2sdi",
  {
    "type": 1,
    "id": 1068,
    "object": {
      "mysqld_version_id": 80013,
      "dd_version": 80013,
      "sdi_version": 1,
      "dd_object_type": "Table",
      "dd_object": {
        "name": "wmillAUTOINC",
        "mysql_version_id": 80011,
        "created": 20180925095853,
        "last_altered": 20180925095853,
        "hidden": 1,
        "options": "avg_row_length=0;key_block_size=0;keys_disabled=0;pack_record=1;row_type=2;stats_auto_recalc=0;stats_sample_pages=0;",
        "columns": [
          {
            "name": "id",
            "type": 9,
            "is_nullable": false,
            "is_zerofill": false,
            "is_unsigned": false,
            "is_auto_increment": true,
            "is_virtual": false,
            "hidden": 1,
            "ordinal_position": 1,
            "char_length": 11,
            "numeric_precision": 19,
            "numeric_scale": 0,
            "numeric_scale_null": false,
            "datetime_precision": 0,
            "datetime_precision_null": 1,
            "has_no_default": false,
            "default_value_null": false,
            "srs_id_null": true,
            "srs_id": 0,
            "default_value": "AAAAAAAAAAA=",
            "default_value_utf8_null": true,
            "default_value_utf8": "",
            "default_option": "",
            "update_option": "",
            "comment": "",
            "generation_expression": "",
            "generation_expression_utf8": "",
            "options": "interval_count=0;",
            "se_private_data": "table_id=1838;",
            "column_key": 2,
            "column_type_utf8": "bigint(11)",
            "elements": [],
            "collation_id": 83,
            "is_explicit_collation": false
          },
<SNIP>
        "indexes": [
          {
            "name": "PRIMARY",
            "hidden": false,
            "is_generated": false,
            "ordinal_position": 1,
            "comment": "",
            "options": "flags=0;",
            "se_private_data": "id=2261;root=4;space_id=775;table_id=1838;trx_id=6585972;",
            "type": 1,
            "algorithm": 2,
            "is_algorithm_explicit": false,
            "is_visible": true,
            "engine": "InnoDB",
<Snip>
        ],
        "foreign_keys": [],
        "partitions": [],
        "collation_id": 83
      }
    }
  },
  {
    "type": 2,
    "id": 780,
    "object": {
      "mysqld_version_id": 80011,
      "dd_version": 80011,
      "sdi_version": 1,
      "dd_object_type": "Tablespace",
      "dd_object": {
        "name": "windmills/wmillAUTOINC",
        "comment": "",
        "options": "",
        "se_private_data": "flags=16417;id=775;server_version=80011;space_version=1;",
        "engine": "InnoDB",
        "files": [
          {
            "ordinal_position": 1,
            "filename": "./windmills/wmillAUTOINC.ibd",
            "se_private_data": "id=775;"
          }
        ]
      }
    }
  }
]

The JSON will contains:

  • A section describing the DB object at high level
  • Array of columns and related information
  • Array of indexes
  • Partition information (not here but in the next example)
  • Table space information

That is a lot more detail compared to what we had in the FRM, and it is quite relevant and interesting information as well.

Once you have extracted the SDI, any JSON parser tool script can generate the information for the SQL DDL.

I mention partitions, so let’s look at this a bit more, given they can be tricky.

As mentioned, the SDI information is present ONLY in the first partition. All other partitions hold ONLY the tablespace information. Given that, then the first thing to do is to identify which partition is the first… OR simply try to access all partitions, and when you are able to get the details, extract them.

The process is the same:

[root@master1 ~]# /opt/mysql_templates/mysql-8P/bin/./ibd2sdi   /opt/mysql_instances/master8/data/windmills/wmillAUTOINCPART#P#PT20170301.ibd |jq '.'
[
  "ibd2sdi",
  {
    "type": 1,
    "id": 1460,
    "object": {
      "mysqld_version_id": 80013,
      "dd_version": 80013,
      "sdi_version": 1,
      "dd_object_type": "Table",
      "dd_object": {
        "name": "wmillAUTOINCPART",
        "mysql_version_id": 80013,
        "created": 20181125110300,
        "last_altered": 20181125110300,
        "hidden": 1,
        "options": "avg_row_length=0;key_block_size=0;keys_disabled=0;pack_record=1;row_type=2;stats_auto_recalc=0;stats_sample_pages=0;",
        "columns": [<snip>
    	  "schema_ref": "windmills",
        "se_private_id": 18446744073709552000,
        "engine": "InnoDB",
        "last_checked_for_upgrade_version_id": 80013,
        "comment": "",
        "se_private_data": "autoinc=31080;version=2;",
        "row_format": 2,
        "partition_type": 7,
        "partition_expression": "to_days(`date`)",
        "partition_expression_utf8": "to_days(`date`)",
        "default_partitioning": 1,
        "subpartition_type": 0,
        "subpartition_expression": "",
        "subpartition_expression_utf8": "",
        "default_subpartitioning": 0,
       ],
<snip>
        "foreign_keys": [],
        "partitions": [
          {
            "name": "PT20170301",
            "parent_partition_id": 18446744073709552000,
            "number": 0,
            "se_private_id": 1847,
            "description_utf8": "736754",
            "engine": "InnoDB",
            "comment": "",
            "options": "",
            "se_private_data": "autoinc=0;version=0;",
            "values": [
              {
                "max_value": false,
                "null_value": false,
                "list_num": 0,
                "column_num": 0,
                "value_utf8": "736754"
              }
            ],

The difference, as you can see, is that the section related to partitions and sub partitions will be filled with all the details you might need to recreate the partitions.

We will have:

  • Partition type
  • Partition expression
  • Partition values
  • …more

Same for sub partitions.

Now again see what happens if I parse the second partition:

[root@master1 ~]# /opt/mysql_templates/mysql-8P/bin/./ibd2sdi   /opt/mysql_instances/master8/data/windmills/wmillAUTOINCPART#P#PT20170401.ibd |jq '.'
[
  "ibd2sdi",
  {
    "type": 2,
    "id": 790,
    "object": {
      "mysqld_version_id": 80011,
      "dd_version": 80011,
      "sdi_version": 1,
      "dd_object_type": "Tablespace",
      "dd_object": {
        "name": "windmills/wmillAUTOINCPART#P#PT20170401",
        "comment": "",
        "options": "",
        "se_private_data": "flags=16417;id=785;server_version=80011;space_version=1;",
        "engine": "InnoDB",
        "files": [
          {
            "ordinal_position": 1,
            "filename": "./windmills/wmillAUTOINCPART#P#PT20170401.ibd",
            "se_private_data": "id=785;"
          }
        ]
      }
    }
  }
]

I will get only the information about the tablespace, not the table.

As promised let me show you now what happens if I delete the first partition, and the second partition becomes the first:

(root@localhost) [windmills]>alter table wmillAUTOINCPART drop partition PT20170301;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (1.84 sec)
Records: 0  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0
[root@master1 ~]# /opt/mysql_templates/mysql-8P/bin/./ibd2sdi   /opt/mysql_instances/master8/data/windmills/wmillAUTOINCPART#P#PT20170401.ibd |jq '.'|more
[
  "ibd2sdi",
  {
    "type": 1,
    "id": 1461,
    "object": {
      "mysqld_version_id": 80013,
      "dd_version": 80013,
      "sdi_version": 1,
      "dd_object_type": "Table",
      "dd_object": {
        "name": "wmillAUTOINCPART",
        "mysql_version_id": 80013,
        "created": 20181129130834,
        "last_altered": 20181129130834,
        "hidden": 1,
        "options": "avg_row_length=0;key_block_size=0;keys_disabled=0;pack_record=1;row_type=2;stats_auto_recalc=0;stats_sample_pages=0;",
        "columns": [
          {
            "name": "id",
            "type": 9,
            "is_nullable": false,
            "is_zerofill": false,
            "is_unsigned": false,
            "is_auto_increment": true,
            "is_virtual": false,
            "hidden": 1,
            "ordinal_position": 1,

As I mentioned before, each DDL updates the SDI, and here we go: I will have all the information on what’s NOW the FIRST partition. Please note the value of the attribute “created” between the first time I queried the other partition, and the one that I have now:

/opt/mysql_instances/master8/data/windmills/wmillAUTOINCPART#P#PT20170301.ibd
       "created": 20181125110300,
/opt/mysql_instances/master8/data/windmills/wmillAUTOINCPART#P#PT20170401.ibd
       "created": 20181129130834,

To be clear the second created is NOW (PT20170401) from when I dropped the other partition (PT20170301).

Conclusions

In the end, this solution is definitely more powerful than the FRM files. It will allow us to parse the file and identify the table definition more easily, providing us with much more detail and information.

The problems will arise if and when the IBD file becomes corrupt.

As for the manual:  For InnoDB, an SDI record requires a single index page, which is 16KB in size by default. However, SDI data is compressed to reduce the storage footprint.

By which it means that for each table I have a page, if I associate record=table. Which means that in case of IBD corruption I should (likely) be able to read those pages. Unless I have bad (very bad) luck.

I still wonder how the dimension of an IBD affects the SDI retrieval, but given I have not tried it yet I will have to let you know.

As an aside, I am working on a script to facilitate the generation of the SQL, it’s not yet ready but you can find it here

Last note but keep this in mind! It is stated in the manual but in a hidden place and in small letters:
DDL operations take longer due to writing to storage, undo logs, and redo logs instead of .frm files.

References

https://stedolan.github.io/jq/

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/ibd2sdi.html

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/serialized-dictionary-information.html

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/8.0/en/data-dictionary-limitations.html


Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash

Dec
05
2018
--

Nondeterministic Functions in MySQL (i.e. rand) Can Surprise You

MySQL non deterministic functions rand

Working on a test case with sysbench, I encountered this:

mysql> select * from sbtest1 where id = round(rand()*10000, 0);
+------+--------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+-------------------------------------------------------------+
| id   | k      | c                                                                                                                       | pad                                                         |
+------+--------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+-------------------------------------------------------------+
|  179 | 499871 | 09833083632-34593445843-98203182724-77632394229-31240034691-22855093589-98577647071-95962909368-34814236148-76937610370 | 62233363025-41327474153-95482195752-11204169522-13131828192 |
| 1606 | 502031 | 81212399253-12831141664-41940957498-63947990218-16408477860-15124776228-42269003436-07293216458-45216889819-75452278174 | 25423822623-32136209218-60113604068-17409951653-00581045257 |
+------+--------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+-------------------------------------------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.30 sec)

I was really surprised. First, and the most important, id is a primary key and the rand() function should produce just one value. How come it returns two rows? Second, why is the response time 0.30 sec? That seems really high for a primary key access.

Looking further:

CREATE TABLE `sbtest1` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `k` int(11) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `c` char(120) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `pad` char(60) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `k_1` (`k`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=1000001 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1
mysql> explain select * from sbtest1 where id = round(rand()*10000, 0);
+----+-------------+---------+------------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+--------+----------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table   | partitions | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows   | filtered | Extra       |
+----+-------------+---------+------------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+--------+----------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | sbtest1 | NULL       | ALL  | NULL          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 986400 |    10.00 | Using where |
+----+-------------+---------+------------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+--------+----------+-------------+

So it is a primary key, but MySQL does not use an index, and it returns two rows. Is this a bug?

Deterministic vs nondeterministic functions

Turned out it is not a bug at all. It is pretty logical behavior from MySQL, but it is not what we would expect. First, why a full table scan? Well, rand() is nondeterministic function. That means we do not know what it will return ahead of time, and actually that is exactly the purpose of rand() – to return a random value. In this case, it is only logical to evaluate the function for each row, each time, and compare the results. i.e. in our case

  1. Read row 1, get the value of id, evaluate the value of RAND(), compare
  2. Proceed using the same algorithm with the remaining rows.

In other words, as the value of rand() is not known (not evaluated) beforehand, so we can’t use an index.

And in this case – rand() function – we have another interesting consequence. For larger tables with an auto_increment primary key, the probability of matching the rand() value and the auto_increment value is higher, so we can get multiple rows back. In fact, if we read the whole table from the beginning and keep comparing the auto_inc sequence with “the roll of the dice”, we can get many rows back.

That behavior is totally counter-intuitive. Nevertheless, to me, it’s also the only correct behavior.

We expect to have the rand() function evaluated before running the query.  This can actually be achieved by assigning rand() to a variable:

mysql> set @id=round(rand()*10000, 0); select @id; select * from sbtest1 where id = @id;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
+------+
| @id  |
+------+
| 6068 |
+------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
+------+--------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+-------------------------------------------------------------+
| id   | k      | c                                                                                                                       | pad                                                         |
+------+--------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+-------------------------------------------------------------+
| 6068 | 502782 | 84971025350-12845068791-61736600622-38249796467-85706778555-74134284808-24438972515-17848828748-86869270666-01547789681 | 17507194006-70651503059-23792945260-94159543806-65683812344 |
+------+--------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+-------------------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
mysql> explain select * from sbtest1 where id = @id;
+----+-------------+---------+------------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+----------+-------+
| id | select_type | table   | partitions | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref   | rows | filtered | Extra |
+----+-------------+---------+------------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+----------+-------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | sbtest1 | NULL       | const | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | const |    1 |   100.00 | NULL  |
+----+-------------+---------+------------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+----------+-------+
1 row in set, 1 warning (0.01 sec)

This would meet our expectations.

There are (at least) two bug reports filed, with very interesting discussion:

  1. rand() used in scalar functions returns multiple rows
  2. SELECT on PK with ROUND(RAND()) give wrong errors

Other databases

I wanted to see how it works in other SQL databases. In PostgreSQL, the behavior is exactly the same as MySQL:

postgres=# select * from t2 where id = cast(random()*10000 as int);
  id  |    c
------+---------
 4093 | asdasda
 9378 | asdasda
(2 rows)
postgres=# select * from t2 where id = cast(random()*10000 as int);
  id  |    c
------+---------
 5988 | asdasda
 6674 | asdasda
(2 rows)
postgres=# explain select * from t2 where id = cast(random()*10000 as int);
                             QUERY PLAN
--------------------------------------------------------------------
 Seq Scan on t2  (cost=0.00..159837.60 rows=1 width=12)
   Filter: (id = ((random() * '10000'::double precision))::integer)
(2 rows)

And SQLite seems different, evaluating the random() function beforehand:

sqlite> select * from t2 where id = cast(abs(CAST(random() AS REAL))/92233720368547 as int);
16239|asdsadasdsa
sqlite> select * from t2 where id = cast(abs(CAST(random() AS REAL))/92233720368547 as int);
32910|asdsadasdsa
sqlite> select * from t2 where id = cast(abs(CAST(random() AS REAL))/92233720368547 as int);
58658|asdsadasdsa
sqlite> explain select * from t2 where id = cast(abs(CAST(random() AS REAL))/92233720368547 as int);
addr  opcode         p1    p2    p3    p4             p5  comment
----  -------------  ----  ----  ----  -------------  --  -------------
0     Init           0     12    0                    00  Start at 12
1     OpenRead       0     30182  0     2              00  root=30182 iDb=0; t2
2     Function0      0     0     3     random(0)      00  r[3]=func(r[0])
3     Cast           3     69    0                    00  affinity(r[3])
4     Function0      0     3     2     abs(1)         01  r[2]=func(r[3])
5     Divide         4     2     1                    00  r[1]=r[2]/r[4]
6     Cast           1     68    0                    00  affinity(r[1])
7     SeekRowid      0     11    1                    00  intkey=r[1]; pk
8     Copy           1     5     0                    00  r[5]=r[1]
9     Column         0     1     6                    00  r[6]=t2.c
10    ResultRow      5     2     0                    00  output=r[5..6]
11    Halt           0     0     0                    00
12    Transaction    0     0     2     0              01  usesStmtJournal=0
13    Int64          0     4     0     92233720368547  00 r[4]=92233720368547
14    Goto           0     1     0                    00

Conclusion

Be careful when using MySQL nondeterministic functions in  a “where” condition – rand() is the most interesting example – as their behavior may surprise you. Many people believe this to be a bug that should be fixed. Let me know in the comments: do you think it is a bug or not (and why)? I would also be interested to know how it works in other, non-opensource databases (Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, etc)

PS: Finally, I’ve got a “clever” idea – what if I “trick” MySQL by using the deterministic keyword…

MySQL stored functions: deterministic vs not deterministic

So, I wanted to see how it works with MySQL stored functions if they are assigned “deterministic” and “not deterministic” keywords. First, I wanted to “trick” mysql and pass the deterministic to the stored function but use rand() inside. Ok, this is not what you really want to do!

DELIMITER $$
CREATE FUNCTION myrand() RETURNS INT
    DETERMINISTIC
BEGIN
 RETURN round(rand()*10000, 0);
END$$
DELIMITER ;

From MySQL manual about MySQL stored routines we can read:

Assessment of the nature of a routine is based on the “honesty” of the creator: MySQL does not check that a routine declared DETERMINISTIC is free of statements that produce nondeterministic results. However, misdeclaring a routine might affect results or affect performance. Declaring a nondeterministic routine as DETERMINISTIC might lead to unexpected results by causing the optimizer to make incorrect execution plan choices. Declaring a deterministic routine as NONDETERMINISTIC might diminish performance by causing available optimizations not to be used.

The result is interesting:

mysql> select myrand();
+----------+
| myrand() |
+----------+
|     4202 |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
mysql> select myrand();
+----------+
| myrand() |
+----------+
|     7548 |
+----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
mysql> explain select * from t2 where id = myrand()\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: NULL
   partitions: NULL
         type: NULL
possible_keys: NULL
          key: NULL
      key_len: NULL
          ref: NULL
         rows: NULL
     filtered: NULL
        Extra: Impossible WHERE noticed after reading const tables
1 row in set, 1 warning (0.00 sec)
mysql> show warnings;
+-------+------+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Level | Code | Message                                                                        |
+-------+------+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Note  | 1003 | /* select#1 */ select '2745' AS `id`,'asasdas' AS `c` from `test`.`t2` where 0 |
+-------+------+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
mysql> select * from t2 where id = 4202;
+------+---------+
| id   | c       |
+------+---------+
| 4202 | asasdas |
+------+---------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
mysql> select * from t2 where id = 2745;
+------+---------+
| id   | c       |
+------+---------+
| 2745 | asasdas |
+------+---------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

So MySQL optimizer detected the problem (somehow).

If I use the NOT DETERMINISTIC keyword, then MySQL works the same as when using the rand() function:

DELIMITER $$
CREATE FUNCTION myrand2() RETURNS INT
   NOT DETERMINISTIC
BEGIN
 RETURN round(rand()*10000, 0);
END$$
DELIMITER ;
mysql> explain select * from t2 where id = myrand2()\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: t2
   partitions: NULL
         type: ALL
possible_keys: NULL
          key: NULL
      key_len: NULL
          ref: NULL
         rows: 262208
     filtered: 10.00
        Extra: Using where
1 row in set, 1 warning (0.00 sec)

 


Photo by dylan nolte on Unsplash

Dec
04
2018
--

Percona Server for MySQL 5.7.24-26 Is Now Available

Percona Server for MySQL

Percona Server for MySQLPercona announces the release of Percona Server for MySQL 5.7.24-26 on December 4, 2018 (downloads are available here and from the Percona Software Repositories). This release merges changes of MySQL 5.7.24, including all the bug fixes in it. Percona Server for MySQL 5.7.24-26 is now the current GA release in the 5.7 series. All of Percona’s software is open-source and free.

This release includes fixes to the following upstream CVEs (Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures): CVE-2016-9843, CVE-2018-3155, CVE-2018-3143, CVE-2018-3156, CVE-2018-3251, CVE-2018-3133, CVE-2018-3144, CVE-2018-3185, CVE-2018-3247CVE-2018-3187, CVE-2018-3174, CVE-2018-3171. For more information, see Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory – October 2018.

Improvements

  • PS-4790: Improve user statistics accuracy

Bugs Fixed

  • Slave replication could break if upstream bug #74145 (FLUSH LOGS improperly disables the logging if the log file cannot be accessed) occurred in master. Bug fixed PS-1017 (Upstream #83232).
  • Setting the tokudb_last_lock_timeout variable via the command line could cause the server to stop working when the actual timeout took place. Bug fixed PS-4943.
  • Dropping a TokuDB table with non-alphanumeric characters could lead to a crash. Bug fixed PS-4979.
  • When using the MyRocks storage engine, the server could crash after running ALTER TABLE DROP INDEX on a slave. Bug fixed PS-4744.
  • The audit log could be corrupted when the audit_log_rotations variable was changed at runtime. Bug fixed PS-4950.

Other Bugs Fixed

  • PS-4781: sql_yacc.yy uses SQLCOM_SELECT instead of SQLCOM_SHOW_XXXX_STATS
  • PS-4881: Add LLVM/clang 7 to Travis-CI
  • PS-4825: Backport MTR fixes from 8.0
  • PS-4998: Valgrind: compilation fails with: writing to ‘struct buf_buddy_free_t’ with no trivial copy-assignment
  • PS-4980: Valgrind: Syscall param write(buf) points to uninitialised byte(s): Event_encrypter::encrypt_and_write()
  • PS-4982: Valgrind: Syscall param io_submit(PWRITE) points to uninitialised byte(s): buf_dblwr_write_block_to_datafile()
  • PS-4983: Valgrind: Syscall param io_submit(PWRITE) points to uninitialised byte(s): buf_flush_write_block_low()
  • PS-4951: Many libc-related Valgrind errors on CentOS7
  • PS-5012: Valgrind: misused UNIV_MEM_ALLOC after ut_zalloc_nokey
  • PS-4908: UBSan and valgrind errors with encrypted temporary files
  • PS-4532: Replace obsolete HAVE_purify with HAVE_VALGRIND in ha_rocksdb.cc
  • PS-4955: Backport mysqld fixes for valgrind warnings from 8.0
  • PS-4529: MTR: index_merge_rocksdb2 inadvertently tests InnoDB instead of MyRocks
  • PS-5056: handle_fatal_signal (sig=11) in ha_tokudb::write_row
  • PS-5084: innodb_buffer_pool_size is an uninitialized variable
  • PS-4836: Missing PFS signed variable aggregation
  • PS-5033: rocksdb.show_engine: Result content mismatch
  • PS-5034: rocksdb.rocksdb: Result content mismatch
  • PS-5035: rocksdb.show_table_status: 1051: Unknown table ‘db_new’

Find the release notes for Percona Server for MySQL 5.6.24-26 in our online documentation. Report bugs in the Jira bug tracker.

 

Dec
03
2018
--

Percona Live 2019 Call for Papers is Now Open!

Percona Live CFP 2019

Percona Live 2019Announcing the opening of the Percona Live 2019 Open Source Database Conference call for papers. It will be open from now until January 20, 2019. The Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2019 takes place May 28-30 in Austin, Texas.

Our theme this year is CONNECT. ACCELERATE. INNOVATE.

As a speaker at Percona Live, you’ll have the opportunity to CONNECT with your peers—open source database experts and enthusiasts who share your commitment to improving knowledge and exchanging ideas. ACCELERATE your projects and career by presenting at the premier open source database event, a great way to build your personal and company brands. And influence the evolution of the open source software movement by demonstrating how you INNOVATE!

Community initiatives remain core to the open source ethos, and we are proud of the contribution we make with Percona Live in showcasing thought leading practices in the open source database world.

With a nod to innovation, this year we are introducing a business track to benefit those business leaders who are exploring the use of open source and are interested in learning more about its costs and benefits.

Speaking Opportunities

The Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2019 Call for Papers is open until January 20, 2019. We invite you to submit your speaking proposal for breakout, tutorial or lightning talk sessions. Classes and talks are invited for Foundation (either entry-level or of general interest to all), Core (intermediate), and Masterclass (advanced) levels.

  • Breakout Session. Broadly cover a technology area using specific examples. Sessions should be either 25 minutes or 50 minutes in length (including Q&A).
  • Tutorial Session. Present a technical session that aims for a level between a training class and a conference breakout session. We encourage attendees to bring and use laptops for working on detailed and hands-on presentations. Tutorials will be three or six hours in length (including Q&A).
  • Lightning Talk. Give a five-minute presentation focusing on one key point that interests the open source community: technical, lighthearted or entertaining talks on new ideas, a successful project, a cautionary story, a quick tip or demonstration.

If your proposal is selected for breakout or tutorial sessions, you will receive a complimentary full conference pass.

Topics and Themes

We want proposals that cover the many aspects of application development using all open source databases, as well as new and interesting ways to monitor and manage database environments. Did you just embrace open source databases this year? What are the technical and business values of moving to or using open source databases? How did you convince your company to make the move? Was there tangible ROI?

Best practices and current trends, including design, application development, performance optimization, HA and clustering, cloud, containers and new technologies –  what’s holding your focus? Share your case studies, experiences and technical knowledge with an engaged audience of open source peers.

In the submission entry, indicate which of these themes your proposal best fits: tutorial, business needs; case studies/use cases; operations; or development. Also include which track(s) from the list below would be best suited to your talk.

Tracks

The conference committee is looking for proposals that cover the many aspects of using, deploying and managing open source databases, including:

  • MySQL. Do you have an opinion on what is new and exciting in MySQL? With the release of MySQL 8.0, are you using the latest features? How and why? Are they helping you solve any business issues, or making deployment of applications and websites easier, faster or more efficient? Did the new release influence you to change to MySQL? What do you see as the biggest impact of the MySQL 8.0 release? Do you use MySQL in conjunction with other databases in your environment?
  • MariaDB. Talks highlighting MariaDB and MariaDB compatible databases and related tools. Discuss the latest features, how to optimize performance, and demonstrate the best practices you’ve adopted from real production use cases and applications.
  • PostgreSQL. Why do you use PostgreSQL as opposed to other SQL options? Have you done a comparison or benchmark of PostgreSQL vs. other types of databases related to your applications? Why, and what were the results? How does PostgreSQL help you with application performance or deployment? How do you use PostgreSQL in conjunction with other databases in your environment?
  • MongoDB. Has the 4.0 release improved your experience in application development or time-to-market? How are the new features making your database environment better? What is it about MongoDB 4.0 that excites you? What are your experiences with Atlas? Have you moved to it, and has it lived up to its promises? Do you use MongoDB in conjunction with other databases in your environment?
  • Polyglot Persistence. How are you using multiple open source databases together? What tools and technologies are helping you to get them interacting efficiently? In what ways are multiple databases working together helping to solve critical business issues? What are the best practices you’ve discovered in your production environments?
  • Observability and Monitoring. How are you designing your database-powered applications for observability? What monitoring tools and methods are providing you with the best application and database insights for running your business? How are you using tools to troubleshoot issues and bottlenecks? How are you observing your production environment in order to understand the critical aspects of your deployments? 
  • Kubernetes. How are you running open source databases on the Kubernetes, OpenShift and other container platforms? What software are you using to facilitate their use? What best practices and processes are making containers a vital part of your business strategy? 
  • Automation and AI. How are you using automation to run databases at scale? Are you using automation to create self-running, self-healing, and self-tuning databases? Is machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) helping you create a new generation of database automation?
  • Migration to Open Source Databases. How are you migrating to open source databases? Are you migrating on-premises or to the cloud? What are the tools and strategies you’ve used that have been successful, and what have you learned during and after the migration? Do you have real-world migration stories that illustrate how best to migrate?
  • Database Security and Compliance. All of us have experienced security and compliance challenges. From new legislation like GDPR, PCI and HIPAA, exploited software bugs, or new threats such as ransomware attacks, when is enough “enough”? What are your best practices for preventing incursions? How do you maintain compliance as you move to the cloud? Are you finding that security and compliance requirements are preventing your ability to be agile?
  • Other Open Source Databases. There are many, many great open source database software and solutions we can learn about. Submit other open source database talk ideas – we welcome talks for both established database technologies as well as the emerging new ones that no one has yet heard about (but should).
  • Business and Enterprise. Has your company seen big improvements in ROI from using Open Source Databases? Are there efficiency levels or interesting case studies you want to share? How did you convince your company to move to Open Source?

How to Respond to the Call for Papers

For information on how to submit your proposal, visit our call for papers page.

Sponsorship

If you would like to obtain a sponsor pack for Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2019, you will find more information including a prospectus on our sponsorship page. You are welcome to contact me, Bronwyn Campbell, directly.

Nov
29
2018
--

Percona Server for MySQL 5.6.42-84.2 Is Now Available

Percona Server for MySQL

Percona Server for MySQL 5.6Percona announces the release of Percona Server 5.6.42-84.2 on November 29, 2018 (Downloads are available here and from the Percona Software Repositories).

Based on MySQL 5.6.42, including all the bug fixes in it, Percona Server 5.6.42-84.2 is the current GA release in the Percona Server 5.6 series. All of Percona‘s software is open-source and free.

Improvements

  • PS-4790: Improve user statistics accuracy

Bugs Fixed

  • Slave replication could break if upstream bug #74145 (FLUSH LOGS improperly disables the logging if the log file cannot be accessed) occurred in master. Bug fixed PS-1017 (Upstream #83232).
  • The binary log could be corrupted when the disk partition used for temporary. files (tmpdir system variable) had little free space. Bug fixed PS-1107 (Upstream #72457).
  • PURGE CHANGED_PAGE_BITMAPS did not work when the innodb_data_home_dir system variable was used. Bug fixed PS-4723.
  • Setting the tokudb_last_lock_timeout variable via the command line could cause the server to stop working when the actual timeout took place. Bug fixed PS-4943.
  • Dropping TokuDB table with non-alphanumeric characters could lead to a crash. Bug fixed PS-4979.

Other bugs fixed

  • PS-4781: sql_yacc.yy uses SQLCOM_SELECT instead of SQLCOM_SHOW_XXXX_STATS
  • PS-4529: MTR: index_merge_rocksdb2 inadvertently tests InnoDB instead of MyRocks
  • PS-4746: Revert our fix for PS-3851 (Percona Ver 5.6.39-83.1 Failing assertion: sym_node->table != NULL)
  • PS-4773: Percona Server sources can’t be compiled without server
  • PS-4785: Setting version_suffix to NULL leads to handle_fatal_signal (sig=11) in Sys_var_version::global_value_ptr
  • PS-4813: Using flush_caches leads to SELinux denial errors
  • PS-4881: Add LLVM/clang 7 to Travis-CI

Find the release notes for Percona Server for MySQL 5.6.42-84.2 in our online documentation. Report bugs in the Jira bug tracker.

 

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