Dec
11
2018
--

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation adds etcd to its open-source stable

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), the open-source home of projects like Kubernetes and Vitess, today announced that its technical committee has voted to bring a new project on board. That project is etcd, the distributed key-value store that was first developed by CoreOS (now owned by Red Hat, which in turn will soon be owned by IBM). Red Hat has now contributed this project to the CNCF.

Etcd, which is written in Go, is already a major component of many Kubernetes deployments, where it functions as a source of truth for coordinating clusters and managing the state of the system. Other open-source projects that use etcd include Cloud Foundry, and companies that use it in production include Alibaba, ING, Pinterest, Uber, The New York Times and Nordstrom.

“Kubernetes and many other projects like Cloud Foundry depend on etcd for reliable data storage. We’re excited to have etcd join CNCF as an incubation project and look forward to cultivating its community by improving its technical documentation, governance and more,” said Chris Aniszczyk, COO of CNCF, in today’s announcement. “Etcd is a fantastic addition to our community of projects.”

Today, etcd has well over 450 contributors and nine maintainers from eight different companies. The fact that it ended up at the CNCF is only logical, given that the foundation is also the host of Kubernetes. With this, the CNCF now plays host to 17 projects that fall under its “incubated technologies” umbrella. In addition to etcd, these include OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, containerd, rkt, CNI, Jaeger, Notary, TUF, Vitess, NATS Helm, Rook and Harbor. Kubernetes, Prometheus and Envoy have already graduated from this incubation stage.

That’s a lot of projects for one foundation to manage, but the CNCF community is also extraordinarily large. This week alone about 8,000 developers are converging on Seattle for KubeCon/CloudNativeCon, the organization’s biggest event yet, to talk all things containers. It surely helps that the CNCF has managed to bring competitors like AWS, Microsoft, Google, IBM and Oracle under a single roof to collaboratively work on building these new technologies. There is a risk of losing focus here, though, something that happened to the OpenStack project when it went through a similar growth and hype phase. It’ll be interesting to see how the CNCF will manage this as it brings on more projects (with Istio, the increasingly popular service mesh, being a likely candidate for coming over to the CNCF as well).

Dec
03
2018
--

Percona Live 2019 Call for Papers is Now Open!

Percona Live CFP 2019

Percona Live 2019Announcing the opening of the Percona Live 2019 Open Source Database Conference call for papers. It will be open from now until January 20, 2019. The Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2019 takes place May 28-30 in Austin, Texas.

Our theme this year is CONNECT. ACCELERATE. INNOVATE.

As a speaker at Percona Live, you’ll have the opportunity to CONNECT with your peers—open source database experts and enthusiasts who share your commitment to improving knowledge and exchanging ideas. ACCELERATE your projects and career by presenting at the premier open source database event, a great way to build your personal and company brands. And influence the evolution of the open source software movement by demonstrating how you INNOVATE!

Community initiatives remain core to the open source ethos, and we are proud of the contribution we make with Percona Live in showcasing thought leading practices in the open source database world.

With a nod to innovation, this year we are introducing a business track to benefit those business leaders who are exploring the use of open source and are interested in learning more about its costs and benefits.

Speaking Opportunities

The Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2019 Call for Papers is open until January 20, 2019. We invite you to submit your speaking proposal for breakout, tutorial or lightning talk sessions. Classes and talks are invited for Foundation (either entry-level or of general interest to all), Core (intermediate), and Masterclass (advanced) levels.

  • Breakout Session. Broadly cover a technology area using specific examples. Sessions should be either 25 minutes or 50 minutes in length (including Q&A).
  • Tutorial Session. Present a technical session that aims for a level between a training class and a conference breakout session. We encourage attendees to bring and use laptops for working on detailed and hands-on presentations. Tutorials will be three or six hours in length (including Q&A).
  • Lightning Talk. Give a five-minute presentation focusing on one key point that interests the open source community: technical, lighthearted or entertaining talks on new ideas, a successful project, a cautionary story, a quick tip or demonstration.

If your proposal is selected for breakout or tutorial sessions, you will receive a complimentary full conference pass.

Topics and Themes

We want proposals that cover the many aspects of application development using all open source databases, as well as new and interesting ways to monitor and manage database environments. Did you just embrace open source databases this year? What are the technical and business values of moving to or using open source databases? How did you convince your company to make the move? Was there tangible ROI?

Best practices and current trends, including design, application development, performance optimization, HA and clustering, cloud, containers and new technologies –  what’s holding your focus? Share your case studies, experiences and technical knowledge with an engaged audience of open source peers.

In the submission entry, indicate which of these themes your proposal best fits: tutorial, business needs; case studies/use cases; operations; or development. Also include which track(s) from the list below would be best suited to your talk.

Tracks

The conference committee is looking for proposals that cover the many aspects of using, deploying and managing open source databases, including:

  • MySQL. Do you have an opinion on what is new and exciting in MySQL? With the release of MySQL 8.0, are you using the latest features? How and why? Are they helping you solve any business issues, or making deployment of applications and websites easier, faster or more efficient? Did the new release influence you to change to MySQL? What do you see as the biggest impact of the MySQL 8.0 release? Do you use MySQL in conjunction with other databases in your environment?
  • MariaDB. Talks highlighting MariaDB and MariaDB compatible databases and related tools. Discuss the latest features, how to optimize performance, and demonstrate the best practices you’ve adopted from real production use cases and applications.
  • PostgreSQL. Why do you use PostgreSQL as opposed to other SQL options? Have you done a comparison or benchmark of PostgreSQL vs. other types of databases related to your applications? Why, and what were the results? How does PostgreSQL help you with application performance or deployment? How do you use PostgreSQL in conjunction with other databases in your environment?
  • MongoDB. Has the 4.0 release improved your experience in application development or time-to-market? How are the new features making your database environment better? What is it about MongoDB 4.0 that excites you? What are your experiences with Atlas? Have you moved to it, and has it lived up to its promises? Do you use MongoDB in conjunction with other databases in your environment?
  • Polyglot Persistence. How are you using multiple open source databases together? What tools and technologies are helping you to get them interacting efficiently? In what ways are multiple databases working together helping to solve critical business issues? What are the best practices you’ve discovered in your production environments?
  • Observability and Monitoring. How are you designing your database-powered applications for observability? What monitoring tools and methods are providing you with the best application and database insights for running your business? How are you using tools to troubleshoot issues and bottlenecks? How are you observing your production environment in order to understand the critical aspects of your deployments? 
  • Kubernetes. How are you running open source databases on the Kubernetes, OpenShift and other container platforms? What software are you using to facilitate their use? What best practices and processes are making containers a vital part of your business strategy? 
  • Automation and AI. How are you using automation to run databases at scale? Are you using automation to create self-running, self-healing, and self-tuning databases? Is machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) helping you create a new generation of database automation?
  • Migration to Open Source Databases. How are you migrating to open source databases? Are you migrating on-premises or to the cloud? What are the tools and strategies you’ve used that have been successful, and what have you learned during and after the migration? Do you have real-world migration stories that illustrate how best to migrate?
  • Database Security and Compliance. All of us have experienced security and compliance challenges. From new legislation like GDPR, PCI and HIPAA, exploited software bugs, or new threats such as ransomware attacks, when is enough “enough”? What are your best practices for preventing incursions? How do you maintain compliance as you move to the cloud? Are you finding that security and compliance requirements are preventing your ability to be agile?
  • Other Open Source Databases. There are many, many great open source database software and solutions we can learn about. Submit other open source database talk ideas – we welcome talks for both established database technologies as well as the emerging new ones that no one has yet heard about (but should).
  • Business and Enterprise. Has your company seen big improvements in ROI from using Open Source Databases? Are there efficiency levels or interesting case studies you want to share? How did you convince your company to move to Open Source?

How to Respond to the Call for Papers

For information on how to submit your proposal, visit our call for papers page.

Sponsorship

If you would like to obtain a sponsor pack for Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2019, you will find more information including a prospectus on our sponsorship page. You are welcome to contact me, Bronwyn Campbell, directly.

Nov
29
2018
--

AWS announces a slew of new Lambda features

AWS launched Lambda in 2015 and with it helped popularize serverless computing. You simply write code (event triggers) and AWS deals with whatever compute, memory and storage you need to make that work. Today at AWS re:Invent in Las Vegas, the company announced several new features to make it more developer friendly, while acknowledging that even while serverless reduced complexity, it still requires more sophisticated tools as it matures

It’s called serverless because you don’t have to worry about the underlying servers. The cloud vendors take care of all that for you, serving whatever resources you need to run your event and no more. It means you no longer have to worry about coding for all your infrastructure and you only pay for the computing you need at any given moment to make the application work.

The way AWS works is that it tends to release something, then builds more functionality on top of a base service as it sees increasing requirements as customers use it. As Amazon CTO Werner Vogels pointed out in his keynote on Thursday, developers debate about tools and everyone has their own idea of what tools they bring to the task every day.

For starters, they decided to please the language folks introducing support for new languages. Those developers who use Ruby can now use Ruby Support for AWS Lambda. “Now it’s possible to write Lambda functions as idiomatic Ruby code, and run them on AWS. The AWS SDK for Ruby is included in the Lambda execution environment by default,” Chris Munns from AWS wrote in a blog post introducing the new language support.

If C++ is your thing, AWS announced C++ Lambda Runtime. If neither of those match your programming language tastes, AWS opened it up for just about any language with the new Lambda Runtime API, which Danilo Poccia from AWS described in a blog post as “a simple interface to use any programming language, or a specific language version, for developing your functions.”

AWS didn’t want to stop with languages though. They also recognize that even though Lambda (and serverless in general) is designed to remove a level of complexity for developers, that doesn’t mean that all serverless applications consist of simple event triggers. As developers build more sophisticated serverless apps, they have to bring in system components and compose multiple pieces together, as Vogels explained in his keynote today.

To address this requirement, the company introduced Lambda Layers, which they describe as “a way to centrally manage code and data that is shared across multiple functions.” This could be custom code used by multiple functions or a way to share code used to simplify business logic.

As Lambda matures, developer requirements grow and these announcements and others are part of trying to meet those needs.

more AWS re:Invent 2018 coverage

Nov
28
2018
--

AWS is bringing the cloud on prem with Outposts

AWS has always been the pure cloud vendor, and even though it has given a nod to hybrid, it is now fully embracing it. Today in conjunction with VMware, it announced a pair of options to bring AWS into the data center.

Yes, you read it correctly. You can now put AWS into your data center with AWS hardware, the same design they use in their own data centers. The two new products are part of AWS Outposts.

There are two Outposts variations — VMware Cloud on AWS Outposts and AWS Outposts. The first uses the VMware control panel. The second allows customers to run compute and storage on premises using the same AWS APIs that are used in the AWS cloud.

In fact, VMware CEO Pat  Gelsinger joined AWS CEO Andy Jassy onstage at AWS re:Invent for a joint announcement. The two companies have been working together for some time to bring VMware to the AWS cloud. Part of this announcement flips that on its head, bringing the AWS cloud on prem to work with VMware. In both cases, AWS sells you their hardware, installs it if you wish, and will even maintain it for you.

This is an area that AWS has lagged, preferring the vision of a cloud, rather than moving back to the data center, but it’s a tacit acknowledgment that customers want to operate in both places for the foreseeable future.

The announcement also extends the company’s cloud-native-like vision. On Monday, the company announced Transit Gateways, which is designed to provide a single way to manage network resources, whether they live in the cloud or on prem.

Now AWS is bringing its cloud on prem, something that Microsoft, Canonical, Oracle and others have had for some time. It’s worth noting that today’s announcement is a public preview. The actual release is expected in the second half of next year.

more AWS re:Invent 2018 coverage

Nov
28
2018
--

Amazon Textract brings intelligence to OCR

One of the challenges just about every business faces is converting forms to a useful digital format. This has typically involved using human data entry clerks to enter the data into the computer. State of the art involved using OCR to read forms automatically, but AWS CEO Andy Jassy explained that OCR is basically just a dumb text reader. It doesn’t recognize text types. Amazon wanted to change that and today it announced Amazon Textract, an intelligent OCR tool to move data from forms to a more useable digital format.

In an example, he showed a form with tables. Regular OCR didn’t recognize the table and interpreted it as a string of text. Textract is designed to recognize common page elements like a table and pull the data in a sensible way.

Jassy said that forms also often change, and if you are using a template as a workaround for OCR’s lack of intelligence, the template breaks if you move anything. To fix that, Textract is smart enough to understand common data types like Social Security numbers, dates of birth and addresses, and interprets them correctly no matter where they fall on the page.

“We have taught Textract to recognize this set of characters is a date of birth and this is a Social Security number. If forms change, Textract won’t miss it,” Jassy explained.

more AWS re:Invent 2018 coverage

Nov
28
2018
--

AWS announces new Inferentia machine learning chip

AWS is not content to cede any part of any market to any company. When it comes to machine learning chips, names like Nvidia or Google come to mind, but today at AWS re:Invent in Las Vegas, the company announced a new dedicated machine learning chip of its own called Inferentia.

“Inferentia will be a very high-throughput, low-latency, sustained-performance very cost-effective processor,” AWS CEO Andy Jassy explained during the announcement.

Holger Mueller, an analyst with Constellation Research, says that while Amazon is far behind, this is a good step for them as companies try to differentiate their machine learning approaches in the future.

“The speed and cost of running machine learning operations — ideally in deep learning — are a competitive differentiator for enterprises. Speed advantages will make or break success of enterprises (and nations when you think of warfare). That speed can only be achieved with custom hardware, and Inferentia is AWS’s first step to get in to this game,” Mueller told TechCrunch. As he pointed out, Google has a 2-3 year head start with its TPU infrastructure.

Inferentia supports popular frameworks like INT8, FP16 and mixed precision. What’s more, it supports multiple machine learning frameworks, including TensorFlow, Caffe2 and ONNX.

Of course, being an Amazon product, it also supports data from popular AWS products such as EC2, SageMaker and the new Elastic Inference Engine announced today.

While the chip was announced today, AWS CEO Andy Jassy indicated it won’t actually be available until next year.

more AWS re:Invent 2018 coverage

Nov
28
2018
--

AWS launches new time series database

AWS announced a new time series database today at AWS re:Invent in Las Vegas. The new product called DynamoDB On-Demand is a fully managed database designed to track items over time, which can be particularly useful for Internet of Things scenarios.

“With time series data each data point consists of a timestamp and one or more attributes and it really measures how things change over time and helps drive real time decisions,” AWS CEO Andy Jassy explained.

He sees a problem though with existing open source and commercial solutions, which says don’t scale well and hard to manage. This is of course a problem that a cloud service like AWS often helps solve.

Not surprising as customers were looking for a good time series database solution, AWS decided to create one themselves. “Today we are introducing Amazon DynamoDB on-demand, a flexible new billing option for DynamoDB capable of serving thousands of requests per second without capacity planning,” Danilo Poccia from AWS wrote in the blog post introducing the new service.

Jassy said that they built DynamoDB on-demand from the ground up with an architecture that organizes data by time intervals and enables time series specific data compression, which leads to less scanning and faster performance.

He claims it will be a thousand times faster at a tenth of cost, and of course it scales up and down as required and includes all of the analytics capabilities you need to understand all of the data you are tracking.

This new service is available across the world starting today.

more AWS re:Invent 2018 coverage

Nov
28
2018
--

AWS tries to lure Windows users with Amazon FSx for Windows File Server

Amazon has had storage options for Linux file servers for some time, but it recognizes that a number of companies still use Windows file servers, and they are not content to cede that market to Microsoft. Today the company announced Amazon FSx for Windows File Server to provide a fully compatible Windows option.

“You get a native Windows file system backed by fully-managed Windows file servers, accessible via the widely adopted SMB (Server Message Block) protocol. Built on SSD storage, Amazon FSx for Windows File Server delivers the throughput, IOPS, and consistent sub-millisecond performance that you (and your Windows applications) expect,” AWS’s Jeff Barr wrote in a blog post introducing the new feature.

That means if you use this service, you have a first-class Windows system with all of the compatibility with Windows services that you would expect, such as Active Directory and Windows Explorer.

AWS CEO Andy Jassy introduced the new feature today at AWS re:Invent, the company’s customer conference going on in Las Vegas this week. He said that even though Windows File Server usage is diminishing as more IT pros turn to Linux, there are still a fair number of customers who want a Windows-compatible system and they wanted to provide a service for them to move their Windows files to the cloud.

Of course, it doesn’t hurt that it provides a path for Microsoft customers to use AWS instead of turning to Azure for these workloads. Companies undertaking a multi-cloud strategy should like having a fully compatible option.

more AWS re:Invent 2018 coverage

Nov
27
2018
--

AWS launches a base station for satellites as a service

Today at AWS Re:invent in Las Vegas, AWS announced a new service for satellite providers with the launch of AWS Ground Station, the first fully-managed ground station as a service.

With this new service, AWS will provide ground antennas through their existing network of worldwide availability zones, as well as data processing services to simplify the entire data retrieval and processing process for satellite companies, or for others who consume the satellite data.

Satellite operators need to get data down from the satellite, process it and then make it available for developers to use in applications. In that regard, it’s not that much different from any IoT device. It just so happens that these are flying around in space.

AWS CEO Andy Jassy pointed out that they hadn’t really considered a service like this until they had customers asking for it. “Customers said that we have so much data in space with so many applications that want to use that data. Why don’t you make it easier,” Jassy said. He said they thought about that and figured they could put their vast worldwide network to bear on the problem. .

Prior to this service, companies had to build these base stations themselves to get the data down from the satellites as they passed over the base stations on earth wherever those base stations happened to be. It required that providers buy land and build the hardware, then deal with the data themselves. By offering this as a managed service, it greatly simplifies every aspect of the workflow.

Holger Mueller, an analyst at Constellation Research says that the service will help put the satellite data into the hands of developers faster. “To rule real world application use cases you need to make maps and real-time spatial data available in an easy-to-consume, real time and affordable way,” Mueller told TechCrunch. This is precisely the type of data, you can get from satellites.

The value proposition of any cloud service has always been about reducing the resource allocation required by a company to achieve a goal. With AWS Ground Station, AWS handles every aspect of the satellite data retrieval and processing operation for the company, greatly reducing the cost and complexity associated with it.

AWS claims it can save up to 80 percent by using an on-demand model over ownership. They are starting with two ground stations today as they launch the service, but plan to expand it to 12 by the middle of next year.

Customers and partners involved in the Ground Station preview included Lockheed Martin, Open Cosmos, HawkEye360 and DigitalGlobe, among others.

more AWS re:Invent 2018 coverage

Nov
26
2018
--

Percona at AWS Re:Invent 2018!

AWS re:Invent

Come see Percona at AWS re:Invent from November 26-30, 2018 in booth 1605 in The Venetian Hotel Expo Hall.

Percona is a Bronze sponsor of AWS re:Invent in 2018 and will be there for the whole show! Drop by booth 1605 in The Venetian Expo Hall to discuss how Percona’s unbiased open source databse experts can help you with your cloud database and DBaaS deployments!

Our CEO, Peter Zaitsev will be presenting a keynote called MySQL High Availability and Disaster Recovery at AWS re:Invent!

  • When: 27 November at 1:45 PM – 2:45 PM
  • Where: Bellagio Hotel, Level 1, Gauguin 2

Check out our case study with Passportal on how Percona DBaaS expertise help guarantee uptime for their AWS RDS environment.

Percona has a lot of great content on how we can help improve your AWS open source database deployment. Check out some of our resources below:

Blogs:

Case Studies:

White Papers:

Webinars:

Datasheets:

See you at the show!

Powered by WordPress | Theme: Aeros 2.0 by TheBuckmaker.com