Oct
08
2019
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Blog Poll: Adding/Upgrading Instances, Hardware, and Migration

Time for a new question in our blog poll series! This time, it’s about adding or upgrading to meet database needs.  Here’s the question: In the last 24 months, how often have you added or upgraded database instances, added hardware to existing servers, or migrated to a new hosting/cloud provider?

Last year, we asked you a few questions in a blog poll and we received a great amount of feedback. We wanted to follow up on those some of those same survey questions to see what may have changed. We’d love to hear from you!

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

This poll will be up for one month and will be maintained over in the sidebar should you wish to come back at a later date and take part. We look forward to seeing your responses!

 

Aug
27
2019
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Blog Poll: Which of These Issues Have You Experienced as Related to Your Database?

database blog poll

database blog pollOur blog poll series is back again with a new question:  Which of These Issues Have You Experienced as Related to Your Database? Unplanned downtime? Buggy code? Overworked staff? Last year, we asked you a few questions in a blog poll and we received a great amount of feedback. We wanted to follow up on those some of those same survey questions to see what may have changed over the last 12 months. We’d love to hear from you!

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

This poll will be up for one month and will be maintained over in the sidebar should you wish to come back at a later date and take part. We look forward to seeing your responses!

 

Oct
03
2018
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Percona Blog Poll: How Do You Run Your Database in the Cloud?

Cloud database poll

Cloud database pollPercona’s latest blog poll asks how you run your database in the cloud?

Join in!

Are you using a fully managed service or are you self-managing your databases in the cloud? And what provider are you relying on? Perhaps you’re using more than one. Don’t worry, you can tick multiple boxes, so please choose up to four answers. If you don’t see your solution listed, use the comments box on this blog to feedback your thoughts.

If you’d like to, you’re also welcome leave a comment to tell us about your choice—or maybe why you’re NOT planning on moving to a cloud solution in the near future. Likewise if you want to share how you’ve found your cloud deployment so far, feel free to send a comment. Thanks!

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

The post Percona Blog Poll: How Do You Run Your Database in the Cloud? appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Oct
19
2017
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Percona Blog Poll: How Do You Currently Host Applications and Databases?

Host applications and databases

Host applications and databasesPercona latest blog poll asks how you currently host applications and databases. Select an option below, or leave a comment to clarify your deployment!

With the increased need for environments that respond more quickly to changing business demands, many enterprises are moving to the cloud and hosted deployments for applications and software in order to offload development and maintenance overhead to a third party. The database is no exception. Businesses are turning to using database as a service (DBaaS) to handle their data needs.

DBaaS provides some obvious benefits:

  • Offload physical infrastructure to another vendor. It is the responsibility of whoever is providing the DBaaS service to maintain the physical environment – including hardware, software and best practices.
  • Scalability. You can add or subtract capacity as needed by just contacting your vendor. Have a big event on the horizon? Order more servers!
  • Expense. Since you no longer have shell out for operational costs or infrastructure upgrades (all handled by the vendor now), you can reduce capital and operation expenses – or at least reasonably plan on what they are going to be.

There are some potential disadvantages to a DBaaS as well:

  • Network performance issues. If your database is located off-premises, then it can be subject to network issues (or outages) that are beyond your control. These can translate into performance problems that impact the customer experience.
  • Loss of visibility. It’s harder (though not impossible) to always know what is happening with your data. Decisions around provisioning, storage and architecture are now in the hands of a third party.
  • Security and compliance. You are no longer totally in control of how secure or compliant your data is when using a DBaaS. This can be crucial if your business requires certain standards to operate in your market (healthcare, for example).

How are you hosting your database? On-premises? In the cloud? Which cloud? Is it co-located? Please answer using the poll below. Choose up to three answers. If you don’t see your solutions, use the comments to explain.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

Thanks in advance for your responses – they will help the open source community determine how databases are being hosted.

Jul
19
2017
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Blog Poll: What Operating System Do You Run Your Development Database On?

Blog Poll

Blog PollIn this post, we’ll use a blog poll to find out what operating system you use to run your development database servers.

In our last blog poll, we looked at what OS you use for your production database. Now we would like to see what you use for your development database.

As databases grow to meet more challenges and expanding application demands, they must try and get the maximum amount of performance out of available resources. How they work with an operating system can affect many variables, and help or hinder performance. The operating system you use for your database can impact consumable choices (such as hardware and memory). The operating system you use can also impact your choice of database engine as well (or vice versa).

When new projects, new applications or services or testing new architecture solutions, it makes sense to create a development environment in order to test and run scenarios before they hit production. Do you use the same OS in your development environment as you do your production environment?

Please let us know what operating system you use to run your development database. For this blog poll, we’re asking which operating system you use to actually run your development database server (not the base operating system).

If you’re running virtualized Linux on Windows, please select Linux as the OS used for development. Pick up to three that apply. Add any thoughts or other options in the comments section:

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

Thanks in advance for your responses – they will help the open source community determine how database environments are being deployed.

Jun
08
2017
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Blog Poll: What Operating System Do You Run Your Production Database On?

blog poll

blog pollIn this post, we’ll use a blog poll to find out what operating system you use to run your production database servers.

As databases grow to meet more challenges and expanding application demands, they must try and get the maximum amount of performance out of available resources. How they work with an operating system can affect many variables, and help or hinder performance. The operating system you use for your database can impact consumable choices (such as hardware and memory). The operation system you use can also impact your choice of database engine as well (or vice versa).

Please let us know what operating system you use to run your database. For this poll, we’re asking which operating system you use to actually run your production database server (not the base operating system).

If you’re running virtualized Linux on Windows, please select Linux as the OS used for development. Pick up to three that apply. Add any thoughts or other options in the comments section:

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.
Thanks in advance for your responses – they will help the open source community determine how database environments are being deployed.

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