Sep
25
2018
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Chef launches deeper integration with Microsoft Azure

DevOps automation service Chef today announced a number of new integrations with Microsoft Azure. The news, which was announced at the Microsoft Ignite conference in Orlando, Florida, focuses on helping enterprises bring their legacy applications to Azure and ranges from the public preview of Chef Automate Managed Service for Azure to the integration of Chef’s InSpec compliance product with Microsoft’s cloud platform.

With Chef Automate as a managed service on Azure, which provides ops teams with a single tool for managing and monitoring their compliance and infrastructure configurations, developers can now easily deploy and manage Chef Automate and the Chef Server from the Azure Portal. It’s a fully managed service and the company promises that businesses can get started with using it in as little as thirty minutes (though I’d take those numbers with a grain of salt).

When those configurations need to change, Chef users on Azure can also now use the Chef Workstation with Azure Cloud Shell, Azure’s command line interface. Workstation is one of Chef’s newest products and focuses on making ad-hoc configuration changes, no matter whether the node is managed by Chef or not.

And to remain in compliance, Chef is also launching an integration of its InSpec security and compliance tools with Azure. InSpec works hand in hand with Microsoft’s new Azure Policy Guest Configuration (who comes up with these names?) and allows users to automatically audit all of their applications on Azure.

“Chef gives companies the tools they need to confidently migrate to Microsoft Azure so users don’t just move their problems when migrating to the cloud, but have an understanding of the state of their assets before the migration occurs,” said Corey Scobie, the senior vice president of products and engineering at Chef, in today’s announcement. “Being able to detect and correct configuration and security issues to ensure success after migrations gives our customers the power to migrate at the right pace for their organization.”

more Microsoft Ignite 2018 coverage

Oct
28
2016
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Blog Series: MySQL Configuration Management

MySQL Configuration Management

MySQL Configuration ManagementMySQL configuration management remains a hot topic, as I’ve noticed on numerous occasions during my conversations with customers.

I thought it might be a good idea to start a blog series that goes deeper in detail into some of the different options, and what modules potentially might be used for managing your MySQL database infrastructure.

Configuration management has been around since way before the beginning of my professional career. I, myself, originally began working on integrating an infrastructure with my colleagues using Puppet.

Why is configuration management important?
  • ReproducibilityIt’s giving us the ability to provision any environment in an automated way, and feel sure that the new environment will contain the same configuration.
  • Fast restorationThanks to reproducibility, you can quickly provision machines in case of disasters. This makes sure you can focus on restoring your actual data instead of worrying about the deployment and configuration of your machines.
  • Integral part of continuous deploymentContinuous deployment is a terminology everyone loves: being able to deploy changes rapidly and automatically after automated regression testing requires a configuration management solution.
  • Compliance and securitySolutions like Puppet and Chef maintain and enforce configuration parameters on your infrastructure. This can sound bothersome at first, but it’s essential for maintaining a well-configured environment.
  • Documented environmentAlthough reading someone’s puppet code can potentially harm you beyond insanity, it provides you with the real truth about your infrastructure.
  • Efficiency and manageabilityConfiguration management can automate repetitive tasks (for example, user grants, database creation, configuration variables), as well as security updates, service restarts, etc. These can potentially bring you less work and faster rollouts.
Which players are active in this field?

The most popular open source solutions are Puppet, Chef, Ansible, and CFengine (among others). In this series, we will go deeper in the first three of them.

Let’s first start by giving you a quick, high-level introduction.

Puppet

Puppet is a language used to describe the desired state of an environment. The Puppet client reads the catalog of the expected state from the server and enforces these changes on the client. The system works based on a client/server principle.

Puppet has as default four essential components:

  • Puppet Server: A Java virtual machine offering Puppet’s core services.
  • Puppet Agent: A client library that requests configuration catalog info from the puppet-server.
  • Hiera: A key-value lookup database, which can store and modify values for specific hosts.
  • Facter: An application that keeps an inventory of the local node variables.

How can you integrate puppet in your MySQL infrastructure?

This will allow you and your team to create users, databases, install and configure MySQL

Probably my old “code from hell” module is still somewhere out there.

Chef

Chef also consists of a declarative language (like Puppet) based on Ruby which will allow you to write cookbooks for potential integrable technologies. Chef is also based on a server/client solution. The client being chef nodes, the server managing the cookbooks, catalogs and recipes.

In short, Chef consists of:

  • Chef server: Manages the multiple cookbooks and the catalog
  • Chef clients (nodes): The actual system requesting the catalog information from the chef server.
  • Workstations: This is a system that is configured to run Chef command-line tools that synchronize with a Chef-repository or the Chef server. You could also describe this as a Chef development and tooling environment.

How can you integrate Chef in your MySQL infrastructure:

Ansible

Ansible originated with something different in mind. System engineers typically chose to use their own management scripts. This can be troublesome and hard to maintain. Why wouldn’t you use something easy and automated and standardized? Ansible fills in these gaps, and simplifies management of Ansible targets.

Ansible works by connecting to your nodes (by SSH default) and pushes out Ansible modules to them. These modules represent the desired state of the node, and will be used to execute commands to attain the desired state.

This procedure is different to Puppet and Chef, which are essentially preferably client/server solutions.

Some pre-made modules for MySQL are:

Conclusion and Next Steps

Choose your poison (or magical medicine, you pick the wording), every solution has its perks.

Keep in mind that in some situations running a complicated Puppet or Chef infrastructure could be overkill. At this moment, a solution like Ansible might be a quick and easily integrable answer for you.

The next blog post will go over the Puppet Forge MySQL module, so stay tuned!

Nov
03
2015
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Chef Announces Key Acquisition And New Compliance Automation Tool

code over a keyboard Chef has been helping companies configure, manage and automate their software and infrastructure for some time. Today it made several announcements to bring that same level of automation to compliance. For starters, the company announced that it has acquired VulcanoSec, a German compliance and security firm. Chef actually acquired the company last summer, but is making the purchase official… Read More

Apr
01
2015
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Chef Launches Chef Delivery DevOps Workflow Service For The Enterprise

lego-chef Chef is mostly known as an IT automation service, but the company is branching out into continuous and unified delivery today with the launch of Chef Delivery. This new service provides enterprise devops teams with a new workflow for managing the continuous delivery of their infrastructure and run-time environments (including containers), as well as applications. Read More

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