Feb
24
2017
--

Quest for Better Replication in MySQL: Galera vs. Group Replication

Group Replication

Group ReplicationUPDATE: Some of the language in the original post was considered overly-critical of Oracle by some community members. This was not my intent, and I’ve modified the language to be less so. I’ve also changed term “synchronous” (which the use of is inaccurate and misleading) to “virtually synchronous.” This term is more accurate and already used by both technologies’ founders, and should be less misleading.

I also wanted to thank Jean-François Gagné for pointing out the incorrect sentence about multi-threaded slaves in Group Replication, which I also corrected accordingly.

In today’s blog post, I will briefly compare two major virtually synchronous replication technologies available today for MySQL.

More Than Asynchronous Replication

Thanks to the Galera plugin, founded by the Codership team, we’ve had the choice between asynchronous and virtually synchronous replication in the MySQL ecosystem for quite a few years already. Moreover, we can choose between at least three software providers: Codership, MariaDB and Percona, each with its own Galera implementation.

The situation recently became much more interesting when MySQL Group Replication went into GA (stable) stage in December 2016.

Oracle, the upstream MySQL provider, introduced its own replication implementation that is very similar in concept. Unlike the others mentioned above, it isn’t based on Galera. Group Replication was built from the ground up as a new solution. MySQL Group Replication shares many very similar concepts to Galera. This post doesn’t cover MySQL Cluster, another and fully-synchronous solution, that existed much earlier then Galera — it is a much different solution for different use cases.

In this post, I will point out a couple of interesting differences between Group Replication and Galera, which hopefully will be helpful to those considering switching from one to another (or if they are planning to test them).

This is certainly not a full list of all the differences, but rather things I found interesting during my explorations.

It is also important to know that Group Replication has evolved a lot before it went GA (its whole cluster layer was replaced). I won’t mention how things looked before the GA stage, and will just concentrate on latest available 5.7.17 version. I will not spend too much time on how Galera implementations looked in the past, and will use Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7 as a reference.

Multi-Master vs. Master-Slave

Galera has always been multi-master by default, so it does not matter to which node you write. Many users use a single writer due to workload specifics and multi-master limitations, but Galera has no single master mode per se.

Group Replication, on the other hand, promotes just one member as primary (master) by default, and other members are put into read-only mode automatically. This is what happens if we try to change data on non-master node:

mysql> truncate test.t1;
ERROR 1290 (HY000): The MySQL server is running with the --super-read-only option so it cannot execute this statement

To change from single primary mode to multi-primary (multi-master), you have to start group replication with the 

group_replication_single_primary_mode

variable disabled.
Another interesting fact is you do not have any influence on which cluster member will be the master in single primary mode: the cluster auto-elects it. You can only check it with a query:

mysql> SELECT * FROM performance_schema.global_status WHERE VARIABLE_NAME like 'group_replication%';
+----------------------------------+--------------------------------------+
| VARIABLE_NAME                    | VARIABLE_VALUE                       |
+----------------------------------+--------------------------------------+
| group_replication_primary_member | 329333cd-d6d9-11e6-bdd2-0242ac130002 |
+----------------------------------+--------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

Or just:

mysql> show status like 'group%';
+----------------------------------+--------------------------------------+
| Variable_name                    | Value                                |
+----------------------------------+--------------------------------------+
| group_replication_primary_member | 329333cd-d6d9-11e6-bdd2-0242ac130002 |
+----------------------------------+--------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

To show the hostname instead of UUID, here:

mysql> select member_host as "primary master" from performance_schema.global_status join performance_schema.replication_group_members where variable_name='group_replication_primary_member' and member_id=variable_value;
+----------------+
| primary master |
+----------------+
| f18ff539956d   |
+----------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

Replication: Majority vs. All

Galera delivers write transactions synchronously to ALL nodes in the cluster. (Later, applying happens asynchronously in both technologies.) However, Group Replication needs just a majority of the nodes confirming the transaction. This means a transaction commit on the writer succeeds and returns to the client even if a minority of nodes still have not received it.

In the example of a three-node cluster, if one node crashes or loses the network connection, the two others continue to accept writes (or just the primary node in Single-Primary mode) even before a faulty node is removed from the cluster.

If the separated node is the primary one, it denies writes due to the lack of a quorum (it will report the error

ERROR 3101 (HY000): Plugin instructed the server to rollback the current transaction.

). If one of the nodes receives a quorum, it will be elected to primary after the faulty node is removed from the cluster, and will then accept writes.

With that said, the “majority” rule in Group Replication means that there isn’t a guarantee that you won’t lose any data if the majority nodes are lost. There is a chance these could apply some transactions that aren’t delivered to the minority at the moment they crash.

In Galera, a single node network interruption makes the others wait for it, and pending writes can be committed once either the connection is restored or the faulty node removed from cluster after the timeout. So the chance of losing data in a similar scenario is lower, as transactions always reach all nodes. Data can be lost in Percona XtraDB Cluster only in a really bad luck scenario: a network split happens, the remaining majority of nodes form a quorum, the cluster reconfigures and allows new writes, and then shortly after the majority part is damaged.

Schema Requirements

For both technologies, one of the requirements is that all tables must be InnoDB and have a primary key. This requirement is now enforced by default in both Group Replication and Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7. Let’s look at the differences.

Percona XtraDB Cluster:

mysql> create table nopk (a char(10));
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.08 sec)
mysql> insert into nopk values ("aaa");
ERROR 1105 (HY000): Percona-XtraDB-Cluster prohibits use of DML command on a table (test.nopk) without an explicit primary key with pxc_strict_mode = ENFORCING or MASTER
mysql> create table m1 (id int primary key) engine=myisam;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.02 sec)
mysql> insert into m1 values(1);
ERROR 1105 (HY000): Percona-XtraDB-Cluster prohibits use of DML command on a table (test.m1) that resides in non-transactional storage engine with pxc_strict_mode = ENFORCING or MASTER
mysql> set global pxc_strict_mode=0;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
mysql> insert into nopk values ("aaa");
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)
mysql> insert into m1 values(1);
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

Before Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7 (or in other Galera implementations), there were no such enforced restrictions. Users unaware of these requirements often ended up with problems.

Group Replication:

mysql> create table nopk (a char(10));
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.04 sec)
mysql> insert into nopk values ("aaa");
ERROR 3098 (HY000): The table does not comply with the requirements by an external plugin.
2017-01-15T22:48:25.241119Z 139 [ERROR] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Table nopk does not have any PRIMARY KEY. This is not compatible with Group Replication'
mysql> create table m1 (id int primary key) engine=myisam;
ERROR 3161 (HY000): Storage engine MyISAM is disabled (Table creation is disallowed).

I am not aware of any way to disable these restrictions in Group Replication.

GTID

Galera has it’s own Global Transaction ID, which has existed since MySQL 5.5, and is independent from MySQL’s GTID feature introduced in MySQL 5.6. If MySQL’s GTID is enabled on a Galera-based cluster, both numerations exist with their own sequences and UUIDs.

Group Replication is based on a native MySQL GTID feature, and relies on it. Interestingly, a separate sequence block range (initially 1M) is pre-assigned for each cluster member.

WAN Support

The MySQL Group Replication documentation isn’t very optimistic on WAN support, claiming that both “Low latency, high bandwidth network connections are a requirement” and “Group Replication is designed to be deployed in a cluster environment where server instances are very close to each other, and is impacted by both network latency as well as network bandwidth.” These statements are found here and here. However there is network traffic optimization: Message Compression.

I don’t see group communication level tunings available yet, as we find in the Galera evs.* series of

wsrep_provider_options

.

Galera founders actually encourage trying it in geo-distributed environments, and some WAN-dedicated settings are available (the most important being WAN segments).

But both technologies need a reliable network for good performance.

State Transfers

Galera has two types of state transfers that allow syncing data to nodes when needed: incremental (IST) and full (SST). Incremental is used when a node has been out of a cluster for some time, and once it rejoins the other nodes has the missing write sets still in Galera cache. Full SST is helpful if incremental is not possible, especially when a new node is added to the cluster. SST automatically provisions the node with fresh data taken as a snapshot from one of the running nodes (donor). The most common SST method is using Percona XtraBackup, which takes a fast and non-blocking binary data snapshot (hot backup).

In Group Replication, state transfers are fully based on binary logs with GTID positions. If there is no donor with all of the binary logs (included the ones for new nodes), a DBA has to first provision the new node with initial data snapshot. Otherwise, the joiner will fail with a very familiar error:

2017-01-16T23:01:40.517372Z 50 [ERROR] Slave I/O for channel 'group_replication_recovery': Got fatal error 1236 from master when reading data from binary log: 'The slave is connecting using CHANGE MASTER TO MASTER_AUTO_POSITION = 1, but the master has purged binary logs containing GTIDs that the slave requires.', Error_code: 1236

The official documentation mentions that provisioning the node before adding it to the cluster may speed up joining (the recovery stage). Another difference is that in the case of state transfer failure, a Galera joiner will abort after the first try, and will shutdown its mysqld instance. The Group Replication joiner will then fall-back to another donor in an attempt to succeed. Here I found something slightly annoying: if no donor can satisfy joiner demands, it will still keep trying the same donors over and over, for a fixed number of attempts:

[root@cd81c1dadb18 /]# grep 'Attempt' /var/log/mysqld.log |tail
2017-01-16T22:57:38.329541Z 12 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Establishing group recovery connection with a possible donor. Attempt 1/10'
2017-01-16T22:57:38.539984Z 12 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Retrying group recovery connection with another donor. Attempt 2/10'
2017-01-16T22:57:38.806862Z 12 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Retrying group recovery connection with another donor. Attempt 3/10'
2017-01-16T22:58:39.024568Z 12 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Retrying group recovery connection with another donor. Attempt 4/10'
2017-01-16T22:58:39.249039Z 12 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Retrying group recovery connection with another donor. Attempt 5/10'
2017-01-16T22:59:39.503086Z 12 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Retrying group recovery connection with another donor. Attempt 6/10'
2017-01-16T22:59:39.736605Z 12 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Retrying group recovery connection with another donor. Attempt 7/10'
2017-01-16T23:00:39.981073Z 12 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Retrying group recovery connection with another donor. Attempt 8/10'
2017-01-16T23:00:40.176729Z 12 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Retrying group recovery connection with another donor. Attempt 9/10'
2017-01-16T23:01:40.404785Z 12 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Retrying group recovery connection with another donor. Attempt 10/10'

After the last try, even though it fails, mysqld keeps running and allows client connections…

Auto Increment Settings

Galera adjusts the auto_increment_increment and auto_increment_offset values according to the number of members in a cluster. So, for a 3-node cluster,

auto_increment_increment

  will be “3” and

auto_increment_offset

  from “1” to “3” (depending on the node). If a number of nodes change later, these are updated immediately. This feature can be disabled using the 

wsrep_auto_increment_control

 setting. If needed, these settings can be set manually.

Interestingly, in Group Replication the

auto_increment_increment

 seems to be fixed at 7, and only

auto_increment_offset

 is set differently on each node. This is the case even in the default Single-Primary mode! this seems like a waste of available IDs, so make sure that you adjust the

group_replication_auto_increment_increment

 setting to a saner number before you start using Group Replication in production.

Multi-Threaded Slave Side Applying

Galera developed its own multi-threaded slave feature, even in 5.5 versions, for workloads that include tables in the same database. It is controlled with the  wsrep_slave_threads variable. Group Replication uses a feature introduced in MySQL 5.7, where the number of applier threads is controlled with slave_parallel_workers. Galera will do multi-threaded replication based on potential conflicts of changed/locked rows. Group Replication parallelism is based on an improved LOGICAL_CLOCK scheduler, which uses information from writesets dependencies. This can allow it to achieve much better results than in normal asynchronous replication MTS mode. More details can be found here: http://mysqlhighavailability.com/zooming-in-on-group-replication-performance/

Flow Control

Both technologies use a technique to throttle writes when nodes are slow in applying them. Interestingly, the default size of the allowed applier queue in both is much different:

Moreover, Group Replication provides separate certifier queue size, also eligible for the Flow Control trigger:

 group_replication_flow_control_certifier_threshold

. One thing I found difficult, is checking the actual applier queue size, as the only exposed one via performance_schema.replication_group_member_stats is the

Count_Transactions_in_queue

 (which only shows the certifier queue).

Network Hiccup/Partition Handling

In Galera, when the network connection between nodes is lost, those who still have a quorum will form a new cluster view. Those who lost a quorum keep trying to re-connect to the primary component. Once the connection is restored, separated nodes will sync back using IST and rejoin the cluster automatically.

This doesn’t seem to be the case for Group Replication. Separated nodes that lose the quorum will be expelled from the cluster, and won’t join back automatically once the network connection is restored. In its error log we can see:

2017-01-17T11:12:18.562305Z 0 [ERROR] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Member was expelled from the group due to network failures, changing member status to ERROR.'
2017-01-17T11:12:18.631225Z 0 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'getstart group_id ce427319'
2017-01-17T11:12:21.735374Z 0 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'state 4330 action xa_terminate'
2017-01-17T11:12:21.735519Z 0 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'new state x_start'
2017-01-17T11:12:21.735527Z 0 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'state 4257 action xa_exit'
2017-01-17T11:12:21.735553Z 0 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'Exiting xcom thread'
2017-01-17T11:12:21.735558Z 0 [Note] Plugin group_replication reported: 'new state x_start'

Its status changes to:

mysql> SELECT * FROM performance_schema.replication_group_members;
+---------------------------+--------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+--------------+
| CHANNEL_NAME | MEMBER_ID | MEMBER_HOST | MEMBER_PORT | MEMBER_STATE |
+---------------------------+--------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+--------------+
| group_replication_applier | 329333cd-d6d9-11e6-bdd2-0242ac130002 | f18ff539956d | 3306 | ERROR |
+---------------------------+--------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+--------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

It seems the only way to bring it back into the cluster is to manually restart Group Replication:

mysql> START GROUP_REPLICATION;
ERROR 3093 (HY000): The START GROUP_REPLICATION command failed since the group is already running.
mysql> STOP GROUP_REPLICATION;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (5.00 sec)
mysql> START GROUP_REPLICATION;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (1.96 sec)
mysql> SELECT * FROM performance_schema.replication_group_members;
+---------------------------+--------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+--------------+
| CHANNEL_NAME | MEMBER_ID | MEMBER_HOST | MEMBER_PORT | MEMBER_STATE |
+---------------------------+--------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+--------------+
| group_replication_applier | 24d6ef6f-dc3f-11e6-abfa-0242ac130004 | cd81c1dadb18 | 3306 | ONLINE |
| group_replication_applier | 329333cd-d6d9-11e6-bdd2-0242ac130002 | f18ff539956d | 3306 | ONLINE |
| group_replication_applier | ae148d90-d6da-11e6-897e-0242ac130003 | 0af7a73f4d6b | 3306 | ONLINE |
+---------------------------+--------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+--------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec

Note that in the above output, after the network failure, Group Replication did not stop. It waits in an error state. Moreover, in Group Replication a partitioned node keeps serving dirty reads as if nothing happened (for non-super users):

cd81c1dadb18 {test} ((none)) > SELECT * FROM performance_schema.replication_group_members;
+---------------------------+--------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+--------------+
| CHANNEL_NAME | MEMBER_ID | MEMBER_HOST | MEMBER_PORT | MEMBER_STATE |
+---------------------------+--------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+--------------+
| group_replication_applier | 24d6ef6f-dc3f-11e6-abfa-0242ac130004 | cd81c1dadb18 | 3306 | ERROR |
+---------------------------+--------------------------------------+--------------+-------------+--------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
cd81c1dadb18 {test} ((none)) > select * from test1.t1;
+----+-------+
| id | a |
+----+-------+
| 1 | dasda |
| 3 | dasda |
+----+-------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)
cd81c1dadb18 {test} ((none)) > show grants;
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Grants for test@% |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, REPLICATION CLIENT ON *.* TO 'test'@'%' |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

A privileged user can disable

super_read_only

, but then it won’t be able to write:

cd81c1dadb18 {root} ((none)) > insert into test1.t1 set a="split brain";
ERROR 3100 (HY000): Error on observer while running replication hook 'before_commit'.
cd81c1dadb18 {root} ((none)) > select * from test1.t1;
+----+-------+
| id | a |
+----+-------+
| 1 | dasda |
| 3 | dasda |
+----+-------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

I found an interesting thing here, which I consider to be a bug. In this case, a partitioned node can actually perform DDL, despite the error:

cd81c1dadb18 {root} ((none)) > show tables in test1;
+-----------------+
| Tables_in_test1 |
+-----------------+
| nopk |
| t1 |
+-----------------+
2 rows in set (0.01 sec)
cd81c1dadb18 {root} ((none)) > create table test1.split_brain (id int primary key);
ERROR 3100 (HY000): Error on observer while running replication hook 'before_commit'.
cd81c1dadb18 {root} ((none)) > show tables in test1;
+-----------------+
| Tables_in_test1 |
+-----------------+
| nopk |
| split_brain |
| t1 |
+-----------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

In a Galera-based cluster, you are automatically protected from that, and a partitioned node refuses to allow both reads and writes. It throws an error: 

ERROR 1047 (08S01): WSREP has not yet prepared node for application use

. You can force dirty reads using the 

wsrep_dirty_reads

 variable.

There many more subtle (and less subtle) differences between these technologies – but this blog post is long enough already. Maybe next time ?

Article with Similar Subject

http://lefred.be/content/group-replication-vs-galera/

May
04
2016
--

MySQL High Availability: The Road Ahead for Percona and XtraDB Cluster

MySQL High Availability

MySQL High AvailabilityThis blog post discusses what is going on in the MySQL high availability market, and what Percona’s plans are for helping customers with high availability solutions.

One thing I like to tell people is that you shouldn’t view Percona as a “software” company, but as a “solution” company. Our goal has always been to provide the best solution that meets each customer’s situation, rather than push our own software, regardless of whether it is the best fit or not. As a result, we have customers running all kinds of MySQL “flavors”: MySQL, MariaDB, Percona Server, Amazon RDS and Google Cloud SQL. We’re happy to help customers be successful with the technology of their choice, and advise them on alternatives when we see a better fit.

One area where I have been increasingly uneasy is our advanced high availability support with Percona XtraDB Cluster and other Galera-based technologies. In 2011, when we started working on Percona XtraDB Cluster together with Codership, we needed to find a way to arrange investment into the development of Galera technology to bring it to market. So we made a deal, which, while providing needed development resources, also required us to price Percona XtraDB Cluster support as a very expensive add-on option. While this made sense at the time, it also meant few companies could afford XtraDB Cluster support from Percona, especially at large scale.

As a few years passed, the Galera technology became the mainstream high-end high availability option. In addition to being available in Percona XtraDB Cluster, it has been included in MariaDB, as well as Galera Cluster for MySQL. Additionally, the alternative technology to solve the same problem – MySQL Group Replication – started to be developed by the MySQL Team at Oracle. With these all changes, it was impossible for us to provide affordable support for Percona XtraDB Cluster due to our previous commercial agreement with Codership that reflected a very different market situation than we now find ourselves facing.

As a result, over a year ago we exited our support partnership agreement with Codership and moved the support and development function in-house. These changes have proven to be positive for our customers, allowing us to better focus on their priorities and provide better response time for issues, as these no longer require partner escalation.

Today we’re taking the next natural step – we will no longer require customers to purchase Percona XtraDB Cluster as a separate add-on. Percona will include support for XtraDB Cluster and other Galera-based replication technologies in our Enterprise and Premier support levels, as well as our Percona Care and Managed Services subscriptions. Furthermore, we are going to support Oracle’s MySQL Group Replication technology at no additional cost too, once it becomes generally available, so our customers have access to the best high availability technology for their deployment.

As part of this change, you will also see us focusing on hardening XtraDB Cluster and Galera technology, making it better suited for demanding business workloads, as well as more secure and easier to use. All of our changes will be available as 100% open source solutions and will also be contributed back to the Galera development team to incorporate into their code base if they wish.

I believe making the Galera code better is the most appropriate action for us at this point!

Feb
03
2015
--

Percona Live 2015 Lightning Talks, BoF submission deadline Feb. 13! And introducing “MySQL 101? program

It’s hard to believe that the Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo is just over two months away (April 13-16 in Santa Clara, California). So if you’ve been thinking about submitting a proposal for the popular “Lightning Talks” and/or “Birds of a Feather” sessions, it’s time to get moving because the deadline to do so if February 13.

Lightning Talks provide an opportunity for attendees to propose, explain, exhort, or rant on any MySQL-related topic for five minutes. Topics might include a new idea, successful project, cautionary story, quick tip, or demonstration. All submissions will be reviewed, and the top 10 will be selected to present during the one-hour Lightning Talks session on Wednesday (April 15) during the Community Networking Reception. Lighthearted, fun or otherwise entertaining submissions are highly welcome. Submit your proposal here.

"MySQL 101" is coming to Percona Live 2015

“MySQL 101″ is coming to Percona Live 2015.

Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions enable attendees with interests in the same project or topic to enjoy some quality face time. BoFs can be organized for individual projects or broader topics (e.g., best practices, open data, standards). Any attendee or conference speaker can propose and moderate an engaging BoF. Percona will post the selected topics and moderators online and provide a meeting space and time. The BoF sessions will be held Tuesday night, (April 14) from 6- 7 p.m. Submit your BoF proposal here.

This year we’re also adding a new program for MySQL “newbies.” It’s called “MySQL 101,” and the motto of this special two-day program is: “You send us developers and admins, and we will send you back MySQL DBAs.” The two days of practical training will include everything they need to know to handle day-to-day MySQL DBA tasks.

“MySQL 101,” which is not included in regular Percona Live registration, will cost $400. However, the first 101 tickets are just $101 if you use the promo code “101” during checkout.

New: 25-Minute Sessions
On the first day of the conference, Percona is now offering 25-minute talks that pack tons of great information into a shorter format to allow for a wider range of topics. The 25-minute sessions include:

Percona Live 2015 25-Minute Sessions

I also wanted to give another shout-out to Percona Live 2015’s awesome sponsor, which include: VMware, Yahoo, Deep Information Sciences, Pythian, Codership, Machine Zone, Box, Yelp, MariaDB, SpringbokSQL, Tesora, BlackMesh, SolidFire, Severalnines, Tokutek, VividCortex, FoundationDB, ScaleArc, Walmart eCommerce and more.(Sponsorship opportunities are still available.)

The great thing about Percona Live conferences is that there is something for everyone within the MySQL ecosystem – veterans and newcomers alike. And for the first time this year, that community expands to encompass OpenStack. Percona Live attendees can also attend OpenStack Live events. Those events run April 13-14, also at the Hyatt Regency Santa Clara and Santa Clara Convention Center.

OpenStack Live 2015’s awesome sponsors include: PMC Sierra and Nimble Storage!

With so much to offer this year, this is why there are several more options in terms of tickets. Click the image below for a detailed view of what access each ticket type provides.

Percona Live and OpenStack Live 2015 ticket access grid

Register here for the Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo.

Register here for the OpenStack Live Conference and Expo.

For full conference schedule details please visit the Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo website and the OpenStack Live Conference Website!

I hope to see you in Santa Clara in a couple months!

 

The post Percona Live 2015 Lightning Talks, BoF submission deadline Feb. 13! And introducing “MySQL 101″ program appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Jan
13
2015
--

Percona Live 2015 conference sessions announced!

Today we announced the full conference sessions schedule for April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2015 and this year’s event, once again at the Hyatt Regency Santa Clara and Santa Clara Convention Center, looks to be the biggest yet with networking and learning opportunities for MySQL professionals and enthusiasts at all levels.

Conference sessions will run April 14-16 following each morning’s keynote addresses (the keynotes have yet to be announced). The 2015 conference features a variety of formal tracks and sessions related to high availability, DevOps, programming, performance optimization, replication and backup. They’ll also cover MySQL in the cloud, MySQL and NoSQL, MySQL case studies, security (a very hot topic), and “what’s new” in MySQL.

The sessions will be delivered by top MySQL practitioners at some of the world’s leading MySQL vendors and users, including Oracle, Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, Twitter, Yelp, Percona and MariaDB.

Percona Live 2014 conference attendees Sessions will include:

  • “Better DevOps with MySQL and Docker,” Sunny Gleason, Founder, SunnyCloud
  • “Big Transactions on Galera Cluster,” Seppo Jaakola, CEO, Codership
  • “Database Defense in Depth,” Geoffrey Anderson, Database Operations Engineer, Box, Inc.
  • “The Database is Down, Now What?” Jeremy Tinley, Senior MySQL Operations Engineer, Etsy.com
  • “Encrypting MySQL data at Google,” Jeremy Cole, Sr. Systems Engineer, and Jonas Oreland, Software Developer, Google
  • “High-Availability using MySQL Fabric,” Mats Kindahl, Senior Principal Software Developer, MySQL Group, Oracle
  • “High Performance MySQL choices in Amazon Web Services: Beyond RDS,” Andrew Shieh, Director of Operations, SmugMug
  • “How to Analyze and Tune MySQL Queries for Better Performance,” Øystein Grøvlen, Senior Principal Software Engineer, Oracle
  • “InnoDB: A journey to the core III,” Davi Arnaut, Sr. Software Engineer, LinkedIn, and Jeremy Cole, Sr. Systems Engineer, Google, Inc.
  • “Meet MariaDB 10.1,” Sergei Golubchik, Chief Architect, MariaDB
  • “MySQL 5.7 Performance: Scalability & Benchmarks,” Dimitri Kravtchuk, MySQL Performance Architect, Oracle
  • “MySQL at Twitter – 2015,” Calvin Sun, Sr. Engineering Manager, and Inaam Rana, Staff Software Engineer, Twitter
  • “MySQL Automation at Facebook Scale,” Shlomo Priymak, MySQL Database Engineer, Facebook
  • “MySQL Cluster Performance Tuning – The 7.4.x Talk,” Johan Andersson CTO and Alex Yu, Vice President of Products, Severalnines AB
  • “MySQL for Facebook Messenger,” Domas Mituzas, Database Engineer, Facebook
  • “MySQL Indexing, How Does It Really Work?” Tim Callaghan, Vice President of Engineering, Tokutek
  • “MySQL in the Hosted Cloud,” Colin Charles, Chief Evangelist, MariaDB
  • “MySQL Security Essentials,” Ronald Bradford, Founder & CEO, EffectiveMySQL
  • “Scaling MySQL in Amazon Web Services,” Mark Filipi, MySQL Team Lead, Pythian
  • “Online schema changes for maximizing uptime,” David Turner, DBA, Dropbox, and Ben Black, DBA, Tango
  • “Upgrading to MySQL 5.6 @ scale,” Tom Krouper, Staff Database Administrator , Twitter

Of course Percona Live 2015 will also include several hours of hands-on, intensive tutorials – led by some of the top minds in MySQL. We had a post talking about the tutorials in more detail last month. Since then we added two more: “MySQL devops: initiation on how to automate MySQL deployment” and “Deploying MySQL HA with Ansible and Vagrant.” And of course Dimitri Vanoverbeke, Liz van Dijk and Kenny Gryp will once again this year host the ever-popular “Operational DBA in a Nutshell! Hands On Tutorial!

Yahoo, VMWare, Box and Yelp are among the industry leaders sponsoring the event, and additional sponsorship opportunities are still available.

Percona Live 2014 world mapWorldwide interest in Percona Live continues to soar, and this year, for the first time, the conference will run in parallel with OpenStack Live 2015, a new Percona conference scheduled for April 13 and 14. That event will be a unique opportunity for OpenStack users and enthusiasts to learn from leading OpenStack experts in the field about top cloud strategies, improving overall cloud performance, and operational best practices for managing and optimizing OpenStack and its MySQL database core.

Best of all, your full Percona Live ticket gives you access to the OpenStack Live conference! So why not save some $$? Early Bird registration discounts are available through Feb. 1, 2015 at 11:30 p.m. PST.

I hope to see you in April!

The post Percona Live 2015 conference sessions announced! appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Dec
04
2014
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Sneak peek at the Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2015

Sneak peek at the Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2015You know you’ll be there so why not save some $$ by registering now for the Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2015 (April 13-16 in Santa Clara, Calif.). Super Saver registration discounts are available through Dec. 14 at 11:30 p.m. PST. (That’s just 10 days away!)

What to expect this year? The Percona Live 2015 conference committee is putting together another fantastic event for the global MySQL community’s next meeting in April. The full conference agenda will be announced in January, but the initial roster includes:

  • Sunny Bains, Senior Engineering Manager at Oracle; “InnoDB 5.7- What’s New”
  • Yoshinori Matsunobu, Database Engineer at Facebook; “Fast Master Failover Without Data Loss”
  • Jeremy Cole, Senior Systems Engineer at Google, Inc.; “Exploring Your Data With InnoDB Explorer”
  • Tom Krouper, Staff Database Administrator at Twitter; “Upgrading to MySQL 5.6 @ Scale”
  • Jenni Snyder, Database Administrator at Yelp; “Schema changes multiple times a day? OK!”
  • Ike Walker, Database Architect at Flite; “Assembling the Perfect MySQL Toolbox”
  • Jean-François Gagné, Senior System Engineer/Architect at Booking.com; “Binlog Servers at Booking.com”
  • Jeremy Glick, Lead DBA at MyDBAteam, and Andrew Moore, MySQL DBA at Percona; “Using MySQL Audit Plugins and Elasticsearch ELK”
  • Tomáš Komenda, Team Lead and Database Specialist, and Lukáš Putna, Senior Developer and Database Specialist at Seznam.cz; “MySQL and HBase Ecosystem for Real-time Big Data Overviews”
  • Alexander Rubin, Principal Consultant at Percona; “Advanced MySQL Query Tuning”

And while the call for papers deadline has expired, there are still sponsorship opportunities available for the world’s largest annual MySQL event. Sponsors become a part of a dynamic and growing ecosystem and interact with more than 1,000 DBAs, sysadmins, developers, CTOs, CEOs, business managers, technology evangelists, solutions vendors, and entrepreneurs who attend the event.

Current sponsors include:

  • Diamond Plus: VMware
  • Gold: Codership, Pythian
  • Silver: Box, SpringbokSQL, Yelp
  • Exhibit Only: FoundationDB, Severalnines, Tokutek, VividCortex
  • Other Sponsors: MailChimp
  • Media Sponsor: Database Trends & Applications , Datanami, InfoQ , Linux Journal, O’Reilly Media

Sneak peek at the Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2015Percona Live 2015 will feature a variety of formal tracks and sessions related to High Availability, DevOps, Programming, Performance Optimization, Replication and Backup, MySQL in the Cloud, MySQL and NoSQL, MySQL Case Studies, Security, and What’s New in MySQL.

As usual the conference will be held in the heart of Silicon Valley at the Hyatt Regency Santa Clara and Santa Clara Convention Center. But this year Percona has also unveiled OpenStack Live 2015, a new conference that will run in parallel with Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2015 on April 13 and 14.

And don’t forget, Super Saver registration discounts are available through Dec. 14 at 11:30 p.m. PST. I hope to see you in Santa Clara!

The post Sneak peek at the Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2015 appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Nov
13
2014
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Percona Live London 2014 Wrap Up

Percona Live London 2014 SummaryThe 2014 edition of Percona Live London brought together attendees from 30 countries to hear insightful talks from leaders in the MySQL community. The conference kicked off on Monday with a full day of tutorials followed by the very popular Community Dinner featuring a double decker bus shuttle from the conference to the event.

Tuesday started with keynote talks by representatives from MySQL, VMware, HGST, Codership, and Percona. I particularly enjoyed the talks by Tomas Ulin of MySQL (which highlighted the upcoming MySQL 5.7 release) and Robert Hodges of VMware (which focused on the evolution of MySQL). The remainder of the day was filled by six time slots of breakout sessions (30 sessions in all) broken into 10 tracks. The day wrapped up with the always popular Community Networking Reception. Attesting to the quality of the conference, 4 out of 5 respondents to our post conference survey indicate they are likely to attend the conference again in 2015.

The session slides are available by visiting the Percona Live London 2014 conference website (look for the “Session Slides” button in the right hand column). Slides are added as they come in from the speakers so please check back if the slides are not yet available for a specific talk that interests you.

Special thanks goes out to the Percona Live London 2014 Conference Committee which put together such a great program:

  • Cedric Peintre of Dailymotion
  • David Busby of Percona
  • Colin Charles of MariaDB
  • Luis Motta Campos of the ebay Classified Group
  • Nicolai Plum of Booking.com
  • Morgan Tocker of Oracle
  • Art van Scheppingen of Spil Games

Percona Live London 2014 Attendee Survey

Percona Live London 2014 Attendee SurveyThis year we collaborated with ComputerworldUK to run a short survey at the conference which should appear in that publication in the near future. We had 64 responses, all of them being form MySQL professionals who attended the conference. The results were interesting:

Do you agree with the statement that “Oracle has been a good steward of MySQL over the past twelve months”?
YES = 81%
NO = 19%

Are you currently running a production OpenStack environment in your organization?
YES = 17%
NO = 83%

Have you evaluated OpenStack within the past twelve months?
YES = 25%
NO = 75%

Do you plan to evaluate OpenStack in the next twelve months?
YES = 48%
NO = 52%

Are you currently using an AWS product to run MySQL in the Cloud?
YES = 28%
NO = 72%

Are you more likely to switch to a non-MySQL open source database now than you were twelve months ago?
YES = 35%
NO = 65%

The sentiment about Oracle’s stewardship of MySQL compares favorably with the comments by our own Peter Zaitsev in a recent ZDNet article titled “MySQL: Why the open source database is better off under Oracle“.

Percona Live MySQL Conference and OpenStack Live Conference

Percona Live London 2014The ratings related to OpenStack mirror our experience with the strong growth in interest in that technology. In response, we are launching the inaugural OpenStack Live 2015 conference in Silicon Valley which will focus on making attendees more successful with OpenStack with a particular emphasis on the role of MySQL and Trove. The event will be April 13-14, 2015 at the Santa Clara Convention Center. The call for proposals closes on November 16, 2014.

Our next Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo is April 13-16, 2015 in Silicon Valley. Join us for the largest MySQL conference in the world – last year’s event had over 1,100 registered attendees from 40 countries who enjoyed a full four days of tutorials, keynotes, breakout sessions, networking events, BOFs, and more. The call for speaking proposals closes November 16, 2014 and Early Bird registration rates are still available so check out the conference website now for full details.

Thanks to everyone who helped make Percona Live London 2014 a great success. I look forward to the Percona Live MySQL Conference and the OpenStack Live Conference next April in Silicon Valley!

The post Percona Live London 2014 Wrap Up appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Sep
15
2014
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Percona Live London: Top Ten reasons to attend Nov. 3-4

Percona Live London 2014Percona Live London 2014 is fast approaching – November is just around the corner. This year’s conference, November 3-4, will be even bigger and better than last year thanks to the participation of leading MySQL experts the world over (including you!).

The Percona Live London MySQL Conference is a great event for users of any level using any of the major MySQL branches: MySQL, MariaDB or Percona Server. And this year we once again host a star-studded group of keynote speakers from industry-leading companies in the MySQL space.

We’ll also be welcoming leading MySQL practitioners from across the industry (and from all corners of the world) who will speak on topics that matter to you now  – see the full conference schedule here:

Monday starts early with a full day of tutorials and a fun evening at the community dinner.  Attendees will be arriving in true London style on a double-decker bus! Tuesday morning will kick-off with a series of keynotes followed by interactive breakout sessions – wrapping things up at the end of the day with a fun post-conference reception (a great chance to make new friends and reconnect with old ones).

Here’s a sneak peek at some of the must-see events this year:

To recap, here are the Top Ten reasons to attend Percona Live London this November 3-4:

10. Advanced Rate Pricing ends October 5th
9. Hear about the hottest current topics and trends.
8. Network! Meet face-to-face in the “hallway track” and make lasting connections.
7. Learn how to make MySQL work better for you – regardless of your expertise.
6. Have a blast at the community dinner!
5. Discuss your unique challenges with experts and discover options for solving them.
4. Engage with the sponsors at their tabletop exhibits.
3. Listen to top industry leaders describe the future of the MySQL ecosystem
2. Learn what works, and what doesn’t, from leading companies using MySQL
1. And the Number 1 reason to attend Percona Live London 2014: ALL of the above!

I look forward to seeing you in London this November and don’t forgot that Advanced Rate Pricing pricing ends October 5 so be sure to register now!

The post Percona Live London: Top Ten reasons to attend Nov. 3-4 appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Jan
15
2014
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Upcoming Webinar: What’s new in Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6I’ve been blogging a lot about some of the new things you can expect with Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6 and Galera 3.x – and GA is coming soon.

To get prepared, I’ll be giving a webinar on February 5th at 1PM EST/10AM PST to talk about some of the big new features, upgrading strategies, as well as answering your questions. Alexey Yurchenko, solutions architect from Codership, will be joining me for some extra brain power.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Galera 3 replication enhancements
  • WAN segments
  • Cluster integration with 5.6 Async replication GTIDs
  • Async to cluster inbound replication enhancements
  • Minimal replication images
  • Detecting Donor IST viability
  • Upgrade paths to Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6

You can register for free right here!

The post Upcoming Webinar: What’s new in Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6 appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

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