Mar
25
2019
--

Percona Server for MongoDB Operator 0.3.0 Early Access Release Is Now Available

Percona Server for MongoDB

Percona Server for MongoDB OperatorPercona announces the availability of the Percona Server for MongoDB Operator 0.3.0 early access release.

The Percona Server for MongoDB Operator simplifies the deployment and management of Percona Server for MongoDB in a Kubernetes or OpenShift environment. It extends the Kubernetes API with a new custom resource for deploying, configuring and managing the application through the whole life cycle.

You can install the Percona Server for MongoDB Operator on Kubernetes or OpenShift. While the operator does not support all the Percona Server for MongoDB features in this early access release, instructions on how to install and configure it are already available along with the operator source code in our Github repository.

The Percona Server for MongoDB Operator is an early access release. Percona doesn’t recommend it for production environments.

New Features

Improvements

Fixed Bugs

  • CLOUD-141: Operator failed to rescale cluster after self-healing.
  • CLOUD-151: Dashboard upgrade in Percona Monitoring and Management caused loop due to no write access.
  • CLOUD-152: Percona Server for MongoDB crash took place in case of no backup section in the Operator configuration file.
  • CLOUD-91: The Operator was throwing error messages with Arbiters disabled in the deploy/cr.yaml configuration file.

Percona Server for MongoDB is an enhanced, open source and highly-scalable database that is a fully-compatible, drop-in replacement for MongoDB Community Edition. It supports MongoDB® protocols and drivers. Percona Server for MongoDB extends MongoDB Community Edition functionality by including the Percona Memory Engine, as well as several enterprise-grade features. It requires no changes to MongoDB applications or code.

Help us improve our software quality by reporting any bugs you encounter using our bug tracking system.
Feb
21
2019
--

Percona Server for MongoDB Operator 0.2.1 Early Access Release Is Now Available

Percona Server for MongoDB

Percona Server for MongoDB OperatorPercona announces the availability of the Percona Server for MongoDB Operator 0.2.1 early access release.

The Percona Server for MongoDB Operator simplifies the deployment and management of Percona Server for MongoDB in a Kubernetes or OpenShift environment. It extends the Kubernetes API with a new custom resource for deploying, configuring and managing the application through the whole life cycle.

Note: PerconaLabs is one of the open source GitHub repositories for unofficial scripts and tools created by Percona staff. These handy utilities can help save your time and effort.

Percona software builds located in the Percona-Lab repository are not officially released software, and also aren’t covered by Percona support or services agreements.

You can install the Percona Server for MongoDB Operator on Kubernetes or OpenShift. While the operator does not support all the Percona Server for MongoDB features in this early access release, instructions on how to install and configure it are already available along with the operator source code in our Github repository.

The Percona Server for MongoDB Operator on Percona-Lab is an early access release. Percona doesn’t recommend it for production environments.

Improvements

  • Backups to S3 compatible storages
  • CLOUD-117: An error proof functionality was included into this release. It doesn’t allow unsafe configurations by default, preventing user from configuring a cluster with more than one Arbiter node or a Replica Set with less than three nodes.
    • For those who still need such configurations, this protection can be disabled by setting allowUnsafeConfigurations=true in the deploy/cr.yaml file.

Fixed Bugs

  • CLOUD-105: The Service-per-Pod feature used with the LoadBalancer didn’t work with cluster sizes not equal to 1.
  • CLOUD-137: PVC assigned to the Arbiter Pod had the same size as PVC of the regular Percona Server for MongoDB Pods, despite the fact that Arbiter doesn’t store data.

Percona Server for MongoDB is an enhanced, open source and highly-scalable database that is a fully-compatible, drop-in replacement for MongoDB Community Edition. It supports MongoDB protocols and drivers. Percona Server for MongoDB extends MongoDB Community Edition functionality by including the Percona Memory Engine, as well as several enterprise-grade features. It requires no changes to MongoDB applications or code.

Help us improve our software quality by reporting any bugs you encounter using our bug tracking system.
Feb
20
2019
--

Google’s hybrid cloud platform is now in beta

Last July, at its Cloud Next conference, Google announced the Cloud Services Platform, its first real foray into bringing its own cloud services into the enterprise data center as a managed service. Today, the Cloud Services Platform (CSP) is launching into beta.

It’s important to note that the CSP isn’t — at least for the time being — Google’s way of bringing all of its cloud-based developer services to the on-premises data center. In other words, this is a very different project from something like Microsoft’s Azure Stack. Instead, the focus is on the Google Kubernetes Engine, which allows enterprises to then run their applications in both their own data centers and on virtually any cloud platform that supports containers.As Google Cloud engineering director Chen Goldberg told me, the idea here it to help enterprises innovate and modernize. “Clearly, everybody is very excited about cloud computing, on-demand compute and managed services, but customers have recognized that the move is not that easy,” she said and noted that the vast majority of enterprises are adopting a hybrid approach. And while containers are obviously still a very new technology, she feels good about this bet on the technology because most enterprises are already adopting containers and Kubernetes — and they are doing so at exactly the same time as they are adopting cloud and especially hybrid clouds.

It’s important to note that CSP is a managed platform. Google handles all of the heavy lifting like upgrades and security patches. And for enterprises that need an easy way to install some of the most popular applications, the platform also supports Kubernetes applications from the GCP Marketplace.

As for the tech itself, Goldberg stressed that this isn’t just about Kubernetes. The service also uses Istio, for example, the increasingly popular service mesh that makes it easier for enterprises to secure and control the flow of traffic and API calls between its applications.

With today’s release, Google is also launching its new CSP Config Management tool to help users create multi-cluster policies and set up and enforce access controls, resource quotas and more. CSP also integrates with Google’s Stackdriver Monitoring service and continuous delivery platforms.

“On-prem is not easy,” Goldberg said, and given that this is the first time the company is really supporting software in a data center that is not its own, that’s probably an understatement. But Google also decided that it didn’t want to force users into a specific set of hardware specifications like Azure Stack does, for example. Instead, CSP sits on top of VMware’s vSphere server virtualization platform, which most enterprises already use in their data centers anyway. That surely simplifies things, given that this is a very well-understood platform.

Jan
28
2019
--

Percona Server for MongoDB Operator 0.2.0 Early Access Release Is Now Available

Percona Server for MongoDB Operator

Percona Server for MongoDB OperatorPercona announces the availability of the Percona Server for MongoDB Operator 0.2.0 early access release.

The Percona Server for MongoDB Operator simplifies the deployment and management of Percona Server for MongoDB in a Kubernetes or OpenShift environment. It extends the Kubernetes API with a new custom resource for deploying, configuring and managing the application through the whole life cycle.

Note: PerconaLabs is one of the open source GitHub repositories for unofficial scripts and tools created by Percona staff. These handy utilities can help save your time and effort.

Percona software builds located in the Percona-Lab repository are not officially released software, and also aren’t covered by Percona support or services agreements.

You can install the Percona Server for MongoDB Operator on Kubernetes or OpenShift. While the operator does not support all the Percona Server for MongoDB features in this early access release, instructions on how to install and configure it are already available along with the operator source code in our Github repository.

The Percona Server for MongoDB Operator on Percona-Lab is an early access release. Percona doesn’t recommend it for production environments. 

New features

  • Percona Server for MongoDB backups are now supported and can be performed on a schedule or on demand.
  • Percona Server for MongoDB Operator now supports Replica Set Arbiter nodes to reduce disk IO and occupied space if needed.
  • Service per Pod operation mode implemented in this version allows assigning external or internal static IP addresses to the Replica Set nodes.

Improvements

  • CLOUD-76: Several Percona Server for MongoDB clusters can now share one namespace.

Fixed Bugs

  • CLOUD-97: The Replica Set watcher was not stopped automatically after the custom resource deletion.
  • CLOUD-46: When k8s-mongodb-initiator was running on an already-initialized Replica Set, it still attempted to initiate it.
  • CLOUD-45: The operator was temporarily removing MongoDB nodes from the Replica Set during a Pod update without the need.
  • CLOUD-51: It was not possible to set requests without limits in the custom resource configuration.
  • CLOUD-52: It was not possible to set limits without requests in the custom resource configuration.
  • CLOUD-89: The k8s-mongodb-initiator  was exiting with exit-code 1 instead of 0 if the Replica Set initiation has already happened, e.g., when a custom resource was deleted and recreated without deleting PVC data.
  • CLOUD-96: The operator was crashing after a re-create of the custom resource that already had old PVC data, and caused it to skip Replica Set init.

Percona Server for MongoDB is an enhanced, open source and highly-scalable database that is a fully-compatible, drop-in replacement for MongoDB Community Edition. It supports MongoDB protocols and drivers. Percona Server for MongoDB extends MongoDB Community Edition functionality by including the Percona Memory Engine, as well as several enterprise-grade features. It requires no changes to MongoDB applications or code.

Help us improve our software quality by reporting any bugs you encounter using our bug tracking system.
Dec
20
2018
--

Percona Database Performance Blog 2018 Year in Review: Top Blog Posts

Percona Database Performance Blog

Percona Database Performance BlogLet’s look at some of the most popular Percona Database Performance Blog posts in 2018.

The closing of a year lends itself to looking back. And making lists. With the Percona Database Performance Blog, Percona staff and leadership work hard to provide the open source community with insights, technical support, predictions and metrics around multiple open source database software technologies. We’ve had nearly 4 million visits to the blog in 2018: thank you! We look forward to providing you with even better articles, news and information in 2019.

As 2018 moves into 2019, let’s take a quick look back at some of the most popular posts on the blog this year.

Top 10 Most Read

These posts had the most number of views (working down from the highest):

When Should I Use Amazon Aurora and When Should I use RDS MySQL?

Now that Database-as-a-service (DBaaS) is in high demand, there is one question regarding AWS services that cannot always be answered easily : When should I use Aurora and when RDS MySQL?

About ZFS Performance

ZFS has many very interesting features, but I am a bit tired of hearing negative statements on ZFS performance. It feels a bit like people are telling me “Why do you use InnoDB? I have read that MyISAM is faster.” I found the comparison of InnoDB vs. MyISAM quite interesting, and I’ll use it in this post.

Linux OS Tuning for MySQL Database Performance

In this post we will review the most important Linux settings to adjust for performance tuning and optimization of a MySQL database server. We’ll note how some of the Linux parameter settings used OS tuning may vary according to different system types: physical, virtual or cloud.

A Look at MyRocks Performance

As the MyRocks storage engine (based on the RocksDB key-value store http://rocksdb.org ) is now available as part of Percona Server for MySQL 5.7, I wanted to take a look at how it performs on a relatively high-end server and SSD storage.

How to Restore MySQL Logical Backup at Maximum Speed

The ability to restore MySQL logical backups is a significant part of disaster recovery procedures. It’s a last line of defense.

Why MySQL Stored Procedures, Functions and Triggers Are Bad For Performance

MySQL stored procedures, functions and triggers are tempting constructs for application developers. However, as I discovered, there can be an impact on database performance when using MySQL stored routines. Not being entirely sure of what I was seeing during a customer visit, I set out to create some simple tests to measure the impact of triggers on database performance. The outcome might surprise you.

AMD EPYC Performance Testing… or Don’t get on the wrong side of SystemD

Ever since AMD released their EPYC CPU for servers I wanted to test it, but I did not have the opportunity until recently, when Packet.net started offering bare metal servers for a reasonable price. So I started a couple of instances to test Percona Server for MySQL under this CPU. In this benchmark, I discovered some interesting discrepancies in performance between  AMD and Intel CPUs when running under systemd.

Tuning PostgreSQL Database Parameters to Optimize Performance

Out of the box, the default PostgreSQL configuration is not tuned for any particular workload. Default values are set to ensure that PostgreSQL runs everywhere, with the least resources it can consume and so that it doesn’t cause any vulnerabilities. It is primarily the responsibility of the database administrator or developer to tune PostgreSQL according to their system’s workload. In this blog, we will establish basic guidelines for setting PostgreSQL database parameters to improve database performance according to workload.

Using AWS EC2 instance store vs EBS for MySQL: how to increase performance and decrease cost

If you are using large EBS GP2 volumes for MySQL (i.e. 10TB+) on AWS EC2, you can increase performance and save a significant amount of money by moving to local SSD (NVMe) instance storage. Interested? Then read on for a more detailed examination of how to achieve cost-benefits and increase performance from this implementation.

Why You Should Avoid Using “CREATE TABLE AS SELECT” Statement

In this blog post, I’ll provide an explanation why you should avoid using the CREATE TABLE AS SELECT statement. The SQL statement “create table <table_name> as select …” is used to create a normal or temporary table and materialize the result of the select. Some applications use this construct to create a copy of the table. This is one statement that will do all the work, so you do not need to create a table structure or use another statement to copy the structure.

Honorable Mention:

Is Serverless Just a New Word for Cloud-Based?

Top 10 Most Commented

These posts generated some healthy discussions (not surprisingly, this list overlaps with the first):

Posts Worth Revisiting

Don’t miss these great posts that have excellent information on important topics:

Have a great end of the year celebration, and we look forward to providing more great blog posts in 2019.

Dec
04
2018
--

Microsoft and Docker team up to make packaging and running cloud-native applications easier

Microsoft and Docker today announced a new joint open-source project, the Cloud Native Application Bundle (CNAB), that aims to make the lifecycle management of cloud-native applications easier. At its core, the CNAB is nothing but a specification that allows developers to declare how an application should be packaged and run. With this, developers can define their resources and then deploy the application to anything from their local workstation to public clouds.

The specification was born inside Microsoft, but as the team talked to Docker, it turns out that the engineers there were working on a similar project. The two decided to combine forces and launch the result as a single open-source project. “About a year ago, we realized we’re both working on the same thing,” Microsoft’s Gabe Monroy told me. “We decided to combine forces and bring it together as an industry standard.”

As part of this, Microsoft is launching its own reference implementation of a CNAB client today. Duffle, as it’s called, allows users to perform all the usual lifecycle steps (install, upgrade, uninstall), create new CNAB bundles and sign them cryptographically. Docker is working on integrating CNAB into its own tools, too.

Microsoft also today launched Visual Studio extension for building and hosting these bundles, as well as an example implementation of a bundle repository server and an Electron installer that lets you install a bundle with the help of a GUI.

Now it’s worth noting that we’re talking about a specification and reference implementations here. There is obviously a huge ecosystem of lifecycle management tools on the market today that all have their own strengths and weaknesses. “We’re not going to be able to unify that tooling,” said Monroy. “I don’t think that’s a feasible goal. But what we can do is we can unify the model around it, specifically the lifecycle management experience as well as the packaging and distribution experience. That’s effectively what Docker has been able to do with the single-workload case.”

Over time, Microsoft and Docker would like for the specification to end up in a vendor-neutral foundation. Which one remains to be seen, though the Open Container Initiative seems like the natural home for a project like this.

Dec
03
2018
--

Percona Live 2019 Call for Papers is Now Open!

Percona Live CFP 2019

Percona Live 2019Announcing the opening of the Percona Live 2019 Open Source Database Conference call for papers. It will be open from now until January 20, 2019. The Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2019 takes place May 28-30 in Austin, Texas.

Our theme this year is CONNECT. ACCELERATE. INNOVATE.

As a speaker at Percona Live, you’ll have the opportunity to CONNECT with your peers—open source database experts and enthusiasts who share your commitment to improving knowledge and exchanging ideas. ACCELERATE your projects and career by presenting at the premier open source database event, a great way to build your personal and company brands. And influence the evolution of the open source software movement by demonstrating how you INNOVATE!

Community initiatives remain core to the open source ethos, and we are proud of the contribution we make with Percona Live in showcasing thought leading practices in the open source database world.

With a nod to innovation, this year we are introducing a business track to benefit those business leaders who are exploring the use of open source and are interested in learning more about its costs and benefits.

Speaking Opportunities

The Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2019 Call for Papers is open until January 20, 2019. We invite you to submit your speaking proposal for breakout, tutorial or lightning talk sessions. Classes and talks are invited for Foundation (either entry-level or of general interest to all), Core (intermediate), and Masterclass (advanced) levels.

  • Breakout Session. Broadly cover a technology area using specific examples. Sessions should be either 25 minutes or 50 minutes in length (including Q&A).
  • Tutorial Session. Present a technical session that aims for a level between a training class and a conference breakout session. We encourage attendees to bring and use laptops for working on detailed and hands-on presentations. Tutorials will be three or six hours in length (including Q&A).
  • Lightning Talk. Give a five-minute presentation focusing on one key point that interests the open source community: technical, lighthearted or entertaining talks on new ideas, a successful project, a cautionary story, a quick tip or demonstration.

If your proposal is selected for breakout or tutorial sessions, you will receive a complimentary full conference pass.

Topics and Themes

We want proposals that cover the many aspects of application development using all open source databases, as well as new and interesting ways to monitor and manage database environments. Did you just embrace open source databases this year? What are the technical and business values of moving to or using open source databases? How did you convince your company to make the move? Was there tangible ROI?

Best practices and current trends, including design, application development, performance optimization, HA and clustering, cloud, containers and new technologies –  what’s holding your focus? Share your case studies, experiences and technical knowledge with an engaged audience of open source peers.

In the submission entry, indicate which of these themes your proposal best fits: tutorial, business needs; case studies/use cases; operations; or development. Also include which track(s) from the list below would be best suited to your talk.

Tracks

The conference committee is looking for proposals that cover the many aspects of using, deploying and managing open source databases, including:

  • MySQL. Do you have an opinion on what is new and exciting in MySQL? With the release of MySQL 8.0, are you using the latest features? How and why? Are they helping you solve any business issues, or making deployment of applications and websites easier, faster or more efficient? Did the new release influence you to change to MySQL? What do you see as the biggest impact of the MySQL 8.0 release? Do you use MySQL in conjunction with other databases in your environment?
  • MariaDB. Talks highlighting MariaDB and MariaDB compatible databases and related tools. Discuss the latest features, how to optimize performance, and demonstrate the best practices you’ve adopted from real production use cases and applications.
  • PostgreSQL. Why do you use PostgreSQL as opposed to other SQL options? Have you done a comparison or benchmark of PostgreSQL vs. other types of databases related to your applications? Why, and what were the results? How does PostgreSQL help you with application performance or deployment? How do you use PostgreSQL in conjunction with other databases in your environment?
  • MongoDB. Has the 4.0 release improved your experience in application development or time-to-market? How are the new features making your database environment better? What is it about MongoDB 4.0 that excites you? What are your experiences with Atlas? Have you moved to it, and has it lived up to its promises? Do you use MongoDB in conjunction with other databases in your environment?
  • Polyglot Persistence. How are you using multiple open source databases together? What tools and technologies are helping you to get them interacting efficiently? In what ways are multiple databases working together helping to solve critical business issues? What are the best practices you’ve discovered in your production environments?
  • Observability and Monitoring. How are you designing your database-powered applications for observability? What monitoring tools and methods are providing you with the best application and database insights for running your business? How are you using tools to troubleshoot issues and bottlenecks? How are you observing your production environment in order to understand the critical aspects of your deployments? 
  • Kubernetes. How are you running open source databases on the Kubernetes, OpenShift and other container platforms? What software are you using to facilitate their use? What best practices and processes are making containers a vital part of your business strategy? 
  • Automation and AI. How are you using automation to run databases at scale? Are you using automation to create self-running, self-healing, and self-tuning databases? Is machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) helping you create a new generation of database automation?
  • Migration to Open Source Databases. How are you migrating to open source databases? Are you migrating on-premises or to the cloud? What are the tools and strategies you’ve used that have been successful, and what have you learned during and after the migration? Do you have real-world migration stories that illustrate how best to migrate?
  • Database Security and Compliance. All of us have experienced security and compliance challenges. From new legislation like GDPR, PCI and HIPAA, exploited software bugs, or new threats such as ransomware attacks, when is enough “enough”? What are your best practices for preventing incursions? How do you maintain compliance as you move to the cloud? Are you finding that security and compliance requirements are preventing your ability to be agile?
  • Other Open Source Databases. There are many, many great open source database software and solutions we can learn about. Submit other open source database talk ideas – we welcome talks for both established database technologies as well as the emerging new ones that no one has yet heard about (but should).
  • Business and Enterprise. Has your company seen big improvements in ROI from using Open Source Databases? Are there efficiency levels or interesting case studies you want to share? How did you convince your company to move to Open Source?

How to Respond to the Call for Papers

For information on how to submit your proposal, visit our call for papers page.

Sponsorship

If you would like to obtain a sponsor pack for Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2019, you will find more information including a prospectus on our sponsorship page. You are welcome to contact me, Bronwyn Campbell, directly.

Nov
06
2018
--

VMware acquires Heptio, the startup founded by 2 co-founders of Kubernetes

During its big customer event in Europe, VMware announced another acquisition to step up its game in helping enterprises build and run containerised, Kubernetes-based architectures: it has acquired Heptio, a startup out of Seattle that was co-founded by Joe Beda and Craig McLuckie, who were two of the three people who co-created Kubernetes back at Google in 2014 (it has since been open sourced).

Beda and McLuckie and their team will all be joining VMware in the transaction.

Terms of the deal are not being disclosed — VMware said in a release that they are not material to the company — but as a point of reference, when Heptio last raised money — a $25 million Series B in 2017, with investors including Lightspeed, Accel and Madrona — it was valued at $117 million post-money, according to data from PitchBook.

Given the pedigree of Heptio’s founders, this is a signal of the big bet that VMware is taking on Kubernetes, and the belief that it will become an increasing cornerstone in how enterprises run their businesses. The larger company already works with 500,000+ customers globally, and 75,000 partners. It’s not clear how many customers Heptio worked with but they included large, tech-forward businesses like Yahoo Japan.

It’s also another endorsement of the ongoing rise of open source and its role in cloud architectures, a paradigm that got its biggest boost at the end of October with IBM’s acquisition of RedHat, one of the biggest tech acquisitions of all time at $34 billion.

Heptio provides professional services for enterprises that are adopting or already use Kubernetes, providing training, support and building open-source projects for managing specific aspects of Kubernetes and related container clusters, and this deal is about VMware expanding the business funnel and margins for Kubernetes within it its wider cloud, on-premise and hybrid storage and computing services with that expertise.

“Kubernetes is emerging as an open framework for multi-cloud infrastructure that enables enterprise organizations to run modern applications,” said Paul Fazzone, senior vice president and general manager, Cloud Native Apps Business Unit, VMware, in a statement. “Heptio products and services will reinforce and extend VMware’s efforts with PKS to establish Kubernetes as the de facto standard for infrastructure across clouds upon closing. We are thrilled that the Heptio team led by Craig and Joe will be joining VMware to help us guide customers as they move to a multi-cloud world.”

VMware and its Pivotal business already offer Kubernetes-related services by way of PKS, which lets organizations run cloud-agnostic apps. Heptio will become a part of that wider portfolio.

“The team at Heptio has been focused on Kubernetes, creating products that make it easier to manage multiple clusters across multiple clouds,” said Craig McLuckie, CEO and co-founder of Heptio. “And now we will be tapping into VMware’s cloud native resources and proven ability to execute, amplifying our impact. VMware’s interest in Heptio is a recognition that there is so much innovation happening in open source. We are jointly committed to contribute even more to the community—resources, ideas and support.”

VMware has made some 33 acquisitions overall, according to Crunchbase, but this appears to have been the first specifically to boost its position in Kubernetes.

The deal is expected to close by fiscal Q4 2019, VMware said.

Oct
11
2018
--

New Relic acquires Belgium’s CoScale to expand its monitoring of Kubernetes containers and microservices

New Relic, a provider of analytics and monitoring around a company’s internal and external facing apps and services to help optimise their performance, is making an acquisition today as it continues to expand a newer area of its business, containers and microservices. The company has announced that it has purchased CoScale, a provider of monitoring for containers and microservices, with a specific focus on Kubernetes.

Terms of the deal — which will include the team and technology — are not being disclosed, as it will not have a material impact on New Relic’s earnings. The larger company is traded on the NYSE (ticker: NEWR) and has been a strong upswing in the last two years, and its current market cap its around $4.6 billion.

Originally founded in Belgium, CoScale had raised $6.4 million and was last valued at $7.9 million, according to PitchBook. Investors included Microsoft (via its ScaleUp accelerator), PMV and the Qbic Fund, two Belgian investors.

We are thrilled to bring CoScale’s knowledge and deeply technical team into the New Relic fold,” noted Ramon Guiu, senior director of product management at New Relic. “The CoScale team members joining New Relic will focus on incorporating CoScale’s capabilities and experience into continuing innovations for the New Relic platform.”

The deal underscores how New Relic has had to shift in the last couple of years: when the company was founded years ago, application monitoring was a relatively easy task, with the web and a specified number of services the limit of what needed attention. But services, apps and functions have become increasingly complex and now tap data stored across a range of locations and devices, and processing everything generates a lot of computing demand.

New Relic first added container and microservices monitoring to its stack in 2016. That’s a somewhat late arrival to the area, New Relic CEO Lew Cirne believes that it’s just at the right time, dovetailing New Relic’s changes with wider shifts in the market.

‘We think those changes have actually been an opportunity for us to further differentiate and further strengthen our thesis that the New Relic  way is really the most logical way to address this,” he told my colleague Ron Miller last month. As Ron wrote, Cirne’s take is that New Relic has always been centered on the code, as opposed to the infrastructure where it’s delivered, and that has helped it make adjustments as the delivery mechanisms have changed.

New Relic already provides monitoring for Kubernetes, Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE), Amazon Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes (EKS), Microsoft Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS), and RedHat Openshift, and the idea is that CoScale will help it ramp up across that range, while also adding Docker and OpenShift to the mix, as well as offering new services down the line to serve the DevOps community.

“The visions of New Relic and CoScale are remarkably well aligned, so our team is excited that we get to join New Relic and continue on our journey of helping companies innovate faster by providing them visibility into the performance of their modern architectures,” said CoScale CEO Stijn Polfliet, in a statement. “[Co-founder] Fred [Ryckbosch] and I feel like this is such an exciting space and time to be in this market, and we’re thrilled to be teaming up with the amazing team at New Relic, the leader in monitoring modern applications and infrastructure.”

Aug
15
2018
--

Twistlock snares $33 million Series C investment to secure cloud native environments

As the world shifts to a cloud native approach, the way you secure applications as they get deployed is changing too. Twistlock, a company built from the ground up to secure cloud native environments, announced a $33 million Series C round today led by Iconiq Capital.

Previous investors YL Ventures, TenEleven, Rally Ventures, Polaris Partners and Dell Technologies Capital also participated in the round. The company reports it has received a total of $63 million in venture investment to date.

Twistlock is solving a hard problem around securing containers and serverless, which are by their nature ephemeral. They can live for fractions of seconds making it hard track problems when they happen. According to company CEO and co-founder Ben Bernstein, his company came out of the gate building a security product designed to protect a cloud-native environment with the understanding that while containers and serverless computing may be ephemeral, they are still exploitable.

“It’s not about how long they live, but about the fact that the way they live is more predictable than a traditional computer, which could be running for a very long time and might have humans actually using it,” Bernstein said.

Screenshot: Twistlock

As companies move to a cloud native environment using Dockerized containers and managing them with Kubernetes and other tools, they create a highly automated system to deal with the deployment volume. While automation simplifies deployment, it can also leave companies vulnerable to host of issues. For example, if a malicious actor were to get control of the process via a code injection attack, they could cause a lot of problems without anyone knowing about it.

Twistlock is built to help prevent that, while also helping customers recognize when an exploit happens and performing forensic analysis to figure out how it happened.

It’s not a traditional Software as a Service as we’ve come to think of it. Instead, it is a service that gets installed on whatever public or private cloud that the customer is using. So far, they count just over 200 customers including Walgreens and Aetna and a slew of other companies you would definitely recognize, but they couldn’t name publicly.

The company, which was founded in 2015, is based in Portland, Oregon with their R&D arm in Israel. They currently have 80 employees. Bernstein said from a competitive standpoint, the traditional security vendors are having trouble reacting to cloud native, and while he sees some startups working at it, he believes his company has the most mature offering, at least for now.

“We don’t have a lot of competition right now, but as we start progressing we will see more,” he said. He plans to use the money they receive today to help expand their marketing and sales arm to continue growing their customer base, but also engineering to stay ahead of that competition as the cloud-native security market continues to develop.

Powered by WordPress | Theme: Aeros 2.0 by TheBuckmaker.com