Oct
02
2018
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NYC wants to build a cyber army

Empires rise and fall, and none more so than business empires. Whole industries that once dominated the planet are just a figment in memory’s eye, while new industries quietly grow into massive behemoths.

New York City has certainly seen its share of empires. Today, the city is a global center of finance, real estate, legal services, technology, and many, many more industries. It hosts the headquarters of roughly 10% of the Fortune 500, and the metro’s GDP is roughly equivalent to that of Canada.

So much wealth and power, and all under constant attack. The value of technology and data has skyrocketed, and so has the value of stealing and disrupting the services that rely upon it. Cyber crime and cyber wars are adding up: according to a report published jointly between McAfee and the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the costs of these operations are in the hundreds of billions of dollars – and New York’s top industries such as financial services bear the brunt of the losses.

Yet, New York City has hardly been a bastion for the cybersecurity industry. Boston and Washington DC are far stronger today on the Acela corridor, and San Francisco and Israel have both made huge impacts on the space. Now, NYC’s leaders are looking to build a whole new local empire that might just act as a bulwark for its other leading ecosystems.

Today, the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) announced the launch of Cyber NYC, a $30 million “catalyzing” investment designed to rapidly grow the city’s ecosystem and infrastructure for cybersecurity.

James Patchett, CEO of New York City Economic Development Corporation. (Photo from NYCEDC)

James Patchett, CEO of NYCEDC, explained in an interview with TechCrunch that cybersecurity is “both an incredible opportunity and also a huge threat.” He noted that “the financial industry has been the lifeblood of this city for our entire history,” and the costs of cybercrime are rising quickly. “It’s a lose-lose if we fail to invest in the innovation that keeps the city strong” but “it’s a win if we can create all of that innovation here and the corresponding jobs,” he said.

The Cyber NYC program is made up of a constellation of programs:

  • Partnering with Jerusalem Venture Partners, an accelerator called Hub.NYC will develop enterprise cybersecurity companies by connecting them with advisors and customers. The program will be hosted in a nearly 100,000 square foot building in SoHo.
  • Partnering with SOSA, the city will create a new, 15,000 square foot Global Cyber Center co-working facility in Chelsea, where talented individuals in the cyber industry can hang out and learn from each other through event programming and meetups.
  • With Fullstack Academy and Laguardia Community College, a Cyber Boot Camp will be created to enhance the ability of local workers to find jobs in the cybersecurity space.
  • Through an “Applied Learning Initiative,” students will be able to earn a “CUNY-Facebook Master’s Degree” in cybersecurity. The program has participation from the City University of New York, New York University, Columbia University, Cornell Tech, and iQ4.
  • With Columbia University’s Technology Ventures, NYCEDC will introduce a program called Inventors to Founders that will work to commercialize university research.

NYCEDC’s map of the Cyber NYC initiative. (Photo from NYCEDC)

In addition to Facebook, other companies have made commitments to the program, including Goldman Sachs, MasterCard, PricewaterhouseCoopers, and edX.org. Two Goldman execs, Chief Operational Risk Officer Phil Venables and Chief Information Security Officer Andy Ozment, have joined the initiative’s advisory boards.

The NYCEDC estimates that there are roughly 6,000 cybersecurity professionals currently employed in New York City. Through these programs, it estimates that the number could increase by another 10,000. Patchett said that “it is as close to a no-brainer in economic development because of the opportunity and the risk.”

From Jerusalem to New York

To tackle its ambitious cybersecurity goals, the NYCEDC is partnering with two venture firms, Jerusalem Venture Partners (JVP) and SOSA, with significant experience investing, operating, and growing companies in the sector.

Jerusalem-based JVP is an established investor that should help founders at Hub.NYC get access to smart capital, sector expertise, and the entrepreneurial experience needed to help their startups scale. JVP invests in early-, late-, and growth-stage companies focused on cybersecurity, big data, media, and enterprise software.

JVP will run Hub.NYC, a startup accelerator that will help cybersecurity startups connect with customers and mentors. (Photo from JVP)

Erel Margalit, who founded the firm in 1993, said that “If you look at what JVP has done … we create ecosystems.” Working with Jerusalem’s metro government, Margalit and the firm pioneered a number of institutions such as accelerators that turned Israel into an economic powerhouse in the cybersecurity industry. His social and economic work eventually led him to the Knesset, Israel’s unicameral legislature, where he served as an MP from 2015-2017 with the Labor Party.

Israel is a very small country with a relative dearth of large companies though, a huge challenge for startups looking to scale up. “Today if you want to build the next-generation leading companies, you have to be not only where the ideas are being brewed, but also where the solutions are being [purchased],” Margalit explained. “You need to be working with the biggest customers in the world.”

That place, in his mind, is New York City. It’s a city he has known since his youth – he worked at Moshe’s Moving IN NYC while attending Columbia as a grad student where he got his PhD in philosophy. Now, he can pack up his own success from Israel and scale it up to an even larger ecosystem.

Since its founding, JVP has successfully raised $1.1 billion across eight funds, including a $60 million fund specifically focused on the cybersecurity space. Over the same period, the firm has seen 32 successful exits, including cybersecurity companies CyberArk (IPO in 2014) and CyActive (Acquired by PayPal in 2013).

JVP’s efforts in the cybersecurity space also go beyond the investment process, with the firm recently establishing an incubator, known as JVP Cyber Labs, specifically focused on identifying, nurturing and building the next wave of Israeli cybersecurity and big data companies.

On average, the firm has focused on deals in the $5-$10 million range, with a general proclivity for earlier-stage companies where the firm can take a more hands-on mentorship role. Some of JVP’s notable active portfolio companies include Source Defense, which uses automation to protect against website supply chain attacks, ThetaRay, which uses big data to analyze threats, and Morphisec, which sells endpoint security solutions.

Opening up innovation with SOSA

The self-described “open-innovation platform,” SOSA is a global network of corporations, investors, and entrepreneurs that connects major institutions with innovative startups tackling core needs.

SOSA works closely with its partner startups, providing investor sourcing, hands-on mentorship and the physical resources needed to achieve growth. The group’s areas of expertise include cybersecurity, fintech, automation, energy, mobility, and logistics. Though headquartered in Tel Aviv, SOSA recently opened an innovation lab in New York, backed by major partners including HP, RBC, and Jefferies.

With the eight-floor Global Cyber Center located in Chelsea, it is turning its attention to an even more ambitious agenda. Uzi Scheffer, CEO of SOSA, said to TechCrunch in a statement that “The Global Cyber Center will serve as a center of gravity for the entire cybersecurity industry where they can meet, interact and connect to the finest talent from New York, the States, Israel and our entire global network.”

SOSA’s new building in Chelsea will be a center for the cybersecurity community (Photo from SOSA)

With an already established presence in New York, SOSA’s local network could help spur the local corporate participation key to the EDC’s plan, while SOSA’s broader global network can help achieve aspirations of turning New York City into a global cybersecurity leader.

It is no coincidence that both of the EDC’s venture partners are familiar with the Israeli cybersecurity ecosystem. Israel has long been viewed as a leader in cybersecurity innovation and policy, and has benefited from the same successful public-private sector coordination New York hopes to replicate.

Furthermore, while New York hopes to create organic growth within its own local ecosystem, the partnerships could also benefit the city if leading Israeli cybersecurity companies look to relocate due to the limited size of the Israeli market.

Big plans, big results?

While we spent comparatively less time discussing them, the NYCEDC’s educational programs are particularly interesting. Students will be able to take classes at any university in the five-member consortium, and transfer credits freely, a concept that the NYCEDC bills as “stackable certificates.”

Meanwhile, Facebook has partnered with the City University of New York to create a professional master’s degree program to train up a new class of cybersecurity leaders. The idea is to provide a pathway to a widely-respected credential without having to take too much time off of work. NYCEDC CEO Patchett said, ”you probably don’t have the time to take two years off to do a masters program,” and so the program’s flexibility should provide better access to more professionals.

Together, all of these disparate programs add up to a bold attempt to put New York City on the map for cybersecurity. Talent development, founder development, customer development – all have been addressed with capital and new initiatives.

Will the community show up at initiatives like the Global Cyber Center, pictured here? (Photo from SOSA)

Yet, despite the time that NYCEDC has spent to put all of these partners together cohesively under one initiative, the real challenge starts with getting the community to participate and build upon these nascent institutions. “What we hear from folks a lot of time,” Patchett said to us, is that “there is no community for cyber professionals in New York City.” Now the buildings have been placed, but the people need to walk through the front doors.

The city wants these programs to be self-sustaining as soon as possible. “In all cases, we don’t want to support these ecosystems forever,” Patchett said. “If we don’t think they’re financially sustainable, we haven’t done our job right.” He believes that “there should be a natural incentive to invest once the ecosystem is off the ground.”

As the world encounters an ever-increasing array of cyber threats, old empires can falter – and new empires can grow. Cybersecurity may well be one of the next great industries, and it may just provide the needed defenses to ensure that New York City’s other empires can live another day.

Apr
18
2018
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Stripe debuts Radar anti-fraud AI tools for big businesses, says it has halted $4B in fraud to date

Cybersecurity continues to be a growing focus and problem in the digital world, and now Stripe is launching a new paid product that it hopes will help its customers better battle one of the bigger side-effects of data breaches: online payment fraud. Today, Stripe is announcing Radar for Fraud Teams, an expansion of its free AI-based Radar service that runs alongside Stripe’s core payments API to help identify and block fraudulent transactions.

And there are further efforts that Stripe is planning in coming months. Michael Manapat, Stripe’s engineering manager for Radar and machine learning, said the company is going to soon launch a private beta of a “dynamic authentication” that will bring in two-factor authentication. This is on top of Stripe’s first forays into using biometric factors in payments, made via partners like Apple and Google. With these and others, fingerprints and other physical attributes have become increasingly popular ways to identify mobile and other users.

The initial iteration of Radar launched in October 2016, and since then, Manapat tells me that it has prevented $4 billion in fraud for its “hundreds of thousands” of customers.

Considering the wider scope of how much e-commerce is affected by fraud — one study estimates $57.8 billion in e-commerce fraud across eight major verticals in a one-year period between 2016 and 2017 — this is a decent dent, but there is a lot more work to be done. And Stripe’s position of knowing four out of every five payment card numbers globally (on account of the ubiquity of its payments API) gives it a strong position to be able to tackle it.

The new paid product comes alongside an update to the core, free product that Stripe is dubbing Radar 2.0, which Stripe claims will have more advanced machine learning built into it and can therefore up its fraud detection by some 25 percent over the previous version.

New features for the whole product (free and paid) will include being able to detect when a proxy VPN is being used (which fraudsters might use to appear like they are in one country when they are actually in another) and ingesting billions of data points to train its model, which is now being updated on a daily basis automatically — itself an improvement on the slower and more manual system that Manapat said Stripe has been using for the past couple of years.

Meanwhile, the paid product is an interesting development.

At the time of the original launch, Stripe co-founder John Collison hinted that the company would be considering a paid product down the line. Stripe has said multiple times that it’s in no rush to go public — and statement that a spokesperson reiterated this week — but it’s notable that a paid tier is a sign of how Stripe is slowly building up more monetization and revenue generation.

Stripe is valued at around $9.2 billion as of its last big round in 2016. Most recently, it raised $150 million back in that November 2016 round. A $44 million from March of this year, noted in Pitchbook, was actually related to issuing stock related to its quiet acquisition of point-of-sale payments startup Index in that month — incidentally another interesting move for Stripe to expand its position and placement in the payments ecosystem. Stripe has raised around $450 million in total.

The Teams product, aimed at businesses that are big enough to have dedicated fraud detection staff, will be priced at an additional $0.02 per transaction, on top of Stripe’s basic transaction fees of a 2.9 percent commission plus 30 cents per successful card charge in the U.S. (fees vary in other markets).

The chief advantage of taking the paid product will be that teams will be able to customise how Radar works with their own transactions.

This will include a more complete set of data for teams that review transactions, and a more granular set of tools to determine where and when sales are reviewed, for example based on usage patterns or the size of the transaction. There are already a set of flags the work to note when a card is used in frequent succession across disparate geographies; but Manapat said that newer details such as analysing the speed at which payment details are entered and purchases are made will now also factor into how it flags transactions for review.

Similarly, teams will be able to determine the value at which a transaction needs to be flagged. This is the online equivalent of when certain purchases require or waive you to enter a PIN or provide a signature to seal the deal. (And it’s interesting to see that some e-commerce operations are potentially allowing some dodgy sales to happen simply to keep up the user experience for the majority of legitimate transactions.)

Users of the paid product will also be able to now use Radar to help with their overall management of how it handles fraud. This will include being able to keep lists of attributes, names and numbers that are scrutinised, and to check against them with analytics also created by Stripe to help identify trending issues, and to plan anti-fraud activities going forward.

Updated with further detail about Stripe’s funding.

Feb
05
2018
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Businesses with Apple and Cisco products may now pay less for cybersecurity insurance

 Apple and Cisco announced this morning a new deal with insurer Allianz that will allow businesses with their technology products to receive better terms on their cyber insurance coverage, including lower deductibles – or even no deductibles, in some cases. Allianz said it made the decision to offer these better terms after evaluating the technical foundation of Apple and… Read More

Jul
18
2017
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Corelight closes $9.2M Series A to help enterprises battle ransomware

 It’s already been a year of multiple high profile ransomware attacks and now cybersecurity startup Corelight has bagged a $9.2 million Series A round, led by Accel Partners. Read More

Jul
10
2017
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More funding for AI cybersecurity: Darktrace raises $75M at an $825M valuation

Digital security key concept background with binary data code With cybercrime projected to reap some $6 trillion in damages by 2021, and businesses likely to invest around $1 trillion over the next five years to try to mitigate that, we’re seeing a rise of startups that are building innovative ways to combat malicious hackers.
In the latest development, Darktrace — a cybersecurity firm that uses machine learning to detect and stop attacks… Read More

Jan
24
2017
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Secret Double Octopus nabs $6M for a stronger, easier alternative to regular 2FA

8093376393_713fb93477_k Israel is home to around 450 active startups in the field of cybersecurity, according to a recent report in Reuters. Now, the one with perhaps the most distinctive name of them all is announcing some funding for a novel approach to authentication. Secret Double Octopus — which borrows a concept from the world of nuclear launch codes to build extra-secure, but simple, keyless… Read More

Jan
24
2017
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Microsoft Ventures backs Illusive Networks, a cybersecurity firm that protects with deception

generic_code_hack_security Illusive Networks, a cybersecurity startup based out of Israel that protects networks by building “deception” frameworks to identify and trap malicious hackers, is today announcing that it has added Microsoft Ventures — the software giant’s young investment arm — as its newest strategic investor. In keeping with the its name and purpose in this world, Illusive… Read More

Oct
25
2016
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HYPR raises $3 million to keep hackers from getting their hands on your fingerprints

Fingerprint If your account gets hacked these days, the first thing you’ll do typically is reset your password, maybe beef up your security settings, and proceed to use the account or app again. But what if hackers get their hands on your fingerprint, iris or other biometric data? You can’t just change your fingerprints or eyes on a whim. That’s where a New York City startup called… Read More

Jul
19
2016
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Sift Science raises $30 million to predict and prevent fraud everywhere online

Hand working at laptop computer illustrating cyber crime To predict and prevent fraud online even more quickly than cybercriminals adopt new tactics, Sift Science has raised $30 million in a Series C round of venture funding in a round led by Insight Venture Partners. According to the U.S. Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) 2015 annual report, reported internet crimes alone, ranging from personal and corporate data breaches to credit card… Read More

Jun
09
2016
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Cylance, fighting malicious hackers with AI, hits $1B valuation after raising $100M

cyber-security-data-sharing “If you can’t beat them, join them” may not sound like the most encouraging pitch for a cybersecurity company, but a startup called Cylance has created an artificial intelligence-powered brain that essentially does just that, and it has taken off — raising $100 million in a Series D round of funding and catapulting itself into the so-called ‘unicorn’ club… Read More

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