Mar
13
2019
--

Live MySQL Slave Rebuild with Percona Toolkit

MySQL slave data out of sync

MySQL slave data out of syncRecently, we had an edge case where a MySQL slave went out-of-sync but it couldn’t be rebuilt from scratch. The slave was acting as a master server to some applications and it had data was being written to it. It was a design error, and this is not recommended, but it happened. So how do you synchronize the data in this circumstance? This blog post describes the steps taken to recover from this situation. The tools used to recover the slave were pt-slave-restartpt-table-checksum, pt-table-sync and mysqldiff.

Scenario

To illustrate this situation, it was built a master x slave configuration with sysbench running on the master server to simulate a general application workload. The environment was set with a Percona Server 5.7.24-26 and sysbench 1.0.16.

Below are the sysbench commands to prepare and simulate the workload:

# Create Data
sysbench --db-driver=mysql --mysql-user=root --mysql-password=msandbox \
  --mysql-socket=/tmp/mysql_sandbox45008.sock --mysql-db=test --range_size=100 \
  --table_size=5000 --tables=100 --threads=1 --events=0 --time=60 \
  --rand-type=uniform /usr/share/sysbench/oltp_read_only.lua prepare
# Simulate Workload
sysbench --db-driver=mysql --mysql-user=root --mysql-password=msandbox \
  --mysql-socket=/tmp/mysql_sandbox45008.sock --mysql-db=test --range_size=100 \
  --table_size=5000 --tables=100 --threads=10 --events=0 --time=6000 \
  --rand-type=uniform /usr/share/sysbench/oltp_read_write.lua --report-interval=1 run

With the environment set, the slave server was stopped, and some operations to desynchronize the slave were performed to reproduce the problem.

Fixing the issue

With the slave desynchronized, a restart on the replication was executed. Immediately, the error below appeared:

Last_IO_Errno: 1236
Last_IO_Error: Got fatal error 1236 from master when reading data from binary log: 'Could not find first log file name in binary log index file'

To recover the slave from this error, we had to point the slave to an existing binary log with a valid binary log position. To get a valid binary log position, the command shown below had to be executed on the master:

master [localhost] {msandbox} ((none)) > show master status\G
*************************** 1. row ***************************
File: mysql-bin.000007
Position: 218443612
Binlog_Do_DB:
Binlog_Ignore_DB:
Executed_Gtid_Set:
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

Then, a CHANGE MASTER command was run on the slave:

slave1 [localhost] {msandbox} (test) > change master to master_log_file='mysql-bin.000007', MASTER_LOG_POS=218443612;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
slave1 [localhost] {msandbox} (test) > start slave;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

Now the slave had a valid binary log file to read, but since it was inconsistent, it hit another error:

Last_SQL_Errno: 1032
               Last_SQL_Error: Could not execute Delete_rows event on table test.sbtest8; Can't find record in 'sbtest8', Error_code: 1032; handler error HA_ERR_KEY_NOT_FOUND; the event's master log mysql-bin.000005, end_log_pos 326822861

Working past the errors

Before fixing the inconsistencies, it was necessary to keep the replication running and to skip the errors. For this, the pt-slave-restart tool will be used. The tool needs to be run on the slave server:

pt-slave-restart --user root --socket=/tmp/mysql_sandbox45008.sock --ask-pass

The tool skips errors and starts the replication threads. Below is an example of the output of the pt-slave-restart:

$ pt-slave-restart --user root --socket=/tmp/mysql_sandbox45009.sock --ask-pass
Enter password:
2019-02-22T14:18:01 S=/tmp/mysql_sandbox45009.sock,p=...,u=root mysql-relay.000007        1996 1146
2019-02-22T14:18:02 S=/tmp/mysql_sandbox45009.sock,p=...,u=root mysql-relay.000007        8698 1146
2019-02-22T14:18:02 S=/tmp/mysql_sandbox45009.sock,p=...,u=root mysql-relay.000007       38861 1146

Finding the inconsistencies

With the tool running on one terminal, the phase to check the inconsistencies began. First things first, an object definition check was performed using mysqldiff utility. The mysqldiff tool is part of MySQL utilities. To execute the tool:

$ mysqldiff --server1=root:msandbox@localhost:48008 --server2=root:msandbox@localhost:48009 test:test --difftype=sql --changes-for=server2

And below are the differences found between the master and the slave:

1-) A table that doesn’t exist

# WARNING: Objects in server1.test but not in server2.test:
# TABLE: joinit

2-) A wrong table structure

# Comparing `test`.`sbtest98` to `test`.`sbtest98` [FAIL]
# Transformation for --changes-for=server2:
#
ALTER TABLE `test`.`sbtest98`
DROP INDEX k_98,
DROP COLUMN x,
ADD INDEX k_98 (k);

Performing the recommendations on the slave (creating the table and the table modification) the object’s definition was now equal. The next step was to check data consistency. For this, the pt-table-checksum was used to identify which tables are out-of-sync. This command was run on the master server.

$ pt-table-checksum -uroot -pmsandbox --socket=/tmp/mysql_sandbox48008.sock --replicate=percona.checksums --create-replicate-table --empty-replicate-table --no-check-binlog-format --recursion-method=hosts

And an output example:

01 master]$ pt-table-checksum --recursion-method dsn=D=percona,t=dsns --no-check-binlog-format --nocheck-replication-filter --host 127.0.0.1 --user root --port 48008 --password=msandbox
Checking if all tables can be checksummed ...
Starting checksum ...
  at /usr/bin/pt-table-checksum line 332.
Replica lag is 66 seconds on bm-support01.bm.int.percona.com.  Waiting.
Replica lag is 46 seconds on bm-support01.bm.int.percona.com.  Waiting.
Replica lag is 33 seconds on bm-support01.bm.int.percona.com.  Waiting.
           TS ERRORS  DIFFS     ROWS  DIFF_ROWS  CHUNKS SKIPPED    TIME TABLE
02-26T16:27:59      0      0     5000          0       1       0   0.037 test.sbtest1
02-26T16:27:59      0      0     5000          0       1       0   0.039 test.sbtest10
02-26T16:27:59      0      1     5000          0       1       0   0.033 test.sbtest100
02-26T16:27:59      0      1     5000          0       1       0   0.034 test.sbtest11
02-26T16:27:59      0      1     5000          0       1       0   0.040 test.sbtest12
02-26T16:27:59      0      1     5000          0       1       0   0.034 test.sbtest13

Fixing the data inconsistencies

Analyzing the DIFFS column it is possible to identify which tables were compromised. With this information, the pt-table-sync tool was used to fix these inconsistencies. The tool synchronizes MySQL table data efficiently, performing non-op changes on the master so they can be replicated and applied on the slave. The tools need to be run on the slave server. Below is an example of the tool running:

$ pt-table-sync --execute --sync-to-master h=localhost,u=root,p=msandbox,D=test,t=sbtest100,S=/tmp/mysql_sandbox48009.sock

It is possible to perform a dry-run of the tool before executing the changes to check what changes the tool will apply:

$ pt-table-sync --print --sync-to-master h=localhost,u=root,p=msandbox,D=test,t=sbtest100,S=/tmp/mysql_sandbox48009.sock
REPLACE INTO `test`.`sbtest100`(`id`, `k`, `c`, `pad`) VALUES ('1', '1654', '97484653464-60074971666-42998564849-40530823048-27591234964-93988623123-02188386693-94155746040-59705759910-14095637891', '15000678573-85832916990-95201670192-53956490549-57402857633') /*percona-toolkit src_db:test src_tbl:sbtest100 src_dsn:D=test,P=48008,S=/tmp/mysql_sandbox48009.sock,h=127.0.0.1,p=...,t=sbtest100,u=root dst_db:test dst_tbl:sbtest100 dst_dsn:D=test,S=/tmp/mysql_sandbox48009.sock,h=localhost,p=...,t=sbtest100,u=root lock:1 transaction:1 changing_src:1 replicate:0 bidirectional:0 pid:17806 user:vinicius.grippa host:bm-support01.bm.int.percona.com*/;
REPLACE INTO `test`.`sbtest100`(`id`, `k`, `c`, `pad`) VALUES ('2', '3007', '31679133794-00154186785-50053859647-19493043469-34585653717-64321870163-33743380797-12939513287-31354198555-82828841987', '30122503210-11153873086-87146161761-60299188705-59630949292') /*percona-toolkit src_db:test src_tbl:sbtest100 src_dsn:D=test,P=48008,S=/tmp/mysql_sandbox48009.sock,h=127.0.0.1,p=...,t=sbtest100,u=root dst_db:test dst_tbl:sbtest100 dst_dsn:D=test,S=/tmp/mysql_sandbox48009.sock,h=localhost,p=...,t=sbtest100,u=root lock:1 transaction:1 changing_src:1 replicate:0 bidirectional:0 pid:17806 user:vinicius.grippa host:bm-support01.bm.int.percona.com*/;

After executing the pt-table-sync, we recommend that you run the pt-table-checksum again and check if the DIFFS column shows the value of 0.

Conclusion

This blog post was intended to cover all possible issues that could happen on a slave when it goes out-of-sync such as DDL operations, binary log purge and DML operations. This process involves many steps and it could take a long time to finish, especially in large databases. Note that this process might take longer than the backup/restore process. However, in situations like the one mentioned above, it might be the only solution to recover a slave.


Image based on Photo by Randy Fath on Unsplash

 

Jun
13
2018
--

Webinar Thurs 6/14: MongoDB Backup and Recovery Field Guide

mongodb backup and recovery field guide

mongodb backup and recovery field guidePlease join Percona’s Sr. Technical Operations Architect, Tim Vaillancourt as he presents MongoDB Backup and Recovery Field Guide on Thursday, June 14, 2018, at 10:00 AM PDT (UTC-7) / 1:00 PM EDT (UTC-4).

This talk will cover backup and recovery solutions for MongoDB replica sets and clusters, focusing on online and low-impact solutions for production systems.

Register for the webinar

Tim Vaillancourt

Senior Technical Operations Architect

With experience operating infrastructures in industries such as government, online marketing/publishing, SaaS and gaming combined with experience tuning systems from the hard disk all the way up to the end-user, Tim has spent time in nearly every area of the modern IT stack with many lessons learned.

Tim is based in Amsterdam, NL and enjoys traveling, coding and music. Prior to Percona Tim was the Lead MySQL DBA of Electronic Arts’ DICE studios, helping some of the largest games in the world (“Battlefield” series, “Mirrors Edge” series, “Star Wars: Battlefront”) launch and operate smoothly while also leading the automation of MongoDB deployments for EA systems. Before the role of DBA at EA’s DICE studio, Tim served as a subject matter expert in NoSQL databases, queues and search on the Online Operations team at EA SPORTS.

Prior to moving to the gaming industry, Tim served as a Database/Systems Admin operating a large MySQL-based SaaS infrastructure at AbeBooks/Amazon Inc.

The post Webinar Thurs 6/14: MongoDB Backup and Recovery Field Guide appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Apr
28
2017
--

Data management startup Rubrik confirms $180M round at a $1.3B valuation

Data flying over group of laptops to illustrate data integration/sharing. Rubrik, a startup that provides data backup and recovery services for enterprises across both cloud and on-premises environments, has closed a $180 million round of funding that values the company at $1.3 billion. The news confirms a report we ran earlier this week noting that the company was raising between $150 million and $200 million. Read More

Dec
16
2015
--

Using dbsake to recover table structure from .frm files and process mysqldump output

dbsakeWe work on data recoveries quite often. In many cases, we recover table structures from the .frm files because there was no backup available. There is already a great blog post by my colleague Miguel Ángel Nieto about how we can recover structures from .frm files using MySQL utilities.

This works pretty well and we prefer to run mysqlfrm with the “–server” option to get all possible information from a .frm file. However, this option expects that MySQL is up and running so that mysqlfrm can spawn a new MySQL instance, and run the structure recovery there.

Recently I came across a tool that makes this job easier. The name of tool is dbsake, it’s a collection of command-line tools that perform various DBA related tasks for MySQL. In this blog, we will look at two very useful dbsake commands.

Installation is very easy and straightforward. It’s in an executable python zip archive with all dependencies included.

# curl -s http://get.dbsake.net > dbsake
# chmod u+x dbsake
# ./dbsake --version
dbsake, version 2.1.0 9525896

Recovering table structures from MySQL .frm files with dbsake

To recover table structures using dbsake, you need to use the “dbsake frmdump” command, followed by the .frm file path. The frmdump command decodes the MySQL .frm file and provides a “CREATE TABLE” or “CREATE VIEW” statement in the output. The good thing is that it doesn’t require a running a MySQL server instance, and interprets the .frm file according to rules similar to the MySQL server.

Let’s see an example:

# ./dbsake frmdump /var/lib/mysql/sakila/staff.frm
--
-- Table structure for table `staff`
-- Created with MySQL Version 5.6.27
--
CREATE TABLE `staff` (
`staff_id` tinyint(3) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
`first_name` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
`last_name` varchar(45) NOT NULL,
`address_id` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL,
`picture` blob,
`email` varchar(50) DEFAULT NULL,
`store_id` tinyint(3) unsigned NOT NULL,
`active` tinyint(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT '1',
`username` varchar(16) NOT NULL,
`password` varchar(40) CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_bin DEFAULT NULL,
`last_update` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
PRIMARY KEY (`staff_id`),
KEY `idx_fk_store_id` (`store_id`),
KEY `idx_fk_address_id` (`address_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

The result looks pretty good, and has recovered the character set and collation information as well. We can also see the MySQL version (5.6.27) retrieved from the .frm file. It is important to mention that the command only decodes the information available in .frm file, which means that it cannot recover InnoDB foreign-key references and AUTO_INCREMENT values. These items are stored outside of the .frm file.

The frmdump command makes the recovery process easy and faster. We can easily script this and recover the structure of a large number of tables. For example, if we need to recover the structure of all tables from a world database, we can do following:

mysql> create database world_recover;
# for tbl in `ls -1 /var/lib/mysql/world/*.frm`; do ./dbsake frmdump $tbl | mysql world_recover; done;
mysql> show tables from world_recover;
+-------------------------+
| Tables_in_world_recover |
+-------------------------+
| city                    |
| country                 |
| countrylanguage         |
+-------------------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Filter and transform a mysqldump stream with dbsake

It’s a very common requirement to filter one or more tables from a mysqldump full database backup. The “dbsake sieve [options]” command helps us to filter or transform mysqldump output.

Let’s see how to extract a single table from a mysqldump file.

# mysqldump world > world.sql
# cat world.sql | ./dbsake sieve -t world.city > world.city.sql
Processed . Output: 1 database(s) 1 table(s) and 0 view(s)

The “-t” or “–table” option tells the command to only output the table matching the given pattern. It will also show the number of databases, tables or views processed in output.

To extract multiple tables, you can pass “-t db.tbl” multiple times.

# cat world.sql | ./dbsake sieve -t world.city -t world.country > world.city_country.sql
Processed . Output: 1 database(s) 2 table(s) and 0 view(s)
# cat world.city_country.sql | grep -i 'create table'
CREATE TABLE `city` (
CREATE TABLE `country` (

The latest Percona server added the new option “–innodb-optimize-keys” in mysqldump. It changes the way InnoDB tables are dumped, so that secondary keys are created after loading the data, thus taking advantage of InnoDB fast index creation. This is a really great feature in that it helps us to restore data more efficiently than the default incremental rebuild that mysqldump performs.

Using the “dbsake sieve [options]” command, we can transform the regular mysqldump output to take advantage of fast index creation. The “–defer-indexes” option rewrites the output of CREATE TABLE statements, and arranges for secondary indexes to be created after the table data is loaded. Similarly the “–defer-foreign-keys” option can be added to add foreign key constraints after loading table data.

Let’s see an example:

# cat world.sql | ./dbsake sieve --defer-indexes --defer-foreign-keys -t world.city  > world.city.sql
Processed . Output: 1 database(s) 1 table(s) and 0 view(s)

This means that world.city.sql will have a table structure with the Primary Key first, then will insert statements to load data, and an additional ALTER TABLE statement to create secondary keys when there is at least one secondary index to be added. Foreign keys will also created with secondary indexes.

The original structure of table world.city:

CREATE TABLE `city` (
  `ID` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `Name` char(35) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `CountryCode` char(3) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `District` char(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `Population` int(11) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  PRIMARY KEY (`ID`),
  KEY `CountryCode` (`CountryCode`),
  CONSTRAINT `city_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`CountryCode`) REFERENCES `country` (`Code`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=4080 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;

And the transformation done by dbsake:

...........
CREATE TABLE `city` (
  `ID` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `Name` char(35) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `CountryCode` char(3) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `District` char(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
  `Population` int(11) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  PRIMARY KEY (`ID`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=4080 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
...........
LOCK TABLES `city` WRITE;
...........
INSERT INTO `city` VALUES .....................
...........
UNLOCK TABLES;
--
-- InnoDB Fast Index Creation (generated by dbsake)
--
ALTER TABLE `city`
  ADD KEY `CountryCode` (`CountryCode`),
  ADD CONSTRAINT `city_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`CountryCode`) REFERENCES `country` (`Code`);
...........

For more sieve command options, please read the online manual.

Conclusion

The dbsake command makes it easier to recover table structures from .frm files. We can also filter and transform the mysqldump output easily without writing a complex awk or sed script. There are some more useful features of this tool that you can read about in the manual.

The post Using dbsake to recover table structure from .frm files and process mysqldump output appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Jan
02
2014
--

How to recover table structure from .frm files with MySQL Utilities

Table structures are stored in .frm files and in the InnoDB Data Dictionary. Sometimes, usually in data recovery issues, we need to recover those structures to be able to find the lost data or just to recreate the tables.

There are different ways to do it and we’ve already written about it in this blog. For example, we can use the data recovery tools to recover table structures from InnoDB Dictionary or from the .frm files using a MySQL Server. This blog post will be an update of that last one. I will show you how to easily recover the structure from a .frm file and in some cases even without using a MySQL server. This will make the process faster and easily scriptable.

MySQL Utilities and mysqlfrm

MySQL Utilities are a set of scripts released by Oracle that helps us to do some usual DBA tasks in an easier way. It is written in Python and it’s only dependency is the Python Connector. From the large list of utilities we are going to use mysqlfrm, the tool that will help us to recover the structure.

As usual, an image worth a thousand words. Let’s recover some table structures:

This is the table we have:

CREATE TABLE `new_table` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(45) DEFAULT NULL,
  `age` tinyint(4) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `name_idx` (`name`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

So, let’s try to recover that info from the .frm file and let’s see what we can get:

$ mysqlfrm --diagnostic /usr/local/mysql/data/test/new_table.frm
# WARNING: Cannot generate character set or collation names without the --server option.
[...]
CREATE TABLE `test`.`new_table` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(45) DEFAULT NULL,
  `age` tinyint(4) NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY `PRIMARY` (`id`),
KEY `name_idx` (`name`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

Pretty good result :)

It is important to mention that this tool has two different ways to do the recovery.

  • First one is spawning a new MySQL instance and run there the structure recovery, pretty similar to the one PeterZ explained in his blog post. You would need to use –server or –basedir directory along with –port. It will shut the spawned instance down after the recovery is complete.
  • The second one used with –diagnostic reads the .frm file byte by byte to recover all the information possible but without the requirement of a MySQL instance. Therefore, this method can be used to recover all the information possible from damaged .frm files that even MySQL can’t read.

As we can see in the warning of the last example not all information can be recovered with second method. For example character set or collation can’t be recovered without the –server option (first method). Let’s see how to use a spawned server to recover the .frm info:

$ mysqlfrm --server=root@127.0.0.1 --port 3307 ./new_table.frm
# Source on 127.0.0.1: ... connected.
# Starting the spawned server on port 3307 ... done.
# Reading .frm files
#
# Reading the new_table.frm file.
#
# CREATE statement for ./new_table.frm:
#
CREATE TABLE `new_table` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(45) DEFAULT NULL,
  `age` tinyint(4) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `name_idx` (`name`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

The tool connects to MySQL server, get all the info it needs (basedir and so on) and it spawns a new instance on port 3307. Then it uses that new instance to recover the info from the .frm file. Fast and easy :)

It is worth to mention that not all the information we could need is stored in those .frm files. There are some things that we won’t be able to recover, for example FK constraints and AI number sequences.

Conclusion

MySQL Utilities is a very useful set of tools. In this particular case mysqlfrm can be used to recover a large list of table structures from their .frm files, making the process fast and easy to script.

The post How to recover table structure from .frm files with MySQL Utilities appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Nov
05
2013
--

How to recover an orphaned .ibd file with MySQL 5.6

A few years ago Yves Trudeau and Aleksandr Kuzminsky wrote posts about different ways for recovering orphaned .ibd files:

Today I want to show you how to do that in more easy and quick way. In my example I’ll restore a “payment.ibd” file (payment table) from Sakila DB on a server with MySQL 5.5 (but with help from MySQL 5.6 and sandbox).

In my case the OS is CentOS. So I needed to:
install mysqlsandbox(check instructions there)
download latest Percona Server 5.6:

wget http://www.percona.com/redir/downloads/Percona-Server-5.6/LATEST/release-5.6.14-62.0/483/binary/linux/i686/Percona-Server-5.6.14-rel62.0-483.Linux.i686.tar.gz

create sandbox

make_sandbox Percona-Server-5.6.14-rel62.0-483.Linux.i686.tar.gz

test it

mysql -umsandbox -pmsandbox --host=127.0.0.1 --port=5614 -e "select @@version\G"
*************************** 1. row ***************************
@@version: 5.6.14-rel62.0

It Works!

check datadir and if the innodb_file_per_table option enabled (this is requirement)

mysql -umsandbox -pmsandbox --host=127.0.0.1 --port=5614 -e "show variables like 'datadir'"
+---------------+---------------------------------------+
| Variable_name | Value                                 |
+---------------+---------------------------------------+
| datadir       | /home/mixa/sandboxes/msb_5_6_14/data/ |
+---------------+---------------------------------------+

mysql -umsandbox -pmsandbox --host=127.0.0.1 --port=5614 -e "show variables like '%per_table'"
+-----------------------+-------+
| Variable_name         | Value |
+-----------------------+-------+
| innodb_file_per_table | ON    |
+-----------------------+-------+

If it’s not enabled then you’ll need to enable it

mysql -umsandbox -pmsandbox --host=127.0.0.1 --port=5614 -e "SET GLOBAL innodb_file_per_table=1"

create empty payment table on 5.6 sandbox

mysql -umsandbox -pmsandbox --host=127.0.0.1 --port=5614 test < payment_table.sql

payment_table.sql – is file with “SHOW CREATE TABLE” statement for payment table. The table structure should be the same.

cat payment_table.sql
CREATE TABLE `payment` (
  `payment_id` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `customer_id` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `staff_id` tinyint(3) unsigned NOT NULL,
  `rental_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `amount` decimal(5,2) NOT NULL,
  `payment_date` datetime NOT NULL,
  `last_update` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  PRIMARY KEY (`payment_id`),
  KEY `idx_fk_staff_id` (`staff_id`),
  KEY `idx_fk_customer_id` (`customer_id`),
  KEY `fk_payment_rental` (`rental_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB

stop sandbox

./sandboxes/msb_5_6_14/stop

replace .ibd file (in my case the correct copy of it is located in my homedir)

cp ~/payment.ibd ~/sandboxes/msb_5_6_14/data/test/ -f

make sure permissions are ok for .ibd file

sudo chmod 660 ~/sandboxes/msb_5_6_14/data/test/payment.ibd
sudo chown : ~/sandboxes/msb_5_6_14/data/test/payment.ibd

start sandbox

./sandboxes/msb_5_6_14/start

Currently if you’ll try to select something from the table you’ll get an error:

select from table

mysql -umsandbox -pmsandbox --host=127.0.0.1 --port=5614 -e "select count(*) from test.payment"
ERROR 2013 (HY000) at line 1: Lost connection to MySQL server during query
mysql -umsandbox -pmsandbox --host=127.0.0.1 --port=5614 -e "select count(*) from test.payment"
ERROR 1146 (42S02) at line 1: Table 'test.payment' doesn't exist

error log

2013-11-02 14:36:34 b7eff990  InnoDB: Error: table 'test/payment'
InnoDB: in InnoDB data dictionary has tablespace id 7,
InnoDB: but a tablespace with that id does not exist. There is
InnoDB: a tablespace of name test/payment and id 10, though. Have
InnoDB: you deleted or moved .ibd files?
...  ...
2013-11-02 14:36:36 11640 [ERROR] InnoDB: Failed to find tablespace for table '"test"."payment"' in the cache. Attempting to load the tablespace with space id 7.
2013-11-02 14:36:36 11640 [ERROR] InnoDB: In file './test/payment.ibd', tablespace id and flags are 10 and 0, but in the InnoDB data dictionary they are 7 and 0. Have you moved InnoDB .ibd files around without using the commands DISCARD TABLESPACE and IMPORT TABLESPACE? Please refer to http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/innodb-troubleshooting-datadict.html for how to resolve the issue.
2013-11-02 14:36:36 a31a2b90  InnoDB: Operating system error number 2 in a file operation.
InnoDB: The error means the system cannot find the path specified.
2013-11-02 14:36:36 11640 [ERROR] InnoDB: Could not find a valid tablespace file for 'test/payment'. See http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/innodb-troubleshooting-datadict.html for how to resolve the issue.
2013-11-02 14:36:36 a31a2b90 InnoDB: cannot calculate statistics for table "test"."payment" because the .ibd file is missing. For help, please refer to http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/innodb-troubleshooting.html

How to Fix it? In 5.6 tablespace management is very improved so the only thing needed is “ALTER TABLE .. DISCARD TABLESPACE” and “ALTER TABLE .. IMPORT TABLESPACE”.

Please check also limitations: Tablespace Copying Limitations

Look at example:

Discard tablespace

mysql -umsandbox -pmsandbox --host=127.0.0.1 --port=5614 -e "alter table test.payment discard tablespace; show warnings;"
+---------+------+--------------------------------------------------------+
| Level   | Code | Message                                                |
+---------+------+--------------------------------------------------------+
| Warning | 1812 | InnoDB: Tablespace is missing for table 'test/payment' |
| Warning | 1812 | InnoDB: Tablespace is missing for table 'payment'      |
+---------+------+--------------------------------------------------------+

Import tablespace

mysql -umsandbox -pmsandbox --host=127.0.0.1 --port=5614 -e "alter table test.payment import tablespace; show warnings"
+---------+------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Level   | Code | Message                                                                                                                                      |
+---------+------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Warning | 1810 | InnoDB: IO Read error: (2, No such file or directory) Error opening './test/payment.cfg', will attempt to import without schema verification |
+---------+------+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

That’s it, data recovered, payment table accessible on 5.6 sandbox.

Now check if data exists in payment table on sandbox:

mysql -umsandbox -pmsandbox --host=127.0.0.1 --port=5614 -e "select count(*) from test.payment"
+----------+
| count(*) |
+----------+
|    16049 |
+----------+
mysql -umsandbox -pmsandbox --host=127.0.0.1 --port=5614 -e "select * from test.payment limit 1\G"
*************************** 1. row ***************************
  payment_id: 1
 customer_id: 1
    staff_id: 1
   rental_id: 76
      amount: 2.99
payment_date: 0000-00-09 03:49:32
 last_update: 2028-02-08 12:32:35

Exists.

So dump it from sandbox and restore on 5.5:

dump from 5.6

mysqldump -umsandbox -pmsandbox --host=127.0.0.1 --port=5614 --add-drop-table test payment > ~/payment_dump.sql

restore to 5.5

mysql -u user -p  < ~/payment_dump.sql

Check if data exists on 5.5

mysql -u root -e "select * from test.payment limit 3;"
+------------+-------------+----------+-----------+--------+---------------------+---------------------+
| payment_id | customer_id | staff_id | rental_id | amount | payment_date        | last_update         |
+------------+-------------+----------+-----------+--------+---------------------+---------------------+
|          1 |           1 |        1 |        76 |   2.99 | 0000-00-09 03:49:32 | 2028-02-08 12:32:35 |
|          2 |           1 |        1 |       573 |   0.99 | 0000-00-09 03:49:32 | 0000-00-00 00:00:00 |
|          3 |           1 |        1 |      1185 |   5.99 | 0000-00-09 03:49:37 | 0000-00-00 00:00:00 |
+------------+-------------+----------+-----------+--------+---------------------+---------------------+

During my work with this case I got into a situation in which the drop table payment on 5.5 wasn’t possible because payment.idb there wasn’t correct – so the server crashed each time I tried to access to this table. The workaround is:
– stop server
– rm .ibd file
– start server
– drop table as usually by DROP TABLE command

The post How to recover an orphaned .ibd file with MySQL 5.6 appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Powered by WordPress | Theme: Aeros 2.0 by TheBuckmaker.com