Mar
20
2018
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Percona Blog Poll: What Percona Software Are You Using?

Percona Software

Percona SoftwareThis blog post contains a poll that helps us find out what Percona software the open source database community is using.

Nearly 20 years ago, Netscape released the source code for its Netscape Communicator web browser. This marked one of the biggest moments in “open source” history. The formation of The Open Source Initiative happened shortly after that. Bruce Perens, one of the working group’s founders, adapted his Free Software Guidelines as the official Open Source Definition.

Since then, open source software has gone from being the exception in large projects and enterprises, to being a normal part of huge deployments and daily business activities. Open source software is used by some of the biggest online companies: Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, etc. Many of these companies depend on open source software as part of their business model.

Percona’s mission is to champion unbiased open source database solutions. As part of this mission, we provide open source software, completely free of charge and for reuse. We developed our Percona Server for MySQL and Percona Server for MongoDB solutions to not only be drop-in replacements for existing open source software, but often incorporate “enterprise” features from upstream.

We’ve also recognized a need for a database clustering and backup solutions, and created Percona XtraDB Cluster and Percona XtraBackup to address those concerns.

Beyond database software, Percona has created management and monitoring tools like Percona Monitoring and Management that not only help DBAs with day-to-day tasks, but also use metrics to find out how best to configure, optimize and architect a database environment to best meet the needs of applications and websites.

What we’d like to know is which of our software products are you currently using in your database environment? Are you using just database software, just management and monitoring tools, or a combination of both? As Percona makes plans for the year, we’d like to know what the community is using, what they find helpful, and how we can best allocate our resources to address those needs. We are always looking for the best ways to invest in and grow the Percona software and tools people use.

Complete the survey below by selecting all the options that apply.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

Thanks in advance for your responses – this helps us see which of our software is being deployed in the community.

The post Percona Blog Poll: What Percona Software Are You Using? appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Oct
19
2017
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Percona Blog Poll: How Do You Currently Host Applications and Databases?

Host applications and databases

Host applications and databasesPercona latest blog poll asks how you currently host applications and databases. Select an option below, or leave a comment to clarify your deployment!

With the increased need for environments that respond more quickly to changing business demands, many enterprises are moving to the cloud and hosted deployments for applications and software in order to offload development and maintenance overhead to a third party. The database is no exception. Businesses are turning to using database as a service (DBaaS) to handle their data needs.

DBaaS provides some obvious benefits:

  • Offload physical infrastructure to another vendor. It is the responsibility of whoever is providing the DBaaS service to maintain the physical environment – including hardware, software and best practices.
  • Scalability. You can add or subtract capacity as needed by just contacting your vendor. Have a big event on the horizon? Order more servers!
  • Expense. Since you no longer have shell out for operational costs or infrastructure upgrades (all handled by the vendor now), you can reduce capital and operation expenses – or at least reasonably plan on what they are going to be.

There are some potential disadvantages to a DBaaS as well:

  • Network performance issues. If your database is located off-premises, then it can be subject to network issues (or outages) that are beyond your control. These can translate into performance problems that impact the customer experience.
  • Loss of visibility. It’s harder (though not impossible) to always know what is happening with your data. Decisions around provisioning, storage and architecture are now in the hands of a third party.
  • Security and compliance. You are no longer totally in control of how secure or compliant your data is when using a DBaaS. This can be crucial if your business requires certain standards to operate in your market (healthcare, for example).

How are you hosting your database? On-premises? In the cloud? Which cloud? Is it co-located? Please answer using the poll below. Choose up to three answers. If you don’t see your solutions, use the comments to explain.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

Thanks in advance for your responses – they will help the open source community determine how databases are being hosted.

Sep
15
2017
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Percona Blog Poll Results: What Database Engine Are You Using to Store Time Series Data?

TIme Series Data

TIme Series DataIn this blog post, we talk about the results of Percona’s time series database poll “What Database Engine Are You Using to Store Time Series Data?”

Time series data is some of the most actionable data available when it comes to analyzing trends and making predictions. Simply put, time series data is data that is indexed not just by value, but by time as well – allowing you to view value changes over time as they occur. Obvious uses include the stock market, web traffic, user behavior, etc.

With the increasing number of smart devices in the Internet of Things (IoT), being able to track data over time is more and more important. With time series data, you can measure and make predictions on things like energy consumption, pH values, water consumption, data from environment-aware machines like smart cars, etc. The sensors used in IoT devices and systems generate huge amounts of time-series data.

A couple of months back, we ran a poll on what time series databases were being used by the community. We wanted to quickly report on the results from that poll.

First the results:

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

Here are some thoughts:

  • The fact that this blog started as a place exclusively for MySQL information probably explains why we skewed high with MySQL respondents – still that doesn’t mean it doesn’t reflect reality.
  • Elastic seems the most common after that, possibly to tie in with MySQL use.
  • InfluxDB as next popular. This suggests that Paul Dix’s chosen business model is “AOK” so to speak. It is unclear if people use the open source version, or outgrow it and switch to the commercial stuff.
  • We lumped together “general purpose NoSQL engine”, but in some cases examples like Cassandra are targeted at time series. Notice that KairosDB, which is built on top of Cassandra itself, is not as popular in our survey.
  • Prometheus is the canonical “not a time series database”, but still used as one. I have a feeling alongside Graphite, this is monitoring related.
  • ClickHouse time series is a new time series database and it is surprising that it gets such high rankings. It was also relatively unknown outside of its home country Russia, but now we are seeing uses at places like CloudFlare and more.

Thanks for participating in the poll. We’re still running a poll on operating systems, so don’t forget to register your responses. We’ll report on that poll soon, with a new one on the way shortly.

Jul
19
2017
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Blog Poll: What Operating System Do You Run Your Development Database On?

Blog Poll

Blog PollIn this post, we’ll use a blog poll to find out what operating system you use to run your development database servers.

In our last blog poll, we looked at what OS you use for your production database. Now we would like to see what you use for your development database.

As databases grow to meet more challenges and expanding application demands, they must try and get the maximum amount of performance out of available resources. How they work with an operating system can affect many variables, and help or hinder performance. The operating system you use for your database can impact consumable choices (such as hardware and memory). The operating system you use can also impact your choice of database engine as well (or vice versa).

When new projects, new applications or services or testing new architecture solutions, it makes sense to create a development environment in order to test and run scenarios before they hit production. Do you use the same OS in your development environment as you do your production environment?

Please let us know what operating system you use to run your development database. For this blog poll, we’re asking which operating system you use to actually run your development database server (not the base operating system).

If you’re running virtualized Linux on Windows, please select Linux as the OS used for development. Pick up to three that apply. Add any thoughts or other options in the comments section:

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

Thanks in advance for your responses – they will help the open source community determine how database environments are being deployed.

Feb
16
2017
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Percona Blog Poll Results: What Programming Languages Are You Using for Backend Development?

Programming Languages

Programming LanguagesIn this blog we’ll look at the results from Percona’s blog poll on what programming languages you’re using for backend development.

Late last year we started a poll on what backend programming languages are being used by the open source community. The three components of the backend – server, application, and database – are what makes a website or application work. Below are the results of Percona’s poll on backend programming languages in use by the community:

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

One of the best-known and earliest web service stacks is the LAMP stack, which spelled out refers to Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP/Perl/Python. We can see that this early model is still popular when it comes to the backend.

PHP still remains a very common choice for a backend programming language, with Python moving up the list as well. Perl seems to be fading in popularity, despite being used a lot in the MySQL world.

Java is also showing signs of strength, demonstrating the strides MySQL is making in enterprise applications. We can also see JavaScript is increasingly getting used not only as a front-end programming language, but also as back-end language with the Node.JS framework.

Finally, Go is a language to look out for. Go is an open source programming language created by Google. It first appeared in 2009, and is already more popular than Perl or Ruby according to this poll.

Thanks to the community for participating in our poll. You can take our latest poll on what database engine are you using to store time series data here. 

Feb
10
2017
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Percona Blog Poll: What Database Engine Are You Using to Store Time Series Data?

TIme Series Data

TIme Series DataTake Percona’s blog poll on what database engine you are using to store time series data.

Time series data is some of the most actionable data available when it comes to analyzing trends and making predictions. Simply put, time series data is data that is indexed not just by value, but by time as well – allowing you to view value changes over time as they occur. Obvious uses include the stock market, web traffic, user behavior, etc.

With the increasing number of smart devices in the Internet of Things (IoT), being able to track data over time is more and more important. With time series data, you can measure and make predictions on things like energy consumption, pH values, water consumption, data from environment-aware machines like smart cars, etc. The sensors used in IoT devices and systems generate huge amounts of time-series data.

How is all of this data collected, segmented and stored? We’d like to hear from you: what database engine are you using to store time series data? Please take a few seconds and answer the following poll. Which are you using? Help the community learn what database engines help solve critical database issues. Please select from one to three database engines as they apply to your environment. Feel free to add comments below if your engine isn’t listed.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

Dec
21
2016
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Percona Blog Poll: What Programming Languages are You Using for Backend Development?

Programming Languages

Programming LanguagesTake Percona’s blog poll on what programming languages you’re using for backend development.

While customers and users focus and interact with applications and websites, these are really just the tip of the iceberg for the whole end-to-end system that allows applications to run. The backend is what makes a website or application work. The backend has three parts to it: server, application, and database. A backend operation can be a web application communicating with the server to make a change in a database stored on a server. Technologies like PHP, Ruby, Python, and others are the ones backend programmers use to make this communication work smoothly, allowing the customer to purchase his or her ticket with ease.

Backend programmers might not get a lot of credit, but they are the ones that design, maintain and repair the machinery that powers a system.

Please take a few seconds and answer the following poll on backend programming languages. Which are you using? Help the community learn what languages help solve critical database issues. Please select from one to six languages as they apply to your environment.

If you’re using other languages, or have specific issues, feel free to comment below. We’ll post a follow-up blog with the results!

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.
Dec
21
2016
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Percona Poll Results: What Database Technologies Are You Using?

Database TechnologiesThis blog shows the results from Percona’s poll on what database technologies our readers use in their environment.

We design different databases for different scenarios. Using one database technology for every situation doesn’t make sense, and can lead to non-optimal solutions for common issues. Big data and IoT applications, high availability, secure backups, security, cloud vs. on-premises deployment: each have a set of requirements that might need a special technology. Relational, document-based, key-value, graphical, column family – there are many options for many problems. More and more, database environments combine more than one solution to address the various needs of an enterprise or application (known as polyglot persistence).

The following are the results of our poll on database technologies:

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

We’ve concluded our database technology poll that looks at the technologies our readers are running in 2016. Thank you to the more than 1500 people who responded! Let’s look at what the poll results tell us, and how they compare to the similar poll we did in 2013.

Since the wording of the two poll questions is slightly different, the results won’t be directly comparable.  

First, let’s set the record straight: this poll does not try to be an unbiased, open source database technology poll. We understand our audience likely has many more MySQL and MongoDB users than other technologies. So we should look at the poll results as “how MySQL and MongoDB users look at open source database technology.”

It’s interesting to examine which technologies we chose to include in our 2016 poll, compared to the 2013 poll. The most drastic change can be seen in the full-text search technologies. This time, we decided not to include Lucene and Sphinx this time. ElasticSearch, which wasn’t included back in 2013, is now the leading full-text search technology. This corresponds to what we see among our customers.

The change between Redis versus Memcached is also interesting. Back in 2013, Memcached was the clear supporting technology winner. In 2016, Redis is well ahead.

We didn’t ask about PostgreSQL back in 2013 (few people probably ran PostgreSQL alongside MySQL then). Today our poll demonstrates its very strong showing.

We are also excited to see MongoDB’s strong ranking in the poll, which we interpret both as a result of the huge popularity of this technology and as recognition of our success as MongoDB support and services provider. We’ve been in the MongoDB solutions business for less than two years, and already seem to have a significant audience among MongoDB users.

In looking at other technologies mentioned, it is interesting to see that Couchbase and Riak were mentioned by fewer people than in 2013, while Cassandra came in about the same. I don’t necessarily see it as diminishing popularity for these technologies, but as potentially separate communities forming that don’t extensively cross-pollinate.

Kafka also deserves special recognition: with the initial release in January 2011, it gets a mention back in our 2013 poll. Our current poll shows it at 7%. This is a much larger number than might be expected, as Kafka is typically used in complicated, large-scale applications.

Thank you for participating!

Oct
26
2016
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Percona Poll: What Database Technologies Are You Using?

Database Technologies

Database TechnologiesTake Percona’s poll on what database technologies you use in your environment.

Different databases get designed for different scenarios. Using one database technology for every situation doesn’t make sense, and can lead to non-optimal solutions for common issues. Big data and IoT applications, high availability, secure backups, security, cloud vs. on-premises deployment: each have a set of requirements that might need a special technology. Relational, document-based, key-value, graphical, column family – there are many options for many problems. More and more, database environments combine more than one solution to address the various needs of an enterprise or application (known as polyglot persistence).

Please take a few seconds and answer the following poll on database technologies. Which are you using? Help the community learn what technologies critical database environments employ. Please select from one to six technologies as they apply to your environment.

If you’re using other solutions or have specific issues, feel free to comment below. We’ll post a follow-up blog with the results!

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

 

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