Mar
31
2020
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DataStax launches Kubernetes operator for open source Cassandra database

Today, DataStax, the commercial company behind the open source Apache Cassandra project, announced an open source Kubernetes operator developed by the company to run a cloud native version of the database.

When Sam Ramji, chief strategy officer at DataStax, came over from Google last year, the first thing he did was take the pulse of customers, partners and community members around Kubernetes and Cassandra, and they found there was surprisingly limited support.

While some companies had built Kubernetes support themselves, DataStax lacked one to call its own. Given that Kubernetes was born inside Google, and the company has widely embraced the notion of containerization in general, Ramji wanted there to be an operator specifically designed by the company to give customers a general starting point with Kubernetes.

“What’s special about the Kube operator that we’re offering to the community as an option — one of many — is that we have done the work to generalize the operator to Cassandra wherever it might be implemented,” Ramji told TechCrunch.

Ramji says that most companies that have created their own Kubernetes operators tend to specialize for their own particular requirements, which is fine, but as the company built on top of Cassandra, they wanted to come up with a general version that could appeal broader range of use cases.

In Kubernetes, the operator is how the DevOps team packages, manages and deploys an application, giving it the instructions it needs to run correctly. DataStax has created this operator specifically to run Cassandra with a broad set of assumptions.

Cassandra is a powerful database because it stays running when many others fall down. As such it is used by companies as varied as Apple, eBay and Netflix to run their key services. This new Kubernetes implementation will enable anyone who wishes to run Cassandra as a containerized application, helping push it into a modern development realm.

The company also announced a free help service for engineers trying to cope with increased usage on their databases due to COVID-19. They are calling the program, “Keep calm and Cassandra on.” The engineers charged with keeping systems like Cassandra running are called Site Reliability Engineers or SREs.

“The new service is completely free SRE-to-SRE support calls. So our SREs are taking calls from Apache Cassandra users anywhere in the world, no matter what version they’re using if they’re trying to figure out how to keep it up to stand up to the increased demand,” Ramji explained.

DataStax was founded in 2010 and has raised over $190 million, according to PitchBook data.

Mar
03
2020
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Datastax acquires The Last Pickle

Data management company Datastax, one of the largest contributors to the Apache Cassandra project, today announced that it has acquired The Last Pickle (and no, I don’t know what’s up with that name either), a New Zealand-based Cassandra consulting and services firm that’s behind a number of popular open-source tools for the distributed NoSQL database.

As Datastax Chief Strategy Officer Sam Ramji, who you may remember from his recent tenure at Apigee, the Cloud Foundry Foundation, Google and Autodesk, told me, The Last Pickle is one of the premier Apache Cassandra consulting and services companies. The team there has been building Cassandra-based open source solutions for the likes of Spotify, T Mobile and AT&T since it was founded back in 2012. And while The Last Pickle is based in New Zealand, the company has engineers all over the world that do the heavy lifting and help these companies successfully implement the Cassandra database technology.

It’s worth mentioning that Last Pickle CEO Aaron Morton first discovered Cassandra when he worked for WETA Digital on the special effects for Avatar, where the team used Cassandra to allow the VFX artists to store their data.

“There’s two parts to what they do,” Ramji explained. “One is the very visible consulting, which has led them to become world experts in the operation of Cassandra. So as we automate Cassandra and as we improve the operability of the project with enterprises, their embodied wisdom about how to operate and scale Apache Cassandra is as good as it gets — the best in the world.” And The Last Pickle’s experience in building systems with tens of thousands of nodes — and the challenges that its customers face — is something Datastax can then offer to its customers as well.

And Datastax, of course, also plans to productize The Last Pickle’s open-source tools like the automated repair tool Reaper and the Medusa backup and restore system.

As both Ramji and Datastax VP of Engineering Josh McKenzie stressed, Cassandra has seen a lot of commercial development in recent years, with the likes of AWS now offering a managed Cassandra service, for example, but there wasn’t all that much hype around the project anymore. But they argue that’s a good thing. Now that it is over ten years old, Cassandra has been battle-hardened. For the last ten years, Ramji argues, the industry tried to figure out what the de factor standard for scale-out computing should be. By 2019, it became clear that Kubernetes was the answer to that.

“This next decade is about what is the de facto standard for scale-out data? We think that’s got certain affordances, certain structural needs and we think that the decades that Cassandra has spent getting harden puts it in a position to be data for that wave.”

McKenzie also noted that Cassandra provides users with a number of built-in features like support for mutiple data centers and geo-replication, rolling updates and live scaling, as well as wide support across programming languages, give it a number of advantages over competing databases.

“It’s easy to forget how much Cassandra gives you for free just based on its architecture,” he said. “Losing the power in an entire datacenter, upgrading the version of the database, hardware failing every day? No problem. The cluster is 100 percent always still up and available. The tooling and expertise of The Last Pickle really help bring all this distributed and resilient power into the hands of the masses.”

The two companies did not disclose the price of the acquisition.

Apr
09
2019
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Google Cloud challenges AWS with new open-source integrations

Google today announced that it has partnered with a number of top open-source data management and analytics companies to integrate their products into its Google Cloud Platform and offer them as managed services operated by its partners. The partners here are Confluent, DataStax, Elastic, InfluxData, MongoDB, Neo4j and Redis Labs.

The idea here, Google says, is to provide users with a seamless user experience and the ability to easily leverage these open-source technologies in Google’s cloud. But there is a lot more at play here, even though Google never quite says so. That’s because Google’s move here is clearly meant to contrast its approach to open-source ecosystems with Amazon’s. It’s no secret that Amazon’s AWS cloud computing platform has a reputation for taking some of the best open-source projects and then forking those and packaging them up under its own brand, often without giving back to the original project. There are some signs that this is changing, but a number of companies have recently taken action and changed their open-source licenses to explicitly prevent this from happening.

That’s where things get interesting, because those companies include Confluent, Elastic, MongoDB, Neo4j and Redis Labs — and those are all partnering with Google on this new project, though it’s worth noting that InfluxData is not taking this new licensing approach and that while DataStax uses lots of open-source technologies, its focus is very much on its enterprise edition.

“As you are aware, there has been a lot of debate in the industry about the best way of delivering these open-source technologies as services in the cloud,” Manvinder Singh, the head of infrastructure partnerships at Google Cloud, said in a press briefing. “Given Google’s DNA and the belief that we have in the open-source model, which is demonstrated by projects like Kubernetes, TensorFlow, Go and so forth, we believe the right way to solve this it to work closely together with companies that have invested their resources in developing these open-source technologies.”

So while AWS takes these projects and then makes them its own, Google has decided to partner with these companies. While Google and its partners declined to comment on the financial arrangements behind these deals, chances are we’re talking about some degree of profit-sharing here.

“Each of the major cloud players is trying to differentiate what it brings to the table for customers, and while we have a strong partnership with Microsoft and Amazon, it’s nice to see that Google has chosen to deepen its partnership with Atlas instead of launching an imitation service,” Sahir Azam, the senior VP of Cloud Products at MongoDB told me. “MongoDB and GCP have been working closely together for years, dating back to the development of Atlas on GCP in early 2017. Over the past two years running Atlas on GCP, our joint teams have developed a strong working relationship and support model for supporting our customers’ mission critical applications.”

As for the actual functionality, the core principle here is that Google will deeply integrate these services into its Cloud Console; for example, similar to what Microsoft did with Databricks on Azure. These will be managed services and Google Cloud will handle the invoicing and the billings will count toward a user’s Google Cloud spending commitments. Support will also run through Google, so users can use a single service to manage and log tickets across all of these services.

Redis Labs CEO and co-founder Ofer Bengal echoed this. “Through this partnership, Redis Labs and Google Cloud are bringing these innovations to enterprise customers, while giving them the choice of where to run their workloads in the cloud, he said. “Customers now have the flexibility to develop applications with Redis Enterprise using the fully integrated managed services on GCP. This will include the ability to manage Redis Enterprise from the GCP console, provisioning, billing, support, and other deep integrations with GCP.”

Apr
21
2016
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Percona Live 2016: Day Three Keynote Talks

We’re heading into the final day here at Percona Live 2016! People are looking a little tired, but still excited for some excellent talks today. Once again the day started off with two great keynote lectures. Read to the end for an important announcement!

Percona Live 2016Peter Zaitsev, CEO of Percona
Winning with Open Source Databases

Peter discussed what makes the open source community so vibrant and powerful, and why it is essential to preserve that spirit. Data is critical to the success of your business. You rely on your database and its supporting systems to power the applications that drive your business. These systems must be reliable, scalable, efficient – and increasingly, open source. With the complexity of today’s web applications and the databases, systems and hardware that support them, organizations must use the right open source tools and technology for each job – without getting locked into a proprietary solution. With Percona, customers are assured a choice in technology options that are completely open source (and include enterprise features). We help our customers find the right technology for their specific needs, rather than sell a one-size-fits-all product. Percona is a true open source partner that helps you optimize your database performance to better run your business.

Percona Live 2016Patrick McFadin, Chief Evangelist at DataStax

Take back the power in your cloud applications with Apache Cassandra

Patrick discussed how cloud applications can help you to develop the applications you need in your business, but also outline why the cloud isn’t a panacea for every business issue. Database engineers have had to support the crazy dreams of application developers since the beginning of the internet. Patrick says it’s time to take back the power! He believes that Apache Cassandra is the tool that can help you eliminate downtime or span your data around the world with ease. Deploying to the cloud isn’t always easy, but Cassandra might be able to give your application developers the best chance they can get and sleep easy at night.

 

Post MongoDB World NY ShowPost MongoDB World New York Conference, June 30th, Hilton Mid-Town Manhattan

Peter also made an important announcement: Percona and ObjectRocket/Rackspace will be sponsoring a free post-MongoDB World Community Event! The event will take place on Thursday, June 30th at the Hilton Mid-Town Manhattan.

All are welcome.

Don’t miss out on this amazing opportunity to share ideas and get insights after MongoDB World.

Check out the rest of today’s Percona Live 2016 schedule here.

Apr
11
2016
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DataStax adds graph databases to enterprise Cassandra product set

Social network graph coming off a tablet. When DataStax acquired Aurelius, a graph database startup last year, it was clear it wanted to add graph database functionality to its DataStax Enterprise product, and today it achieved that goal when it announced the release of DataStax Enterprise Graph. The new enterprise graph product has been fully integrated into the DataStax Enterprise product set, giving customers an integrated… Read More

Feb
03
2015
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DataStax Grabs Aurelius In Graph Database Acqui-Hire

Graph made from US 100 dollar bill with arrow pointing up. DataStax scored a $106M funding pay day last September, and today it announced it was using some of that money to acquire open source graph database company, Aurelius, along with its engineering talent.
No terms were disclosed, but all eight Aurelius engineers will be joining DataStax immediately. The new team will begin working on what they are calling “a massively scalable graph… Read More

Sep
04
2014
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DataStax Lands $106M In Series E Funding

Database diagram DataStax, the commercial face of the open source Apache Cassandra database, announced $106M in Series E Funding, bringing their total to date to over $190M in funding. Today’s round was led by Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers with additional investors including ClearBridge, Cross Creek and Wasatch, PremjiInvest and Comcast Ventures. Existing investors including Lightspeed… Read More

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