Sep
14
2018
--

PostgreSQL Webinar Wed Oct 10th – Enterprise-Grade PostgreSQL: Built on Open Source Tools

Enterprise PostgreSQL built with open source tools

PostgreSQL® logoPlease join Percona’s PostgreSQL Support Technical Lead,  Avinash Vallarapu; Senior Support Engineer, Fernando Laudares; and Senior Support Engineer, Jobin Augustine, on Wednesday, October 10th, 2018 at 7:00 AM PDT (UTC-7) / 10:00 AM EDT (UTC-4), as they demonstrate an enterprise-grade PostgreSQL® environment built using a combination of open source tools and extensions.

“We built our application on top of PostgreSQL. It works great but only now that we took it to the market and it became a hit we realize how much it relies on the database. How can we “harden” PostgreSQL? How can we make the solution we built around PostgreSQL enterprise-grade?”

“I migrated from a proprietary database software to PostgreSQL. I am curious to know whether I can get the same features I used to have in the proprietary database software.”

You’ll find the answer to these questions and more in a series of blog posts we will be publishing on this topic, which will be followed by a live demo we planned for our webinar on October 10th, 2018.

The market coined the term “enterprise grade” or “enterprise ready” to differentiate products and service offerings for licensed database software. For example: there may be a standard database software or an entry-level package that delivers the core functionality and basic features. Likewise, there may be an enterprise version, a more advanced package which goes beyond the essentials to include features and tools indispensable for running critical solutions in production. With such a differentiation found in commercial software, we may wonder whether a solution built on top of an open source database like PostgreSQL can satisfy all the enterprise requirements.

It starts with building a secured PostgreSQL environment, tuning the database for the production workload, building a high availability strategy that avoids single-point-of-failures, scaling PostgreSQL using connection poolers to avoid excessive usage of server resources, and finally load balancing the reads between master and all the available standby servers aka replicas to effectively use the computing power of all the database servers.

The operational aspect of maintaining an enterprise grade PostgreSQL database also includes the methods to configure a backup strategy that helps us achieve point-in-time-recovery as needed, detailed logging and monitoring PostgreSQL along with a real-time analysis of the database performance and finally maintaining the database health with optimal performance, such as making sure vacuuming is working as it should and at the right times.

“Can we build such an enterprise grade solution that satisfies all the above requirements around PostgreSQL with open source softwares only?”

Yes, we can. During the 20+ years PostgreSQL has been around, the open source community has created all sorts of complementary extensions and tools that can be used to build an enterprise grade solution with postgres.

We’ll be following this post with a series of posts covering each piece of such solution, culminating with a webinar that will take place on October 10th. During the webinar we’ll showcase the full project. Here’s the list of topics we are going to consider while building our enterprise grade PostgreSQL server.

  1. Securing your PostgreSQL database cluster
  2. High Availability
  3. Preparing a Backup strategy and the tools available to achieve it
  4. Scaling PostgreSQL using connection poolers and load balancers
  5. Tools/extensions available for your daily DBA life and detailed logging in PostgreSQL.
  6. Monitoring your PostgreSQL and real-time analysis.

Join us to see it in action!

The post PostgreSQL Webinar Wed Oct 10th – Enterprise-Grade PostgreSQL: Built on Open Source Tools appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Mar
02
2017
--

Docker’s new enterprise edition gives containers an out-of-the-box experience

docker_whale_dockerconeu When it comes to implementing a system like Docker’s container platform, it normally takes a very particular set of technical skills. Docker wants to remove some of the complexity involved in running their product set, and to that end released Docker Enterprise Edition today. Think of the enterprise edition as a package of tools designed to work seamlessly across any supported flavor… Read More

Jun
25
2015
--

Oracle license revenue and the MySQL ecosystem

Oracle was in the news recently with the story of its license revenue declining as much as 17% in the recent quarter. This is blamed on transitioning to the cloud in some publications, but others, such as Bloomberg and TechRepublic, look deeper, seeing open source software responsible for the bulk of it.

Things are especially interesting in the MySQL ecosystem, as Oracle both owns its traditional “Enterprise” Oracle database and MySQL – a more modern open source database.

At Percona we see the same story repeating among many of our enterprise customers:

  1. MySQL proves itself. This generally happens one of two ways. One is for the enterprise using traditional enterprise databases, such as Oracle or DB2, to acquire a company which has been built on MySQL. After the dust settles the CFO or CIO discovers that the acquired company has been successfully running business-critical operations with MySQL and spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on database support instead of tens of millions. At this point it’s been shown that it can be done, so it should continue.

The other way is for MySQL to rise through the ranks in an organization. Typically it starts with some small MySQL use, such as running a bug tracking application in the IT department. Then it moves to MySQL being used with Drupal to power the main corporate website and an e-commerce function with Magento or something similar. Over time, MySQL proves itself and is trusted to handle more and more “core” enterprise databases that are absolutely critical for the business.

Interestingly enough, contrary to what some people have said, MySQL ownership by Oracle helps it to gain trust with many enterprise accounts. Enterprises may not like Oracle’s license and maintenance fees, but they like Oracle’s quality engineering, attention to security and predictable releases.

  1. New applications are built using MySQL. As the enterprise is ready to embrace MySQL it is added to the approved database list and now internal teams can use it to develop applications. In many cases the mandate goes even further with MySQL than with other open source technologies, as it is given preference, and teams need to really justify to management when they want to use Oracle or other proprietary database technologies. There are some cases when that may be warranted, but in most cases MySQL is good enough.

  1. Moving existing applications from Oracle to MySQL.  Depending on the organization and applications it can happen a couple of different ways. One is the equivalent applications are built from scratch on the new open source technology stack and the old application is retired. The other is only the database is migrated from Oracle to MySQL. Moving the database from Oracle to MySQL might be easy and might be close to a full application rewrite. For example, we see Java applications which often use the database as a simple data store through the ORM framework which can be moved to MySQL easily; on the other hand, applications built with extensive use of advanced stored procedures and Oracle-specific SQL extensions are much harder to move.

The wave of moving to open source database technologies will continue and we’re not alone in thinking that – Gartner believes that by 2018, 70% of new in-house applications will be built on open source database systems.

What are we currently seeing in the MySQL ecosystem? First, many customers tell us that they are looking at hefty price increases for MySQL support subscriptions. Some of the customers which had previously signed 5 year agreements with Sun (at the time it was acquired by Oracle) who are exploring renewing now, see price increases as much as 5x for a comparable environment. This is very understandable considering the pressures Oracle has on the market right now.

The issues, however, go deeper than the price. Many customers are not comfortable trusting Oracle to give them the best possible advice for moving from expensive Oracle to a much less expensive Oracle MySQL database. The conflicts are obvious when the highest financial reward comes to Oracle by proving applications can’t be moved to MySQL or any other open source database.

If you’re choosing MySQL, Oracle is financially interested in having you use the Enterprise Edition, which brings back many of the vendor lock-in issues enterprises are trying to avoid by moving to open source databases. Customers believe Oracle will ensure enterprise-only features are put in use in the applications, making it difficult to avoid renewing at escalating prices.

So what do our customers see in Percona which makes them prefer our support and other services to those of Oracle?

  • We are a great partner if you’re considering moving from the Oracle database to MySQL as we both have years of experience and no conflict of interest.
  • Percona Server, Percona XtraDB Cluster, Percona Xtrabackup and our other software for the MySQL ecosystem is 100% open source, which means we’re not trying to lock you into the “enterprise version” as we work together. Furthermore, many of the features which are only available in MySQL Enterprise Edition are available in the fully open source Percona Server, including audit, backup and authentication.
  • We are focused on solutions for your business, not pushing Percona-branded technology. If you choose to use Percona Server, great! If you are using MySQL, MariaDB, Amazon RDS, etc., that’s great too.

With the continuing trend of moving to open source database management systems the cost pressures on people running proprietary databases will continue to increase, and the only real solution is to accelerate moving to the open source stack. As you do that, you’re better off moving to completely open source technology, such as what is available from Percona, to avoid vendor lock-in. If you’re looking for the partner to help you to assess the migration strategy and execute the move successfully, check for conflicts of interests and ensure the interests of your and your provider are completely aligned.

The post Oracle license revenue and the MySQL ecosystem appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Powered by WordPress | Theme: Aeros 2.0 by TheBuckmaker.com