Jul
11
2018
--

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.6.5-1.3 Is Now Available

MongoRocks

Percona Server for MongoDBPercona announces the release of Percona Server for MongoDB 3.6.5-1.3 on July 11, 2018. Download the latest version from the Percona web site or the Percona Software Repositories.

Percona Server for MongoDB is an enhanced, open source, and highly-scalable database that is a fully-compatible, drop-in replacement for MongoDB 3.6 Community Edition. It supports MongoDB 3.6 protocols and drivers.

Percona Server for MongoDB extends MongoDB Community Edition functionality by including the Percona Memory Engine, as well as several enterprise-grade features. Percona Server for MongoDB requires no changes to MongoDB applications or code.

This release is based on MongoDB 3.6.5 and does not include any additional changes.

The Percona Server for MongoDB 3.6.5-1.3 release notes are available in the official documentation.

The post Percona Server for MongoDB 3.6.5-1.3 Is Now Available appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jul
09
2018
--

Percona Live Europe 2018 Call for Papers is Now Open

Percona Live Europe Open Source Database Conference PLE 2018

Percona Live Europe Open Source Database Conference PLE 2018Announcing the opening of the Percona Live Europe Open Source Database Conference 2018 in Frankfurt, Germany call for papers. It will be open from now until August 10, 2018.

Our theme this year is
Connect. Accelerate. Innovate.

As a speaker at Percona Live Europe, you’ll have the opportunity to CONNECT with your peers—open source database experts and enthusiasts who share your commitment to improving knowledge and exchanging ideas. ACCELERATE your projects and career by presenting at the premier open source database event, a great way to build your personal and company brands. And influence the evolution of the open source software movement by demonstrating how you INNOVATE!

Community initiatives remain core to the open source ethos, and we are proud of the contribution we make with Percona Live Europe in showcasing thought leading practices in the open source database world.

With a nod to innovation, for the first time, this year we are introducing a business track to benefit those business leaders who are exploring the use of open source and are interested in learning more about its costs and benefits.

Speaking Opportunities

The Percona Live Europe Open Source Database Conference 2018 Call for Papers is open until August 10, 2018. We invite you to submit your speaking proposal for breakout, tutorial or lightning talk sessions. Classes and talks are invited for Foundation (either entry level or of general interest to all), Core (intermediate) and Masterclass (advanced) levels.

If selected, you will receive a complimentary full conference pass.

  • Breakout Session. Broadly cover a technology area using specific examples. Sessions should be either 25 minutes or 50 minutes in length (including Q&A).
  • Tutorial Session. Present a technical session that aims for a level between a training class and a conference breakout session. We encourage attendees to bring and use laptops for working on detailed and hands-on presentations. Tutorials will be three or six hours in length (including Q&A).
  • Lightning Talk. Give a five-minute presentation focusing on one key point that interests the open source community: technical, lighthearted or entertaining talks on new ideas, a successful project, a cautionary story, a quick tip or demonstration.

Topics and Tracks

We want proposals that cover the many aspects of application development using all open source databases, as well as new and interesting ways to monitor and manage database environments. Did you just embrace open source databases this year? What are the technical and business values of moving to or using open source databases? How did you convince your company to make the move? Was there tangible ROI?

Best practices and current trends, including design, application development, performance optimization, HA and clustering, cloud, containers and new technologies, as well as new and interesting ways to monitor and manage database environments—what’s holding your focus? Share your case studies, experiences and technical knowledge with an engaged audience of open source peers.

In the submission entry you will be asked to indicate which of these tracks your proposal best fits: tutorial, business needs; case studies/use cases; operations; or developer.

A few ideas

The conference committee is looking for proposals that cover the many aspects of using, deploying and managing open source databases, including:

  • Open source – Describe the technical and business values of moving to or using open source databases. How did you convince your company to make the move? Was there tangible ROI?
  • Security – All of us have experienced security challenges. Whether they are initiated by legislature (GDPR), bugs (Meltdown/Spectre), experience (external attacks) or due diligence (planning for the worst), when do you have ‘enough’ security? Are you finding that security requirements are preventing your ability to be agile?
  • Serverless, Cloud or On-Premise – The technology landscape is no longer a simple one, and mixing infrastructures has almost become the norm. Are you designing data architectures for the new landscape, and eager to share your experience? Have microservices become an important part of your plans?
  • MySQL – Do you have an opinion on what is new and exciting in MySQL? With the release of MySQL 8.0, are you using the latest features? How and why? Are they helping you solve any business issues, or making deployment of applications and websites easier, faster or more efficient? Did the new release get you to change to MySQL? What do you see as the biggest impact of the MySQL 8.0 release? Do you use MySQL in conjunction with other databases in your environment?
  • MongoDB – How has the 3.6 release improved your experience in application development or time-to-market? How are the new features making your database environment better? What is it about MongoDB 4.0 that excites you? What are your experiences with Atlas? Have you moved to it, and has it lived up to its promises? Do you use MongoDB in conjunction with other databases in your environment?
  • PostgreSQL – Why do you use PostgreSQL as opposed to other SQL options? Have you done a comparison or benchmark of PostgreSQL vs. other types of databases related to your tasks? Why and what were the results? How does PostgreSQL help you with application performance or deployment? How do you use PostgreSQL in conjunction with other databases in your environment?
  • SQL, NewSQL, NoSQL – It’s become a perennial question without an easy answer. How do databases compare, how do you choose the right technology for the job, how do you trade off between features and their benefits in comparing databases? If you have ever tried a hybrid database approach in a single application, how did that work out? How nicely does MongoDB play with MySQL in the real world? Do you have anything to say about using SQL with NoSQL databases?
  • High Availability – What choices are you making to ensure high availability? How do you find the balance between redundancy and cost? Are you using hot backups, and if so, what happened when you needed to rollback on them?
  • Scalability – When did you recognize you needed to address data scale? Did your data growth take you by surprise or were you always in control? Did it take a degradation in performance to get your management to sit up and take notice? How do you plan for scale if you can’t predict demand?
  • What the Future Holds – What do you see as the “next big thing”? What new and exciting features are going to be released? What’s in your next release? What new technologies will affect the database landscape? AI? Machine learning? Blockchain databases? Let us know about innovations you see on the way.

How to respond to the call for papers

For information on how to submit your proposal visit our call for papers page. The conference web pages will be updated throughout the next few weeks and bios, synopsis and slides will be published on those pages after the event.

Sponsorship

If you would like to obtain a sponsor pack for Percona Live Europe Open Source Database Conference 2018, you will find more information including a prospectus on our sponsorship page. You are welcome to contact me, Bronwyn Campbell, directly.

The post Percona Live Europe 2018 Call for Papers is Now Open appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jul
06
2018
--

Percona Toolkit 3.0.11 Is Now Available

percona toolkit

percona toolkitPercona announces the release of Percona Toolkit 3.0.11 on July 6, 2018.

Percona Toolkit is a collection of advanced open source command-line tools, developed and used by the Percona technical staff, that are engineered to perform a variety of MySQL®, MongoDB® and system tasks that are too difficult or complex to perform manually. With over 1,000,000 downloads, Percona Toolkit supports Percona Server for MySQL, MySQL®, MariaDB®, Percona Server for MongoDB and MongoDB.

Percona Toolkit, like all Percona software, is free and open source. You can download packages from the website or install from official repositories.

This release includes the following changes:

New Features:

  • PT-1571: Improved hostname recognition in pt-secure-collect
  • PT-1569: Disabled --alter-foreign-keys-method=drop_swap in pt-online-schema-change
  • PT-242: (pt-stalk) Include SHOW SLAVE STATUS on MySQL 5.7 (Thanks Marcelo Altmann)

Fixed bugs:

  • PT-1570: pt-archiver fails to detect columns with the word *GENERATED* as part of the comment
  • PT-1563: pt-show-grantsfails for MySQL 5.6 producing an error which reports that an unknown column account_locked has been detected.
  • PT-1551: pt-table-checksum fails on MySQL 8.0.11
  • PT-241: (pt-stalk) Slave queries don’t run on MySQL 5.7  because the FQDN was missing (Thanks Marcelo Altmann)

Breaking changes:

Starting with this version, the queries checksum in pt-query-digest will use the full MD5 field as a CHAR(32) field instead of storing just the least significant bytes of the checksum as a BIGINT field. The reason for this change is that storing only the least significant bytes as a BIGINT was producing inconsistent results in MySQL 8 compared to MySQL 5.6+.

pt-online-schema-change in MySQL 8:

Due to a bug in MySQL 8.0+, it is not possible to use the drop_swapmethod to rebuild constraints because renaming a table will result in losing the foreign keys. You must specify a different method explicitly.

Help us improve our software quality by reporting any bugs you encounter using our bug tracking system.

The post Percona Toolkit 3.0.11 Is Now Available appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
29
2018
--

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.22-29.26 Is Now Available

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6Percona announces the release of Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.22-29.26 (PXC) on June 29, 2018. Binaries are available from the downloads section or our software repositories.

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.22-29.26 is now the current release, based on the following:

Deprecated

The following variables are deprecated starting from this release:

  • wsrep-force-binlog-format
  • wsrep_sst_method = mysqldump

As long as the use of binlog_format=ROW is enforced in 5.7, wsrep_forced_binlog_format variable is much less significant. The same is related to mysqldump, as xtrabackup is now the recommended SST method.

New features

  • PXC-907: New variable wsrep_RSU_commit_timeout allows to configure RSU wait for active commit connection timeout (in microseconds).
  • Percona XtraDB Cluster now supports the keyring_vault plugin, which allows to store the master key in a vault server.
  • Percona XtraDB Cluster  5.7.22 depends on Percona XtraBackup  2.4.12 in order to fully support vault plugin functionality.

Fixed Bugs

  • PXC-2127: Percona XtraDB Cluster shutdown process hung if thread_handling option was set to pool-of-threads due to a regression in  5.7.21.
  • PXC-2128: Duplicated auto-increment values were set for the concurrent sessions on cluster reconfiguration due to the erroneous readjustment.
  • PXC-2059: Error message about the necessity of the SUPER privilege appearing in case of the CREATE TRIGGER statements fail due to enabled WSREP was made more clear.
  • PXC-2061: Wrong values could be read, depending on timing, when read causality was enforced with wsrep_sync_wait=1, because of waiting on the commit monitor to be flushed instead of waiting on the apply monitor.
  • PXC-2073CREATE TABLE AS SELECT statement was not replicated in case if result set was empty.
  • PXC-2087: Cluster was entering the deadlock state if table had an unique key and INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE statement was executed.
  • PXC-2091: Check for the maximum number of rows, that can be replicated as a part of a single transaction because of the Galera limit, was enforced even when replication was disabled with wsrep_on=OFF.
  • PXC-2103: Interruption of the local running transaction in a COMMIT state by a replicated background transaction while waiting for the binlog backup protection caused the commit fail and, eventually, an assert in Galera.
  • PXC-2130: Percona XtraDB Cluster failed to build with Python 3.
  • PXC-2142: Replacing Percona Server with Percona XtraDB Cluster on CentOS 7 with the yum swap command produced a broken symlink in place of the /etc/my.cnf configuration file.
  • PXC-2154: rsync SST is now aborted with error message if used onnode with keyring_vault plugin configured, because it doesn’t support  keyring_vault. Also Percona doesn’t recommend using rsync-based SST for data-at-rest encryption with keyring.
  •  PXB-1544: xtrabackup --copy-back didn’t read which encryption plugin to use from plugin-load setting of the my.cnf configuration file.
  •  PXB-1540: Meeting a zero sized keyring file, Percona XtraBackup was removing and immediately recreating it, and this could affect external software noticing the file had undergo some manipulations.

Other bugs fixed:

PXC-2072 “flush table <table> for export should be blocked with mode=ENFORCING”.

Help us improve our software quality by reporting any bugs you encounter using our bug tracking system. As always, thanks for your continued support of Percona!

The post Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7.22-29.26 Is Now Available appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
27
2018
--

Percona Monitoring and Management 1.12.0 Is Now Available

Percona Monitoring and Management

Percona Monitoring and ManagementPMM (Percona Monitoring and Management) is a free and open-source platform for managing and monitoring MySQL and MongoDB performance. You can run PMM in your own environment for maximum security and reliability. It provides thorough time-based analysis for MySQL and MongoDB servers to ensure that your data works as efficiently as possible.

In release 1.12, we invested our efforts in the following areas:

  • Visual Explain in Query Analytics – Gain insight into MySQL’s query optimizer for your queries
  • New Dashboard – InnoDB Compression Metrics – Evaluate effectiveness of InnoDB Compression
  • New Dashboard – MySQL Command/Handler Compare – Contrast MySQL instances side by side
  • Updated Grafana to 5.1 – Fixed scrolling issues

We addressed 10 new features and improvements, and fixed 13 bugs.

Visual Explain in Query Analytics

We’re working on substantial changes to Query Analytics and the first part to roll out is something that users of Percona Toolkit may recognize – we’ve introduced a new element called Visual Explain based on pt-visual-explain.  This functionality transforms MySQL EXPLAIN output into a left-deep tree representation of a query plan, in order to mimic how the plan is represented inside MySQL.  This is of primary benefit when investigating tables that are joined in some logical way so that you can understand in what order the loops are executed by the MySQL query optimizer. In this example we are demonstrating the output of a single table lookup vs two table join:

Single Table Lookup Two Tables via INNER JOIN
SELECT DISTINCT c
FROM sbtest13
WHERE id
BETWEEN 49808
AND 49907
ORDER BY c
SELECT sbtest3.c
FROM sbtest1
INNER JOIN sbtest3
ON sbtest1.id = sbtest3.id
WHERE sbtest3.c ='long-string';

InnoDB Compression Metrics Dashboard

A great feature of MySQL’s InnoDB storage engine includes compression of data that is transparently handled by the database, saving you space on disk, while reducing the amount of I/O to disk as fewer disk blocks are required to store the same amount of data, thus allowing you to reduce your storage costs.  We’ve deployed a new dashboard that helps you understand the most important characteristics of InnoDB’s Compression.  Here’s a sample of visualizing Compression and Decompression attempts, alongside the overall Compression Success Ratio graph:

 

MySQL Command/Handler Compare Dashboard

We have introduced a new dashboard that lets you do side-by-side comparison of Command (Com_*) and Handler statistics.  A common use case would be to compare servers that share a similar workload, for example across MySQL instances in a pool of replicated slaves.  In this example I am comparing two servers under identical sysbench load, but exhibiting slightly different performance characteristics:

The number of servers you can select for comparison is unbounded, but depending on the screen resolution you might want to limit to 3 at a time for a 1080 screen size.

New Features & Improvements

  • PMM-2519: Display Visual Explain in Query Analytics
  • PMM-2019: Add new Dashboard InnoDB Compression metrics
  • PMM-2154: Add new Dashboard Compare Commands and Handler statistics
  • PMM-2530: Add timeout flags to mongodb_exporter (thank you unguiculus for your contribution!)
  • PMM-2569: Update the MySQL Golang driver for MySQL 8 compatibility
  • PMM-2561: Update to Grafana 5.1.3
  • PMM-2465: Improve pmm-admin debug output
  • PMM-2520: Explain Missing Charts from MySQL Dashboards
  • PMM-2119: Improve Query Analytics messaging when Host = All is passed
  • PMM-1956: Implement connection checking in mongodb_exporter

Bug Fixes

  • PMM-1704: Unable to connect to AtlasDB MongoDB
  • PMM-1950: pmm-admin (mongodb:metrics) doesn’t work well with SSL secured mongodb server
  • PMM-2134: rds_exporter exports memory in Kb with node_exporter labels which are in bytes
  • PMM-2157: Cannot connect to MongoDB using URI style
  • PMM-2175: Grafana singlestat doesn’t use consistent colour when unit is of type Time
  • PMM-2474: Data resolution on Dashboards became 15sec interval instead of 1sec
  • PMM-2581: Improve Travis CI tests by addressing pmm-admin check-network Time Drift
  • PMM-2582: Unable to scroll on “_PMM Add Instance” page when many RDS instances exist in an AWS account
  • PMM-2596: Set fixed height for panel content in PMM Add Instances
  • PMM-2600: InnoDB Checkpoint Age does not show data for MySQL
  • PMM-2620: Fix balancerIsEnabled & balancerChunksBalanced values
  • PMM-2634: pmm-admin cannot create user for MySQL 8
  • PMM-2635: Improve error message while adding metrics beyond “exit status 1”

Known Issues

  • PMM-2639: mysql:metrics does not work on Ubuntu 18.04 – We will address this in a subsequent release

How to get PMM Server

PMM is available for installation using three methods:

The post Percona Monitoring and Management 1.12.0 Is Now Available appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
25
2018
--

Percona XtraBackup 2.4.12 Is Now Available

Percona_XtraBackup

Percona XtraBackupPercona announces the GA release of Percona XtraBackup 2.4.12 on June 22, 2018. You can download it from our download site and apt and yum repositories.

Percona XtraBackup enables MySQL backups without blocking user queries, making it ideal for companies with large data sets and mission-critical applications that cannot tolerate long periods of downtime. Offered free as an open source solution, it drives down backup costs while providing unique features for MySQL backups.

New features and improvements:

  • Percona XtraBackup now prints used arguments to standard output. Bug fixed PXB-1494.

Bugs fixed

  • xtrabackup --copy-back didn’t read which encryption plugin to use from plugin-load setting of the my.cnf configuration file. Bug fixed PXB-1544.
  • xbstream was exiting with zero return code when it failed to create one or more target files instead of returning error code 1. Bug fixed PXB-1542.
  • Meeting a zero sized keyring file, Percona XtraBackup was removing and immediately recreating it, which could affect external software noticing this file had undergo manipulations. Bug fixed PXB-1540.
  • xtrabackup_checkpoints files were encrypted during a backup, which caused additional difficulties to take incremental backups. Bug fixed PXB-202.

Other bugs fixed: PXB-1526 “Test kill_long_selects.sh failing with MySQL 5.7.21”.

Release notes with all the improvements for version 2.4.12 are available in our online documentation. Please report any bugs to the issue tracker.

The post Percona XtraBackup 2.4.12 Is Now Available appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
20
2018
--

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4.15-2.13 Is Now Available

MongoRocks

Percona Server for MongoDB 3.2Percona announces the release of Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4.15-2.13 on June 20, 2018. Download the latest version from the Percona web site or the Percona Software Repositories.

Percona Server for MongoDB is an enhanced, open source, and highly-scalable database that is a fully-compatible, drop-in replacement for MongoDB 3.4 Community Edition. It supports MongoDB 3.4 protocols and drivers.

Percona Server for MongoDB extends MongoDB Community Edition functionality by including the Percona Memory Engine and MongoRocks storage engine, as well as several enterprise-grade features. It requires no changes to MongoDB applications or code.

This release is based on MongoDB 3.4.15 and does not include any additional changes.

The Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4.15-2.13 release notes are available in the official documentation.

The post Percona Server for MongoDB 3.4.15-2.13 Is Now Available appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
20
2018
--

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6.40-26.25 Is Now Available

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.7

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6Percona announces the release of Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6.40-26.25 (PXC) on June 20, 2018. Binaries are available from the downloads section or our software repositories.

Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6.40-26.25 is now the current release, based on the following:

All Percona software is open-source and free.

New feature

  • PXC-907: New variable wsrep_RSU_commit_timeout allows to configure RSU wait for active commit connection timeout (in microseconds).

Fixed Bugs

  • PXC-2128: Duplicated auto-increment values were set for the concurrent sessions on cluster reconfiguration due to the erroneous readjustment.
  • PXC-2059: Error message about the necessity of the SUPER privilege appearing in case of the CREATE TRIGGER statements fail due to enabled WSREP was made more clear.
  • PXC-2091: Check for the maximum number of rows, that can be replicated as a part of a single transaction because of the Galera limit, was enforced even when replication was disabled with wsrep_on=OFF.
  • PXC-2103: Interruption of the local running transaction in a COMMIT state by a replicated background transaction while waiting for the binlog backup protection caused the commit fail and, eventually, an assert in Galera.
  • PXC-2130Percona XtraDB Cluster failed to build with Python 3.

Help us improve our software quality by reporting any bugs you encounter using our bug tracking system. As always, thanks for your continued support of Percona!

The post Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6.40-26.25 Is Now Available appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
18
2018
--

Percona Database Performance Blog Commenting Issues

Percona Database Performance Blog Comments

We are experiencing an intermittent commenting problem on the Percona Database Performance Blog.

At Percona, part of our purpose is to engage with the open source database community. A big part of this engagement is the Percona Database Performance Blog, and the participation of the community in reading and commenting. We appreciate your interest and contributions.

Currently, we are experiencing an intermittent problem with comments on the blog. Some users are unable to post comments and can receive an error message similar to the following:

Percona Blog Error MsgWe are working on correcting the issue, and apologize if it affects you. If you have a comment that you want to make on a specific blog and this issue affects you, you can also leave comments on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn – all blog posts are socialized on those platforms.

Thanks for your patience.

The post Percona Database Performance Blog Commenting Issues appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
15
2018
--

This Week in Data with Colin Charles 42: Security Focus on Redis and Docker a Timely Reminder to Stay Alert

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

Much of last week, there was a lot of talk around this article: New research shows 75% of ‘open’ Redis servers infected. It turns out, it helps that one should always read beyond the headlines because they tend to be more sensationalist than you would expect. From the author of Redis, I highly recommend reading Clarifications on the Incapsula Redis security report, because it turns out that in this case, it is beyond the headline. The content is also suspect. Antirez had to write this to help the press (we totally need to help keep reportage accurate).

Not to depart from the Redis world just yet, but Antirez also had some collaboration with the Apple Information Security Team with regards to the Redis Lua subsystem. The details are pretty interesting as documented in Redis Lua scripting: several security vulnerabilities fixed because you’ll note that the Alibaba team also found some other issues. Antirez also ensured that the Redis cloud providers (notably: Redis Labs, Amazon, Alibaba, Microsoft, Google, Heroku, Open Redis and Redis Green) got notified first (and in the comments, compose.io was missing, but now added to the list). I do not know if Linux distributions were also informed, but they will probably be rolling out updates soon.

In the “be careful where you get your software” department: some criminals have figured out they could host some crypto-currency mining software that you would get pre-installed if you used their Docker containers. They’ve apparently made over $90,000. It is good to note that the Backdoored images downloaded 5 million times finally removed from Docker Hub. This, however, was up on the Docker Hub for ten months and they managed to get over 5 million downloads across 17 images. Know what images you are pulling. Maybe this is again more reason for software providers to run their own registries?

James Turnbull is out with a new book: Monitoring with Prometheus. It just got released, I’ve grabbed it, but a review will come shortly. He’s managed all this while pulling off what seems to be yet another great O’Reilly Velocity San Jose Conference.

Releases

A quiet week on this front.

Link List

  • INPLACE upgrade from MySQL 5.7 to MySQL 8.0
  • PostgreSQL relevant: What’s is the difference between streaming replication vs hot standby vs warm standby ?
  • A new paper on Amazon Aurora is out: Amazon Aurora: On Avoiding Distributed Consensus for I/Os, Commits, and Membership Changes. It was presented at SIGMOD 2018, and an abstract: “One of the more novel differences between Aurora and other relational databases is how it pushes redo processing to a multi-tenant scale-out storage service, purpose-built for Aurora. Doing so reduces networking traffic, avoids checkpoints and crash recovery, enables failovers to replicas without loss of data, and enables fault-tolerant storage that heals without database involvement. Traditional implementations that leverage distributed storage would use distributed consensus algorithms for commits, reads, replication, and membership changes and amplify cost of underlying storage.” Aurora, as you know, avoids distributed consensus under most circumstances. Short 8-page read.
  • Dormando is blogging again, and this was of particular interest — Caching beyond RAM: the case for NVMe. This is done in the context of memcached, which I am certain many use.
  • It is particularly heartening to note that not only does MongoDB use Linkbench for some of their performance testing, they’re also contributing to making it better via a pull request.

Industry Updates

Trying something new here… To cover fundraising, and people on the move in the database industry.

  • Kenny Gorman — who has been on the program committee for several Percona Live conferences, and spoken at the event multiple times before — is the founder and CEO of Eventador, a stream-processing as a service company built on Apache Kafka and Apache Flink, has just raised $3.8 million in funding to fuel their growth. They are also naturally spending this on hiring. The full press release.
  • Jimmy Guerrero (formerly of MySQL and InfluxDB) is now VP Marketing & Community at YugaByte DB. YugaByte was covered in column 13 as having raised $8 million in November 2017.

Upcoming appearances

  • DataOps Barcelona – Barcelona, Spain – June 21-22, 2018 – code dataopsbcn50 gets you a discount
  • OSCON – Portland, Oregon, USA – July 16-19, 2018
  • Percona webinar on Maria Server 10.3 – June 26, 2018

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

The post This Week in Data with Colin Charles 42: Security Focus on Redis and Docker a Timely Reminder to Stay Alert appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

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