Jul
06
2018
--

Percona Toolkit 3.0.11 Is Now Available

percona toolkit

percona toolkitPercona announces the release of Percona Toolkit 3.0.11 on July 6, 2018.

Percona Toolkit is a collection of advanced open source command-line tools, developed and used by the Percona technical staff, that are engineered to perform a variety of MySQL®, MongoDB® and system tasks that are too difficult or complex to perform manually. With over 1,000,000 downloads, Percona Toolkit supports Percona Server for MySQL, MySQL®, MariaDB®, Percona Server for MongoDB and MongoDB.

Percona Toolkit, like all Percona software, is free and open source. You can download packages from the website or install from official repositories.

This release includes the following changes:

New Features:

  • PT-1571: Improved hostname recognition in pt-secure-collect
  • PT-1569: Disabled --alter-foreign-keys-method=drop_swap in pt-online-schema-change
  • PT-242: (pt-stalk) Include SHOW SLAVE STATUS on MySQL 5.7 (Thanks Marcelo Altmann)

Fixed bugs:

  • PT-1570: pt-archiver fails to detect columns with the word *GENERATED* as part of the comment
  • PT-1563: pt-show-grantsfails for MySQL 5.6 producing an error which reports that an unknown column account_locked has been detected.
  • PT-1551: pt-table-checksum fails on MySQL 8.0.11
  • PT-241: (pt-stalk) Slave queries don’t run on MySQL 5.7  because the FQDN was missing (Thanks Marcelo Altmann)

Breaking changes:

Starting with this version, the queries checksum in pt-query-digest will use the full MD5 field as a CHAR(32) field instead of storing just the least significant bytes of the checksum as a BIGINT field. The reason for this change is that storing only the least significant bytes as a BIGINT was producing inconsistent results in MySQL 8 compared to MySQL 5.6+.

pt-online-schema-change in MySQL 8:

Due to a bug in MySQL 8.0+, it is not possible to use the drop_swapmethod to rebuild constraints because renaming a table will result in losing the foreign keys. You must specify a different method explicitly.

Help us improve our software quality by reporting any bugs you encounter using our bug tracking system.

The post Percona Toolkit 3.0.11 Is Now Available appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
29
2018
--

This Week in Data with Colin Charles 44: MongoDB 4.0 and Facebook MyRocks

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

There have been two big pieces of news this week: the release of MongoDB 4.0 and the fact that Facebook has migrated the Messenger backend over to MyRocks.

MongoDB 4.0 is stable, with support for multi-document ACID transactions. I quite like the engineering chalk and talks videos on the transactions page. There are also improvements to help manage your MongoDB workloads in a Kubernetes cluster. MongoDB Atlas supports global clusters (geographically distributed databases, low latency writes, and data placement controls for regulatory compliance), HIPAA compliance, and more. ZDNet calls it the “operational database that is developer friendly”. The TechCrunch take was more focused on MongoDB Atlas, MongoDB launches Global Clusters to put geographic data control within reach of anyone.

In addition to that, I found this little snippet on CNBC featuring Michael Gordon, MongoDB CFO, very interesting: last quarter MongoDB Inc reported 53% year-over-year growth in their subscription revenue business. The fastest-growing piece of the business? Cloud-hosted database as a service offering. They partner with Amazon, Google and Microsoft. They are looking to grow in the Chinese market.

Did you attend MongoDB World 2018? I personally can’t wait to see the presentations. Do not forget to read the MongoDB 4.0 release notes in the manual. Take heed of this important note: “In most cases, multi-document transaction incurs a greater performance cost over single document writes, and the availability of multi-document transaction should not be a replacement for effective schema design.”

As for Facebook Messenger migrating to MyRocks, this blog post is highly detailed: Migrating Messenger storage to optimize performance. This is a migration from the previous HBase backend to MyRocks. End users should notice a more responsive product and better search. For Facebook, storage consumption went down by 90%! The migration methodology to ensure Messenger usage was not disrupted for end users is also worth paying attention to. A more personal note from Yoshinori Matsunobu, as MyRocks is something he’s been spearheading. Don’t forget that you can try out MyRocks in Percona Server for MySQL as well as in MariaDB Server 10.2 and 10.3. To use Zstandard (or zstd for short), Percona Server for MySQL supports this (MariaDB does not, but has varying other compression algorithms).

Have you seen the Percona Open Source Database Community Blog? Jean-François Gagné recently wrote about how he posted on the Community Blog (so a very nice behind the scenes kind of post), and I hope you also read A Nice Feature in MariaDB 10.3: No InnoDB Buffer Pool in Core Dumps. Don’t forget to add this new blog to your RSS feed readers.

Lastly, as a quick note, there will unlikely be a column next week. I’m taking a short vacation, so see you in the following week!

Releases

Link List

Industry Updates

  • Louis Fahrberger (formerly of Clustrix, MariaDB Corporation, InfoBright and MySQL) is now an Account Executive in Sales for MemSQL.
  • The Wall Street Journal reports on Oracle Cloud and how the business continues to grow. “Revenues from its cloud services businesses jumped 25% year over year to $1.7 billion for its fiscal fourth quarter that ended May 31”.
  • The Financial Times reports on Red Hat sinks as currency swings cloud full-year sales outlook. The CFO, Eric Shander said, “we continue to expect strong demand for our hybrid cloud enabling technologies”.

Upcoming appearances

  • OSCON – Portland, Oregon, USA – July 16-19 2018

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

The post This Week in Data with Colin Charles 44: MongoDB 4.0 and Facebook MyRocks appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
27
2018
--

Webinar 6/28: Securing Database Servers From External Attacks

securing database servers

securing database serversPlease join Percona’s Chief Evangelist Colin Charles on Thursday, June 28th, 2018, as he presents Securing Database Servers From External attacks at 7:00 AM PDT (UTC-7) / 10:00 AM EDT (UTC-4).

 

A critical piece of your infrastructure is the database tier, yet people don’t pay enough attention to it judging by how many are bitten via poorly chosen defaults, or just a lack understanding of running a secure database tier. In this talk, I’ll focus on MySQL/MariaDB, PostgreSQL, and MongoDB, and cover external authentication, auditing, encryption, SSL, firewalls, replication, and more gems from over a decade of consulting in this space from Percona’s 4,000+ customers.

Register Now

 

Colin Charles

Chief Evangelist

Colin Charles is the Chief Evangelist at Percona. He was previously on the founding team of MariaDB Server in 2009, and had worked at MySQL since 2005, and been a MySQL user since 2000. Before joining MySQL, he worked actively on the Fedora and OpenOffice.org projects. He’s well known within open source communities in APAC, and has spoken at many conferences. Experienced technologist, well known in the open source world for work that spans nearly two decades within the community. Pays attention to emerging technologies from an integration standpoint. Prolific speaker at many industry-wide conferences delivering talks and tutorials with ease. Interests: application development, systems administration, database development, migration, Web-based technologies. Considered expert in Linux and Mac OS X usage/administration/roll-out’s. Specialties: MariaDB, MySQL, Linux, Open Source, Community, speaking & writing to technical audiences as well as business stakeholders.

The post Webinar 6/28: Securing Database Servers From External Attacks appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
26
2018
--

Webinar 6/27: MySQL Troubleshooting Best Practices: Monitoring the Production Database Without Killing Performance

performance troubleshooting MySQL monitoring tools

performance troubleshooting MySQL monitoring toolsPlease join Percona’s Principal Support Escalation Specialist Sveta Smirnova as she presents Troubleshooting Best Practices: Monitoring the Production Database Without Killing Performance on Wednesday, June 27th at 11:00 AM PDT (UTC-7) / 2:00 PM EDT (UTC-4).

 

During the MySQL Troubleshooting webinar series, I covered many monitoring and logging tools such as:

  • General, slow, audit, binary, error log files
  • Performance Schema
  • Information Schema
  • System variables
  • Linux utilities
  • InnoDB monitors
  • PMM

However, I did not spend much time on the impact these instruments have on overall MySQL performance. And they do have an impact.

And this is the conflict many people face. MySQL Server users try exploring these monitoring instruments, see that they slow down their installations, and turn them off. This is unfortunate. If the instrument that can help you resolve a problem is OFF, you won’t have good and necessary information to help understand when, how and why the issue occurred. In the best case, you’ll re-enable instrumentation and wait for the next disaster occurrence. In the worst case, you try various fix options without any real knowledge if they solve the problem or not.

This is why it is important to understand the impact monitoring tools have on your database, and therefore how to minimize it.

Understanding and controlling the impact of MySQL monitoring tools

In this webinar, I cover why certain monitoring tools affect performance, and how to minimize the impact without turning the instrument off. You will learn how to monitor safely and effectively.

Register Now

 

Sveta Smirnova

Principal Support Escalation Specialist

Sveta joined Percona in 2015. Her main professional interests are problem-solving, working with tricky issues, bugs, finding patterns that can quickly solve typical issues and teaching others how to deal with MySQL issues, bugs and gotchas effectively. Before joining Percona, Sveta worked as Support Engineer in MySQL Bugs Analysis Support Group in MySQL AB-Sun-Oracle. She is the author of book “MySQL Troubleshooting” and JSON UDF functions for MySQL.

The post Webinar 6/27: MySQL Troubleshooting Best Practices: Monitoring the Production Database Without Killing Performance appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
25
2018
--

Webinar Tues 6/26: MariaDB Server 10.3

MariaDB 10.3 Webinar

MariaDB 10.3 WebinarPlease join Percona’s Chief Evangelist, Colin Charles on Tuesday, June 26th, 2018, as he presents MariaDB Server 10.3 at 7:00 AM PDT (UTC-7) / 10:00 AM EDT (UTC-4).

 

MariaDB Server 10.3 is out. It has some interesting features around system versioned tables, Oracle compatibility, column compression, an integrated SPIDER engine, as well as MyRocks. Learn about what’s new, how you can use it, and how it is different from MySQL.

Register Now

Colin Charles

Chief Evangelist

Colin Charles is the Chief Evangelist at Percona. He was previously on the founding team of MariaDB Server in 2009, and had worked at MySQL since 2005, and been a MySQL user since 2000. Before joining MySQL, he worked actively on the Fedora and OpenOffice.org projects. He’s well known within open source communities in APAC, and has spoken at many conferences. Experienced technologist, well known in the open source world for work that spans nearly two decades within the community. Pays attention to emerging technologies from an integration standpoint. Prolific speaker at many industry-wide conferences delivering talks and tutorials with ease. Interests: application development, systems administration, database development, migration, Web-based technologies. Considered expert in Linux and Mac OS X usage/administration/roll-out’s. Specialties: MariaDB, MySQL, Linux, Open Source, Community, speaking & writing to technical audiences as well as business stakeholders.

The post Webinar Tues 6/26: MariaDB Server 10.3 appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
22
2018
--

This Week in Data with Colin Charles 43: Polyglots, Security and DataOps.Barcelona

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

This is a short working week for me due to a family emergency. It caused me to skip speaking at DataOps.Barcelona and miss hanging out with the awesome of speakers and attendees. This is the first time I’ve missed a scheduled talk, and I received many messages about my absence. I am sure we will all meet again soon.

One of the talks I was planning to give at DataOps.Barcelona will be available as a Percona webinar next week: Securing Your Database Servers from External Attacks on Thursday, June 28, 2018, at 7:00 AM PDT (UTC-7) / 10:00 AM EDT (UTC-4). I am also giving a MariaDB 10.3 overview on Tuesday, June 26, 2018, at 7:00 AM PDT (UTC-7) / 10:00 AM EDT (UTC-4). I will “virtually” see you there.

If you haven’t already read Werner Vogel’s post A one size fits all database doesn’t fit anyone, I highly recommend it. It is true there is no “one size fits all” solution when it comes to databases. This is why Percona has made “the polyglot world” a theme. It’s why Amazon offers different database flavors: relational (Aurora for MySQL/PostgreSQL, RDS for MySQL/PostgreSQL/MariaDB Server), key-value (DynamoDB), document (DynamoDB), graph (Neptune), in-memory (ElastiCache for Redis & Memcached), search (Elasticsearch service). The article has a plethora of use cases, from AirBnB using Aurora, to Snapchat Stories and Tinder using DynamoDB, to Thomson Reuters using Neptune, down to McDonald’s using ElastiCache and Expedia using Elasticsearch. This kind of detail, and customer use case, is great.

There are plenty more stories and anecdotes in the post, and it validates why Percona is focused not just on MySQL, but also MariaDB, MongoDB, PostgreSQL and polyglot solutions. From a MySQL lens, it’s also worth noting that not one storage engine fits every use case. Facebook famously migrated a lot of their workload from InnoDB to MyRocks, and it is exciting to see Mark Callaghan stating that there are already three big workloads on MyRocks in production, with another two coming soon.

Releases

  • MariaDB 10.1.34 – including fixes for InnoDB defragmentation and full text search (MDEV-15824). This was from the WebScaleSQL tree, ported by KakaoTalk to MariaDB Server.
  • Percona XtraDB Cluster 5.6.40-26.25 – now with Percona Server for MySQL 5.6.40, including a new variable to configure rolling schema upgrade (RSU) wait for active commit connection timeouts.
  • Are you using the MariaDB Connector/C, Connector/J or Connector/ODBC? A slew of updates abound.

Link List

Industry Updates

Upcoming appearances

  • OSCON – Portland, Oregon, USA – July 16-19 2018

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

The post This Week in Data with Colin Charles 43: Polyglots, Security and DataOps.Barcelona appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
20
2018
--

Is Serverless Just a New Word for Cloud Based?

serverless architecture

serverless architectureServerless is a new buzzword in the database industry. Even though it gets tossed around often, there is some confusion about what it really means and how it really works. Serverless architectures rely on third-party Backend as a Service (BaaS) services. They can also include custom code that is run in managed, ephemeral containers on a Functions as a Service (FaaS) platform. In comparison to traditional Platform as a Service (PaaS) server architecture, where you pay a predetermined sum for your instances, serverless applications benefit from reduced costs of operations and lower complexity. They are also considered to be more agile, allowing for reduced engineering efforts.

In reality, there are still servers in a serverless architecture: they are just being used, managed, and maintained outside of the application. But isn’t that a lot like what cloud providers, such as Amazon RDS, Google Cloud, and Microsoft Azure, are already offering? Well, yes, but with several caveats.

When you use any of the aforementioned platforms, you still need to provision the types of instances that you plan to use and define how those platforms will act. For example, will it run MySQL, MongoDB, PostgreSQL, or some other tool? With serverless, these decisions are no longer needed. Instead, you simply consume resources from a shared resource pool, using whatever application suits your needs at that time. In addition, in a serverless world, you are only charged for the time that you use the server instead of being charged whether you use it a lot or a little (or not at all).

Remember When You Joined That Gym?

How many of us have purchased a gym membership at some point in our life? Oftentimes, you walk in with the best of intentions and happily enroll in a monthly plan. “For only $29.95 per month, you can use all of the resources of the gym as much as you want.” But, many of us have purchased such a membership and found that our visits to the gym dwindle over time, leaving us paying the same monthly fee for less usage.

Traditional Database as a Service (DBaaS) offerings are similar to your gym membership: you sign up, select your service options, and start using them right away. There are certainly cases of companies using those services consistently, just like there are gym members who show up faithfully month after month. But there are also companies who spin up database instances for a specific purpose, use the database instance for some amount of time, and then slowly find that they are accessing that instance less and less. However, the fees for the instance, much like the fees for your gym membership, keep getting charged.

What if we had a “pay as you go” gym plan? Well, some of those certainly exist. Serverless architecture is somewhat like this plan: you only pay for the resources when you use them, and you only pay for your specific usage. This would be like charging $5 for access to the weight room and $3 for access to the swimming pool, each time you use one or the other. The one big difference with serverless architecture for databases is that you still need to have your data stored somewhere in the environment and made available to you as needed. This would be like renting a gym locker to store your workout gear so that didn’t have to bring it back and forth each time you visited.

Obviously, you will pay for that storage, whether it is your data or your workout gear, but the storage fees are going to be less than your standard membership. The big advantage is that you have what you need when you need it, and you can access the necessary resources to use whatever you are storing.

With a serverless architecture, you store your data securely on low cost storage devices and access as needed. The resources required to process that data are available on an on demand basis. So, your charges are likely to be lower since you are paying a low fee for data storage and a usage fee on resources. This can work great for companies that do not need 24x7x365 access to their data since they are only paying for the services when they are using them. It’s also ideal for developers, who may find that they spend far more time working on their application code than testing it against the database. Instead of paying for the database resources while the data is just sitting there doing nothing, you now pay to store the data and incur the database associated fees at use time.

Benefits and Risks of Going Serverless

One of the biggest possible benefits of going with a serverless architecture is that you save money and hassle. Money can be saved since you only pay for the resources when you use them. Hassle is reduced since you don’t need to worry about the hardware on which your application runs. These can be big wins for a company, but you need to be aware of some pitfalls.

First, serverless can save you money, but there is no guarantee that it will save you money.

Consider 2 different people who have the exact same cell phone – maybe it’s your dad and your teenage daughter. These 2 users probably have very different patterns of usage: your dad uses the phone sporadically (if at all!) and your teenage daughter seems to have her phone physically attached to her. These 2 people would benefit from different service plans with their provider. For your dad, a basic plan that allows some usage (similar to the base cost of storage in our serverless database) with charges for usage above that cap would probably suffice. However, such a plan for your teenage daughter would probably spiral out of control and incur very high usage fees. For her, an unlimited plan makes sense. What is a great fit for one user is a poor fit for another, and the same is true when comparing serverless and DBaaS options.

The good news is that serverless architectures and DBaaS options, like Amazon RDS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud, reduce a lot of the hassle of owning and managing servers. You no longer need to be concerned about Mean Time Between Failures, power and cooling issues, or many of the other headaches that come with maintaining your hardware. However, this can also have a negative consequence.

The challenge of enforced updates

About the only thing that is consistent about software in today’s world is that it is constantly changing. New versions are released with new features that may or may not be important to you. When a serverless provider decides to implement a new version or patch of their backend, there may be some downstream issues for you to manage. It is always important to test any new updates, but now some of the decisions about how and when to upgrade may be out of your control. Proper notification from the provider gives you a window of time for testing, but they are probably going to flip the switch regardless of whether or not you have completed all of your test cycles. This is true of both serverless and DBaaS options.

A risk of vendor lock-in

A common mantra in the software world is that we want to avoid vendor lock-in. Of course, from the provider’s side, they want to avoid customer churn, so we often find ourselves on opposite sides of the same issue. Moving to a new platform or provider becomes more complex as you cede more aspects of server management to the host. This means that serverless can cause deep lock-in since your application is designed to work with the environment as your provider has configured it. If you choose to move to a different provider, you need to extract your application and your data from the current provider and probably need to rework it to fit the requirements of the new provider.

The challenge of client-side optimization

Another consideration is that optimizations of server-side configurations must necessarily be more generic compared to those you might make to self-hosted servers. Optimization can no longer be done at the server level for your specific application and use; instead, you now rely on a smarter client to perform your necessary optimizations. This requires a skill set that may not exist with some developers: the ability to tune applications client-side.

Conclusion

Serverless is not going away. In fact, it is likely to grow as people come to a better understanding and comfort level with it. You need to be able to make an informed decision regarding whether serverless is right for you. Careful consideration of the pros and cons is imperative for making a solid determination. Understanding your usage patterns, user expectations, development capabilities, and a lot more will help to guide that decision.

In a future post, I’ll review the architectural differences between on-premises, PaaS, DBaaS and serverless database environments.

 

The post Is Serverless Just a New Word for Cloud Based? appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

Jun
01
2018
--

This Week in Data with Colin Charles 40: a Peak at Blockchain, Lots of MariaDB News, then Back on the Road

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

Shortly after the last dispatch, I jetted off for a spot of vacation (which really meant I was checking out the hype behind Blockchain with a database developer lens at the Blockchain Week NYC), and then some customer visits in Seoul, which explains the short hiatus. Here’s to making this more regular as the summer approaches.

I am about to embark on a fairly long trip, covering a few upcoming appearances: Lisbon for the Percona Engineering meeting, SouthEastLinuxFest in Charlotte, the Open Source Data Centre Conference in Berlin and then the DataOps Barcelona event. I have some discount codes: 50% discount for OSDC with the code OSDC_FOR_FRIENDS, and 50% discount for DataOps Barcelona with the code dataopsbcn50. Expect this column to reflect my travels over the next few weeks.

There has been a lot of news on the MariaDB front: MariaDB 10.3.7 went stable/GA! You might have noticed more fanfare around the release name MariaDB TX 3.0, but the reality is you can still get this download from your usual MariaDB Foundation site. It is worth noting that the MariaDB Foundation 2017 financials have also been released. Some may have noticed a couple months back there was a press release titled Report “State of the Open-Source DBMS Market, 2018” by Gartner Includes Pricing Comparison With MariaDB. This led to a Gartner report on the State of the Open-Source DBMS Market, 2018; although the report has since been pulled. Hopefully we see it surface again.

In the meantime, please do try out MariaDB 10.3.7 and it would be great to hear feedback. I also have an upcoming Percona webinar on MariaDB Server 10.3 on June 26 2018 — when the sign up link appears, I will be sure to include it here.

Well written, and something worth discussing: Should Red Hat Buy or Build a Database?. The Twitter discussion is also worth looking at.

Releases

Link List

Upcoming appearances

Feedback

I look forward to receiving feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

The post This Week in Data with Colin Charles 40: a Peak at Blockchain, Lots of MariaDB News, then Back on the Road appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

May
24
2018
--

Using dbdeployer to manage MySQL, Percona Server and MariaDB sandboxes

dbdeployer by Giuseppe Maxia

Some years ago, Peter Z wrote a blogpost about using MySQL Sandbox to deploy multiple server versions. Last February, Giuseppe  introduced us to its successor: dbdeployer. In this blogpost we will demonstrate how to use it. There is a lot of information in Giuseppe’s post, so head there if you want a deeper dive.

First step is to install it, which is really easy to do now since it’s developed in Go, and standalone executables are provided. You can get the latest version here.

shell> wget https://github.com/datacharmer/dbdeployer/releases/download/1.5.0/dbdeployer-1.5.0.linux.tar.gz
shell> tar xzf dbdeployer-1.5.0.linux.tar.gz
shell> mv dbdeployer-1.5.0.linux ~/bin/dbdeployer

If you have your ~/bin/ directory in the path, you should now be able to run dbdeployer commands.

dbdeployer by Giuseppe Maxia

Let’s start with deploying a latest version vanilla MySQL sandbox.

In the Support Team, we extensively use MySQL Sandbox (the predecessor to dbdeployer) to easily run different flavours and versions of MySQL so that we can test with the same versions our customers present us with. We store MySQL binaries in /opt/, so we can all share them and avoid wasting disk space on duplicated binaries.

The first step to using dbdeployer is getting the binary we want to run, and then unpacking it into the binaries directory.

shell> wget https://dev.mysql.com/get/Downloads/MySQL-8.0/mysql-8.0.11-linux-glibc2.12-x86_64.tar.gz
shell> dbdeployer --sandbox-binary=/opt/mysql/ unpack mysql-8.0.11-linux-glibc2.12-x86_64.tar.gz

This command will extract and move the files to the appropriate directory, which in this case is under /opt/mysql/ as overridden with the --sandbox-binary argument, so we can use them with the deploy command.

Standalone

To create a new standalone MySQL sandbox with the newly extracted binary, we can use the following command.

shell> dbdeployer --sandbox-binary=/opt/mysql/ deploy single 8.0.11
Creating directory /home/vagrant/sandboxes
Database installed in $HOME/sandboxes/msb_8_0_11
run 'dbdeployer usage single' for basic instructions'
.. sandbox server started

You can read the dbdeployer usage output to have even more information on how the tool works. Next, let’s connect to it.

shell> cd sandboxes/msb_8_0_11/
shell> ./use
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or g.
Your MySQL connection id is 9
Server version: 8.0.11 MySQL Community Server - GPL
Copyright (c) 2000, 2018, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
owners.
Type 'help;' or 'h' for help. Type 'c' to clear the current input statement.
mysql [localhost] {msandbox} ((none)) > select @@version, @@port;
+-----------+--------+
| @@version | @@port |
+-----------+--------+
| 8.0.11    | 8011 |
+-----------+--------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

And that was it! When creating the new instance, dbdeployer will try to use the same port as the version numbers concatenated. If that port is in use, it will try another one, or we can manually override it with the --port argument.

Replication

We can also easily setup a replication environment with just one command.

shell> dbdeployer --sandbox-binary=/opt/mariadb/ deploy replication 10.2.15
Installing and starting master
. sandbox server started
Installing and starting slave1
. sandbox server started
Installing and starting slave2
. sandbox server started
$HOME/sandboxes/rsandbox_10_2_15/initialize_slaves
initializing slave 1
initializing slave 2
Replication directory installed in $HOME/sandboxes/rsandbox_10_2_15
run 'dbdeployer usage multiple' for basic instructions'

Again, you should run the recommended command to get more insight into what can be done. We can use the ./m script to connect to the master, and ./s1 to connect to the first slave. The ./use_all* scripts can come in handy to run commands in many servers at a time.

Multiple sandboxes

Finally, we will see how to create multiple sandboxes with the same version at the same time.

shell> dbdeployer --sandbox-binary=/opt/percona_server/ deploy multiple 5.7.21
Installing and starting node 1
. sandbox server started
Installing and starting node 2
. sandbox server started
Installing and starting node 3
. sandbox server started
multiple directory installed in $HOME/sandboxes/multi_msb_5_7_21
run 'dbdeployer usage multiple' for basic instructions'

This could be useful for setting up environments that are not already covered by the tool, like Galera clusters or semi-sync replication. With this approach, we will at least have a base to start from, and then can use our own custom scripts. dbdeployer now has templates, which would allow extending functionality to support this, if needed. I have not yet tried to do so, but sounds like an interesting project for the future! Let me know if you would be interested in reading more about it.

The post Using dbdeployer to manage MySQL, Percona Server and MariaDB sandboxes appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

May
22
2018
--

Percona Toolkit 3.0.10 Is Now Available

percona toolkit

percona toolkitPercona announces the release of Percona Toolkit 3.0.10 on May 22, 2018.

Percona Toolkit is a collection of advanced open source command-line tools, developed and used by the Percona technical staff, that are engineered to perform a variety of MySQL®, MongoDB® and system tasks that are too difficult or complex to perform manually. With over 1,000,000 downloads, Percona Toolkit supports Percona Server for MySQL, MySQL®, MariaDB®, Percona Server for MongoDB and MongoDB.

Percona Toolkit, like all Percona software, is free and open source. You can download packages from the website or install from official repositories.

This release includes the following changes:

New Features:

  • PT-131: pt-table-checksum disables the QRT plugin
    The Query Response Time Plugin provides a tool for analyzing information by counting and displaying the number of queries according to the length of time they took to execute. This feature enables a new flag

    --disable-qrt-plugin

      that leverages Percona Server for MySQL’s new ability to disable QRT plugin at the session level. The advantage to enabling this Toolkit feature is that the QRT metrics are not impacted by the work that pt-table-checksum performs. This means that QRT metrics report only the work your Application is generating on MySQL, and not clouded by the activities of pt-table-checksum.

  • PT-118: pt-table-checksum reports the number of rows of difference between master and slave
    We’re adding support for pt-table-checksum to identify the number of row differences between master and slave. Previously you were able to see only the count of chunks that differed between hosts. This is helpful for situations where you believe you can tolerate some measure of row count drift between hosts, but want to be precise in understanding what that row count difference actually is.

Improvements

  • PT-1546: Improved support for MySQL 8 roles
  • PT-1543: The encrypted table status query causes high load over multiple minutes
    Users reported that listing encrypted table status can be very slow.  We’ve enabled this functionality via --list-encrypted-tables and set it to default of disabled.
  • PT-1536: Added info about encrypted tablespaces in pt-mysql-summary
    We’ve improved pt-mysql-summary to now include information about encrypted tablespaces.  This information is available by using

    --list-encrypted-tables

     .

Bug Fixes:

  • PT-1556pt-table-checksum 3.0.9 does not change binlog_format to statement any more.

pt-show-grants has several known issues when working with MySQL 8 and roles, which Percona aims to address in subsequent Percona Toolkit releases: PT-1560PT-1559, and PT-1558

Help us improve our software quality by reporting any bugs you encounter using our bug tracking system.

The post Percona Toolkit 3.0.10 Is Now Available appeared first on Percona Database Performance Blog.

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