Jun
27
2018
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Intermix.io looks to help data engineers find their worst bottlenecks

For any company built on top of machine learning operations, the more data it has, the better it is off — as long as it can keep it all under control. But as more and more information pours in from disparate sources, gets logged in obscure databases and is generally hard (or slow) to query, the process of getting that all into one neat place where a data scientist can actually start running the statistics is quickly running into one of machine learning’s biggest bottlenecks.

That’s a problem Intermix.io and its founders, Paul Lappas and Lars Kamp, hope to solve. Engineers get a granular look at all of the different nuances behind what’s happening with some specific function, from the query all the way through all of the paths it’s taking to get to its end result. The end product is one that helps data engineers monitor the flow of information going through their systems, regardless of the source, to isolate bottlenecks early and see where processes are breaking down. The company also said it has raised seed funding from Uncork Capital, S28 Capital, PAUA Ventures along with Bastian Lehman, CEO of Postmates and Hasso Plattner, founder of SAP.

“Companies realize being data driven is a key to success,” Kamp said. “The cloud makes it cheap and easy to store your data forever, machine learning libraries are making things easy to digest. But a company that wants to be data driven wants to hire a data scientist. This is the wrong first hire. To do that they need access to all the relevant data, and have it be complete and clean. That falls to data engineers who need to build data assembly lines where they are creating meaningful types to get data usable to the data scientist. That’s who we serve.”

Intermix.io works in a couple of ways: First, it tags all of that data, giving the service a meta-layer of understanding what does what, and where it goes; second, it taps every input in order to gather metrics on performance and help identify those potential bottlenecks; and lastly, it’s able to track that performance all the way from the query to the thing that ends up on a dashboard somewhere. The idea here is that if, say, some server is about to run out of space somewhere or is showing some performance degradation, that’s going to start showing up in the performance of the actual operations pretty quickly — and needs to be addressed.

All of this is an efficiency play that might not seem to make sense at a smaller scale. The waterfall of new devices that come online every day, as well as more and more ways of understanding how people use tools online, even the smallest companies can quickly start building massive data sets. And if that company’s business depends on some machine learning happening in the background, that means it’s dependent on all that training and tracking happening as quickly and smoothly as possible, with any hiccups leading to real-term repercussions for its own business.

Intermix.io isn’t the first company to try to create some application performance management software. There are others like Data Dog and New Relic, though Lappas says that the primary competition from them comes in the form of traditional APM software with some additional scripts tacked on. However, data flows are a different layer altogether, which means they require a more unique and custom approach to addressing that problem.

Nov
07
2016
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New Relic extends monitoring to containers and micro service environments

New Relic Dashboard Monitoring used to be a relatively simple matter. Most companies had a fixed number of applications to monitor. These were usually delivered on the web and lived for a number of years on a fairly fixed number of servers.
Today’s environment is far more varied and complex, and New Relic made a series of announcements today designed to help customers deal with new ways of delivering… Read More

Jul
15
2016
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Sales startup Immediately will shut down as team members join New Relic

immediately Immediately, a startup that built mobile sales tools, will be shutting down at the end of the month, while part of the team will move on to cloud-monitoring company New Relic. According to the official announcement, both the Immediately app (which offers a number of features, including phone logging and detecting when emails are opened) and the company’s Gong app (a “pocket… Read More

Nov
12
2015
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New Relic Now Lets Developers Dive Deeper Into Their Analytics

new_relic_disrupt_afterparty New Relic is launching a new analytics component for its application and server monitoring suite today that allows developers to drill even deeper into the data their code (and users) generate. The New Relic Software Analytics Cloud is now available to all paying New Relic customers. New Relic’s VP of product management Patrick Lightbody told me the team realized that basic monitoring… Read More

Nov
05
2015
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New Relic Acquires Cloud Infrastructure Monitoring Service Opsmatic

blog-nr The application monitoring service New Relic today announced better-than-expected quarterly earnings, but in addition, it also today disclosed that it has acquired the cloud infrastructure monitoring company Opsmatic.
New Relic mostly focuses on giving insight into how well their applications are performing on their servers. Opsmatic takes a similar approach, but its focus is more on the… Read More

Oct
08
2014
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New Relic Buys Dashboard Tool Ducksboard As It Continues Expansion Into Analytics

Two business people (just see their hands) workign on charts and graphs on paper and a tablet. When you think of New Relic, you might think of traditional server-side application performance monitoring, and of course New Relic does that and other monitoring tasks, but increasingly it’s moving into analytics and today at its FutureStack user conference, the company announced it has bought cloud dashboard-building tool Ducksboard as it continues to broaden its analytics… Read More

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