Feb
23
2018
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This Week in Data with Colin Charles 29: Percona Live Full Schedule, MariaDB Events, and a Matter of Compatibility

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

I think the biggest news from Percona-land is that besides the tutorial grid, the schedule for day 1 and day 2 are live! Also notice the many “sub-themes”: a 101 track, using MySQL, MongoDB, cloud, MySQL database software, PostgreSQL, containers & automation, monitoring & ops, and misc. database stuff. Learn from 107 different experts (this number is likely to increase). So register now.

This coming week, Peter Zaitsev, Tom Basil, and I will be in New York. Some of us will be at the MariaDB 2018 Developers Unconference, and all of us will be attending M|18. We have a schedule for the Developers Unconference, and I hope you find time on Sunday to join us as I present MySQL features missing in MariaDB  between 12:15-13:00. Being an unconference, it shouldn’t just be a presentation, but also active discussion. I recall during the FOSDEM MySQL DevRoom, MariaDB Foundation developer Vicentiu Ciorbaru assigned to himself support for the super readonly feature (see tweet).

If you have thoughts of what you like in MySQL but are missing from MariaDB Server, please don’t hesitate to tweet at me @bytebot, or even drop me an email: colin.charles@percona.com. I will happily change and add to the slides until Sunday morning, Eastern Standard Time.

Why is this important? Quite simply, take a look at Todd Farmer’s blog post: Bitten by MariaDB 10.2 Incompatible Change. Here’s Cloudera Manager failing, on specific minor versions of software since the behavior changed (so this particular issue occurs in 10.2.8+ but not before!). I’d definitely spend some time reading the comments as well as the associated Jira. Maybe with 10.3/10.4, it’s time to stop calling it a “drop-in replacement” (an initial goal when I worked on MariaDB Server), and just call it something else. Maybe something for the new Chief Marketing Officer to think about?

Releases

Link List

Upcoming appearances

  • SCALE16x – Pasadena, California, USA – March 8-11 2018
  • FOSSASIA 2018 – Singapore – March 22-25 2018

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

Feb
16
2018
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This Week in Data with Colin Charles 28: Percona Live, MongoDB Transactions and Spectre/Meltdown Rumble On

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

In case you missed last week’s column, don’t forget to read the fairly lengthy FOSDEM MySQL & Friends DevRoom summary.

From a Percona Live Santa Clara 2018 standpoint, beyond the tutorials getting picked and scheduled, the talks have also been picked and scheduled (so you were very likely getting acceptance emails from the Hubb.me system by Tuesday). The rejections have not gone out yet but will follow soon. I expect the schedule to go live either today (end of week) or early next week. Cheapest tickets end March 4, so don’t wait to register!

Amazon Relational Database Service has had a lot of improvements in 2017, and the excellent summary from Jeff Barr is worth a read: Amazon Relational Database Service – Looking Back at 2017. Plenty of improvements for the MySQL, MariaDB Server, PostgreSQL and Aurora worlds.

Spectre/Meltdown and its impact are still being discovered. You need to read Brendan Gregg’s amazing post: KPTI/KAISER Meltdown Initial Performance Regressions. And if you visit Percona Live, you’ll see an amazing keynote from him too! Are you still using MyISAM? MyISAM and KPTI – Performance Implications From The Meltdown Fix suggests switching to Aria or InnoDB.

Probably the biggest news this week though? Transactions are coming to MongoDB 4.0. From the site, “MongoDB 4.0 will add support for multi-document transactions, making it the only database to combine the speed, flexibility, and power of the document model with ACID guarantees. Through snapshot isolation, transactions will provide a globally consistent view of data, and enforce all-or-nothing execution to maintain data integrity.”. You want to read the blog post, MongoDB Drops ACID (the title works if you’re an English native speaker, but maybe not quite if you aren’t). The summary diagram was a highlight for me because you can see the building blocks, plus future plans for MongoDB 4.2.

Releases

Link List

Upcoming appearances

  • SCALE16x – Pasadena, California, USA – March 8-11 2018
  • FOSSASIA 2018 – Singapore – March 22-25 2018

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

Feb
12
2018
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Does Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) Support External Monitoring Services? Yes It Does!

External Monitoring Services

Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) is a free and open-source platform for managing and monitoring MySQL and MongoDB performance. You can run PMM in your own environment for maximum security and reliability. It provides thorough time-based analysis for MySQL and MongoDB servers to ensure that your data works as efficiently as possible.

Starting with version 1.4.0 and improved in 1.7.0, PMM supports external monitoring services. This means you can plug in Prometheus exporters for technologies not directly provided by Percona. For example, you can start monitoring the metrics of your PostgreSQL database host, Memcached or Redis.

Exporters Overview

Applications store their metrics in arbitrary formats, and Prometheus exporters collect them and produce (or export to) a consistent format of key-value pairs. The keys refer to metric types and values are numbers in the float 64 format. Due to the diversity of formats that applications may use, you should program a specific exporter for each format. However, if you decide to make the metrics of your application available via PMM you may consider using one of existing Prometheus exporters.

Currently, PMM offers exporters for MySQL (mysqld_exporter) and MongoDB (mongodb_exporter) database management systems. Built-in exporters also exist for Percona XtraDBCluster, MariaDB, RDS and Aurora via mysqld_exporter and for ProxySQL (via proxysql_exporter). These exporters are made available as monitoring services that you can add or remove as necessary. In addition, PMM includes the node_exporter to capture the host level Linux metrics such as CPU, Load, and disk resources.

Using Exporters

On the computer where the PMM client is installed and connected to a PMM server, make use of the pmm-admin utility to add any built-in monitoring service directly. There is no extra effort in this case: the added monitoring service will run its exporter and all required configuration updates are made automatically to make the metrics available in the web interface for further analysis in Query analytics and Metrics monitor.

In case of external monitoring services, you need to locate, download, set up and run the specific Prometheus exporter to collect metrics. When it is ready, you can add it as a monitoring service:

pmm-admin add external:service job_name [instance] --service-port=PORT_NUMBER

This command adds an external monitoring service bound to the Prometheus job that you specify as the job_name parameter. You should also provide the port associated with this Prometheus job as the value of the service-port parameter. The instance parameter is optional. By default, it is assigned the name of the host where you run pmm-admin.

Example 1: Adding a PostgreSQL Monitoring Service

In order to add an external monitoring service for a PostgreSQL database server, make sure to install and configure your PostgreSQL server. Then, select a PostgreSQL Prometheus exporter from the list available from the  Prometheus site, such as PostgreSQL metric exporter for Prometheus. Refer to the documentation for this exporter for details about how to install and set it up.

As soon as your Prometheus exporter can collect metrics from your PostgreSQL database server,  you are ready to add this exporter as a monitoring service. Make sure that you have access to a configured PMM server and your PMM client has been set up to use it. Use the pmm-admin utility, which is part of PMM client, to add the PostgreSQL monitoring service. Assuming postgresql is the name of this monitoring service, your command should look like this:

pmm-admin add external:service --service-port=PORT_NUMBER postgresql

It is time now to display the metrics on the PMM Server. Open Metrics Monitor and check the Advanced Data Exploration dashboard. This can dashboard visualize a lot of metrics including those exposed by external monitoring services. In the Host field select your host. Use the Metric field to select a metric.

External Monitoring Services
Viewing a metric exposed by a PostgreSQL exporter.

Setting up an external monitoring service requires extra work compared to adding built-in monitoring services. However, by using external monitoring services you can considerably extend the capabilities of your PMM installation.

Note that running the pmm-admin list command lists the added external monitoring services. They also appear in the JSON output, too. To remove an external service use the remove (or its short form rm) command:

pmm-admin rm external:service --service-port=PORT_NUMBER NAME_OF_EXTERNAL_MONITORING_SERVICE

$ sudo pmm-admin list
pmm-admin 1.7.0
PMM Server      | 192.0.2.2 (password-protected)
Client Name     | postgres01
Client Address  | 192.0.2.3
Service Manager | unix-systemv
Job name    Scrape interval  Scrape timeout  Metrics path  Scheme  Target         Labels                   Health
postgresql  1s               1s              /metrics      http    192.0.2.3:9187 instance="postgres01"      UP

Example 2: Adding a Redis Monitoring Service

To start with, you must install a Prometheus exporter for Redis (this exporter is listed on the Prometheus Exporters and Integrations page) on the machine where your PMM client runs. The following command adds this exporter as an external monitoring service (run it as a superuser or use sudo). This time the command has an extra parameter:

$ sudo pmm-admin add external:service redis --service-port 9121 redis01
External service added.

Notice that we use Redis Server as the last parameter passed to pmm-admin add external:service command. The last positional parameter is a label that you assign to this particular instance.

pmm-admin add external:service --service-port=PORT_NUMBER NAME_OF_EXTERNAL_MONITORING_SERVICE [INSTANCE_LABEL]

You may choose any name for this purpose. Make sure to use quotes if you decide to use a label made of two or more words.

$ sudo pmm-admin list
pmm-admin 1.7.0
PMM Server | 127.0.0.1
Client Name | percona
Client Address | 172.17.0.1
Service Manager | linux-systemd
No services under monitoring.
Job name Scrape interval Scrape timeout Metrics path Scheme Target          Labels                  Health
redis    1m0s            10s            /metrics     http   172.17.0.1:9121 instance="redis01"      UP

To view Redis related metrics you need to open the Advanced Data Exploration dashboard on your PMM Server. The redis01 label automatically appears in the Host field in the Advanced Data Exploration dashboard. In the Host field, select the redis01 option and choose a metric to view from the Metric field, such as redis_exporter_scrapes_total.

Other Ways to Add External Services

The pmm-admin add external:service command is the recommended way to add an external monitoring service. There exist other, more specific, methods. The pmm-admin add external:metrics adds external Prometheus exporters job to metrics monitoring.

Feb
09
2018
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Collect PostgreSQL Metrics with Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM)

Collecting PostgreSQL Information using Percona Monitoring and Management

In this article, we’ll describe how to collect PostgreSQL metrics with Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM).

We designed Percona Monitoring and Management (PMM) to be the best tool for MySQL and MongoDB performance investigation. At the same time, it’s built on mature opensource components: Prometheus’ time series database and Grafana. Starting from PMM 1.4.0. it’s possible to add monitoring for any service supported by Prometheus.

Demo

# install docker and docker-compose.
git clone https://github.com/ihanick/pmm-postgresql-demo.git
cd pmm-postgresql-demo
docker-compose build
docker-compose up

At this point, we are running exporter, PostgreSQL and the PMM server, but pmm-client on the PostgreSQL server isn’t configured.

docker-compose exec pg sh /root/initpmm.sh

Now we configured pmm client and added external exporter.

Let’s assume that you have executed commands above on the localhost. At this point we have several URLs:

We also need to create graphs for our new exporter. This could be done manually (import JSON), or you can import the existing dashboard Postgres_exporter published in the Grafana gallery by number in the catalog:

  1. Go to your PMM server web interface and press on the Grafana icon at the top left corner, then dashboards, the import.
  2. Copy and paste the dashboard ID from the Grafana site to “Grafana.com Dashboard” field, and press load.
  3. In the next dialog, choose Prometheus as a data source and continue.

PostgreSQL performance graphs can be seen at: http://localhost:8080/graph/dashboard/db/postgres_exporter?orgId=1

collect PostgreSQL metrics with Percona Monitoring and Management
PMM PostgreSQL postgres_exporter template

 

PMM-PostgreSQL Demo Under the Hood

To move this configuration to production, we need to understand how this demo works.

PMM Server

First of all, you need an existing PMM Server. You can find details on new server configuration at Deploying Percona Monitoring and Management.

In my demo I’m starting PMM without volumes, and all metrics dropped after using the docker-compose down command. Also, there is no need to use port 8080 for PMM, set it up with SSL support and password in production.

PostgreSQL Setup

I’m modifying the latest default PostgreSQL image to:

Of course, you can use a dedicated PostgreSQL server instead of one running inside a docker-compose sandbox. The only requirement is that the PMM server should be able to connect to this server.

User creation and permissions:

CREATE DATABASE postgres_exporter;
CREATE USER postgres_exporter PASSWORD 'password';
ALTER USER postgres_exporter SET SEARCH_PATH TO postgres_exporter,pg_catalog;
-- If deploying as non-superuser (for example in AWS RDS)
-- GRANT postgres_exporter TO :MASTER_USER;
CREATE SCHEMA postgres_exporter AUTHORIZATION postgres_exporter;
CREATE VIEW postgres_exporter.pg_stat_activity
AS
  SELECT * from pg_catalog.pg_stat_activity;
GRANT SELECT ON postgres_exporter.pg_stat_activity TO postgres_exporter;
CREATE VIEW postgres_exporter.pg_stat_replication AS
  SELECT * from pg_catalog.pg_stat_replication;
GRANT SELECT ON postgres_exporter.pg_stat_replication TO postgres_exporter;

To simplify setup, you can use a superuser account and access pg_catalog directly. To improve security, allow this user to connect only from exporter host.

PMM Client Setup on PostgreSQL Host

You can obtain database-only statistics with just the external exporter, and you can use any host with pmm-client installed. Fortunately, you can also export Linux metrics from the database host.

After installing the pmm-client package, you still need to configure the system. We should point it to the PMM server and register the external exporter (and optionally add the linux:metrics exporter).

#!/bin/sh
pmm-admin config --client-name pg1 --server pmm-server
pmm-admin add external:metrics postgresql pgexporter:9187
# optional
pmm-admin add linux:metrics
# other postgresql instances
pmm-admin add external:instances postgresql 172.18.0.3:9187

It’s important to keep the external exporter job name as “postgresql”, since all existing templates check it. There is a bit of inconsistency here: the first postgresql server is added as external:metrics, but all further servers should be added as external:instances.

The reason is the first command creates the Prometheus job and first instance, and further servers can be added without job creation.

PMM 1.7.0 external:service

Starting from PMM 1.7.0 the setup simplified if exporter located on the same host as pmm-client:

pmm-admin config --client-name pg1 --server pmm-server
pmm-admin add external:service --service-port=9187 postgresql

pmm-admin add external:metrics or pmm-admin add external:instances are not required if you are running exporter on the same host as pmm-client.

Exporter Setup

Exporter is a simple HTTP/HTTPS server returning one page. The format is:

curl -si http://172.17.0.4:9187/metrics|grep pg_static
# HELP pg_static Version string as reported by postgres
# TYPE pg_static untyped
pg_static{short_version="10.1.0",version="PostgreSQL 10.1 on x86_64-pc-linux-gnu, compiled by gcc (Debian 6.3.0-18) 6.3.0 20170516, 64-bit"} 1

As you can see, it’s a self-describing set of counters and string values. The Prometheus time series database built-in to PMM connects to the web server and stores the results on disk. There are multiple exporters available for PostgreSQL. postgres_exporter is listed as a third-party on the official Prometheus website.

You can compile exporter by yourself, or run it inside docker container. This and many other exporters are written in Go and compiled as a static binary so that you can copy the executable from the host with same CPU architecture. For production setups, you probably will run exporter from a database host directly and start the service with systemd.

In order to check network configuration issues, login to pmm-server and use the curl command from above. Do not forget to replace 172.17.0.4:9187 with the appropriate host:port (use the same IP address or DNS name as the pmm-admin add command).

You configure postgres_exporter with a single environment variable:

DATA_SOURCE_NAME=postgresql://postgres_exporter:password@pg:5432/postgres_exporter?sslmode=disable

Make sure that you provide the correct credentials, including the database name.

Run external exporter directly on database server

In order to simplify production setup, you can run exporter directly from the same server as you are using for running PostgreSQL.
This method allows you to use pmm-admin add external:service command recently added to PMM.

# Copy exporter binary from docker container to the local directory to skip build from sources
docker cp pmmpostgres_pgexporter_1:/postgres_exporter ./
# copy exporter binary to database host, use scp instead for existing database server.
docker cp postgres_exporter pmmpostgres_pg_1:/root/
# login to database server shell
docker exec -it pmmpostgres_pg_1 bash
# start exporter
DATA_SOURCE_NAME='postgresql://postgres_exporter:password@127.0.0.1:5432/postgres_exporter?sslmode=disable' ./postgres_exporter

Grafana Setup

In the demo, I’ve used Postgres_exporter dashboard. Use the same site and look for other PostgreSQL dashboards if you need more. The exporter provides many parameters, and not all of them are visualized in this dashboard.

For huge installations, you may find that filtering servers by “instance name” is not comfortable. Write your own JSON for the dashboard, or try to use one from demo repository. It’s the same as dashboard 3742, but uses the hostname for filtering and Prometheus job name in the legends.

All entries of instance=~"$instance" get replaced with instance=~"$host:.*".

The modification allows you to switch between PostgreSQL servers with host instead of “instance”, and see CPU and disk details for the current database server instead of the previously selected host.

Notice

This blog post on how to collect PostgreSQL metrics with Percona Monitoring and Management is not an official integration of PostgreSQL and PMM. I’ve tried to describe complex external exporters setup. Instead of PostgreSQL, you can use any other services and exporters with a similar setup, or even create your own exporter and instrument your application. It’s a great thing to see correlations between application activities and other system components like databases, web servers, etc.

Feb
02
2018
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This Week in Data with Colin Charles 26: Percona Live Schedule is Near Completion, FOSDEM Underway and a Percona Toolkit Use Case

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

Percona Live Santa Clara 2018 update: tutorials have been picked, and the schedule/press release should be announced by next week. We’ve (the committee) rated over 300+ talks, and easily 70% of the schedule should go live next week as well.

There’s a lot happening for FOSDEM this week — so expect a longer report of some sort next week.

A friend, Yanwei Zhou, DBA at Qunar in China, gave an excellent presentation in Chinese on how they use Percona Toolkit. Check it out:

Are you on Twitter? Hope you’re following the @planetmysql account.

Releases

Link List

Upcoming appearances

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

Dec
20
2017
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Percona Live 2018 Call for Papers Deadline Extended to January 12, 2018

Percona Live 2018 Call for Papers

Percona Live 2018 Call for PapersPercona is extending the Percona Live 2018 call for papers deadline to January 12, 2018!

Percona’s gift to you this holiday season is the gift of time – submit your speaking topics right up until January 12, 2018!

As the year winds up, we received many requests to extend the Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018 call for papers. Since many speakers wanted to submit during the week that they’re planning vacations (from Christmas until New Year’s Day), we realized that December 22 was too soon.

If you haven’t submitted already, please consider doing so. Speaking at Percona Live is a great way to talk about what you’re doing, build up your personal and company brands, and get collaborators to your project. If selected, all speakers receive a full complimentary conference pass.

Percona Live 2018 is the destination to share, learn and explore all pertinent topics related to open source databases. The theme for Percona Live 2018 is “Championing Open Source Databases,” with topics on MySQLMongoDB and other open source databases, including time series databases, PostgreSQL and RocksDB. Session tracks include Developers, Operations, and Business/Case Studies.

Percona Live KeynotesRemember, just like last year, we aren’t looking for just MySQL-ecosystemrelated talks (that includes MariaDB Server and Percona Server for MySQL). We are actively looking for talks around MongoDB, as well as other open source databases (so this is where you can add PostgreSQL, time series databases, graph databases, etc.). That also involves complementary technologies, such as the increasing importance of the cloud and container solutions such as Kubernetes.

Talk about your journey to open source. Describe the technical and business values of moving to or using open source databases. How did you convince your company to make the move? Was there tangible ROI? Share your case studies, best practices and technical knowledge with an engaged audience of open source peers.

We are looking for breakout sessions (25 or 50 minutes long), tutorials (3 hours or 6 hours long), and lightning talks and birds of a feather sessions. Submit as many topics as you think you can deliver well.

The conference itself features one day of tutorials and two days of talks. There will also be exciting keynote talks. Don’t forget that registration is now open, and our Super Saver tickets are the best price you can get (Super Saver tickets are on sale until January 7, 2018).

If your company is interested in sponsoring the conference, please take a look at the sponsorship prospectus.

All in, submit away and remember the Percona Live 2018 call for papers deadline is January 12, 2018. We look forward to seeing you at the conference from April 23-25 2018 in Santa Clara.

Dec
01
2017
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This Week in Data with Colin Charles 17: AWS Re:Invent, a New Book on MySQL Cluster and Another Call Out for Percona Live 2018

Colin Charles

Colin Charles Open Source Database evangelist for PerconaJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

The CFP for Percona Live Santa Clara 2018 closes December 22, 2017: please consider submitting as soon as possible. We want to make an early announcement of talks, so we’ll definitely do a first pass even before the CFP date closes. Keep in mind the expanded view of what we are after: it’s more than just MySQL and MongoDB. And don’t forget that with one day less, there will be intense competition to fit all the content in.

A new book on MySQL Cluster is out: Pro MySQL NDB Cluster by Jesper Wisborg Krogh and Mikiya Okuno. At 690 pages, it is a weighty tome, and something I fully plan on reading, considering I haven’t played with NDBCLUSTER for quite some time.

Did you know that since MySQL 5.7.17, connection control plugins are included? They help DBAs introduce an increasing delay in server response to clients after a certain number of consecutive failed connection attempts. Read more at the connection control plugins.

While there are a tonne of announcements coming out from the Amazon re:Invent 2017 event, I highly recommend also reading Some data of interest as AWS reinvent 2017 ramps up by James Governor. Telemetry data from sumologic’s 1,500 largest customers suggest that NoSQL database usage has overtaken relational database workloads! Read The State of Modern Applications in the Cloud. Page 8 tells us that MySQL is the #1 database on AWS (I don’t see MariaDB Server being mentioned which is odd; did they lump it in together?), and MySQL, Redis & MongoDB account for 40% of database adoption on AWS. In other news, Andy Jassy also mentions that less than 1.5 months after hitting 40,000 database migrations, they’ve gone past 45,000 over the Thanksgiving holiday last week. Have you started using AWS Database Migration Service?

Releases

Link List

Upcoming appearances

  • ACMUG 2017 gathering – Beijing, China, December 9-10 2017 – it was very exciting being there in 2016, I can only imagine it’s going to be bigger and better in 2017, since it is now two days long!

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

Nov
17
2017
--

This Week in Data with Colin Charles 15: Percona Live 2018 Call for Papers and Best Practices for Observability

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

So we have announced the call for presentations for Percona Live Santa Clara 2018. Please send your submissions in!

As you probably already know, we have been expanding the content to be more than just MySQL and MongoDB. It really does include more open source databases: the whole of 2016 had a “time series” theme to it, and we of course love to have more PostgreSQL content (there have been tracks dedicated to PostgreSQL for sometime now). I found this one comment interesting recently, from John Arundel, “If you’re going to learn one database really well, make it Postgres.” I have been noticing newer developers jump on the PostgreSQL bandwagon. I presume much of this blog’s readership is still MySQL centric, but it will be interesting to see where this goes.

Charity Majors recently wrote Best Practices for Observability. In addition, her book alongside Laine Campbell is now available for purchase on Kindle: Database Reliability Engineering: Designing and Operating Resilient Database Systems. Highly recommended purchase. You can also get it on O’Reilly Safari (free month with those codes for Percona Live Europe Dublin attendees).

Are you using Google Cloud Spanner? It now has multi-region support, and has an updated SLA for 99.999% uptime. That’s basically no more than 5.25 minutes of downtime per year!

Releases

  • orchestrator 3.0.3 – auto-provisioning Raft nodes, native Consul support, SQLite or MySQL backed setups, web UI improvements and more. Solid release.
  • MongoDB 3.6 – you can download this soon.
  • MariaDB 10.1.29 – important changes to Mariabackup, InnoDB/XtraDB, and some security fixes
  • Apache Kylin 2.2 – OLAP for Hadoop, originally developed at eBay, has enhanced ACL support amongst other improvements.
  • Cassandra on Azure Cosmos DB

Link List

Upcoming Appearances

  • ACMUG 2017 gathering – Beijing, China, December 9-10 2017 – it was very exciting being there in 2016, I can only imagine it’s going to be be bigger and better for 2017, since it is now two days long!

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

Nov
13
2017
--

Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018 Call for Papers Is Now Open!

Percona Live

Percona LiveAnnouncing the opening of the Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018 in Santa Clara, CA, call for papers. It will be open from now until December  22, 2017.

Our theme is “Championing Open Source Databases,” with topics of MySQL, MongoDB and other open source databases, including PostgreSQL, time series databases and RocksDB. Sessions tracks include Developers, Operations and Business/Case Studies.

We’re looking forward to your submissions! We want proposals that cover the many aspects and current trends of using open source databases, including design practices, application development, performance optimization, HA and clustering, cloud, containers and new technologies, as well as new and interesting ways to monitor and manage database environments.

Describe the technical and business values of moving to or using open source databases. How did you convince your company to make the move? Was there tangible ROI? Share your case studies, best practices and technical knowledge with an engaged audience of open source peers.

Possible topics include:

  • Application development. How are you building applications using open source databases to power the data layers? What languages, frameworks and data models help you to build applications that your customers love? Are you using MySQL, MongoDB, PostgreSQL, time series or other databases?  
  • Database performance. What database issues have you encountered while meeting new application and new workload demands? How did they affect the user experience? How did you address them? Are you using WiredTiger or a new storage engine like RocksDB? Have you moved to an in-memory engine? Let us know about the solutions you have found to make sure your applications can get data to users and customers.
  • DBaaS and PaaS. Are you using a Database as a Service (DBaaS) in the public cloud, or have you rolled out your own? Are you on AWS, Google Cloud, Microsoft Azure or RackSpace/ObjectRocket? Are you using a database in a Platform as a Service (PaaS) environment? Tell us how it’s going.
  • High availability. Are your applications a crucial part of your business model? Do they need to be available at all times, no matter what? What database challenges have you come across that impacted uptime, and how did you create a high availability environment to address them?
  • Scalability. Has scaling your business affected database performance, user experience or the bottom line? How are you addressing the database environment workload as your business scales? Let us know what technologies you used to solve issues.
  • Distributed databases. Are you moving toward a distributed model? Why? What is your plan for replication and sharding?
  • Observability and monitoring. How do we design open source database deployment with observability in mind? Are you using Elasticsearch or some other analysis tool? What tools are you using to monitor data? Grafana? Prometheus? Percona Monitoring and Management? How do you visualize application performance trends for maximum impact?
  • Container solutions. Do you use Docker, Kubernetes or other containers in your database environment? What are the best practices for using open source databases with containers and orchestration? Has it worked out for you? Did you run into challenges and how did you solve them?
  • Security. What security and compliance challenges are you facing and how are you solving them?
  • Migrating to open source databases. Did you recently migrate applications from proprietary to open source databases? How did it work out? What challenges did you face, and what obstacles did you overcome? What were the rewards?
  • What the future holds. What do you see as the “next big thing”? What new and exciting features just released? What’s in your next release? What new technologies will affect the database landscape? AI? Machine learning? Blockchain databases? Let us know what you see coming.

The Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018 Call for Papers is open until December 22, 2017. We invite you to submit your speaking proposal for breakout, tutorial or lightning talk sessions. Share your open source database experiences with peers and professionals in the open source community by presenting a:

  • Breakout Session. Broadly cover a technology area using specific examples. Sessions should be either 25 minutes or 50 minutes in length (including Q&A).
  • Tutorial Session. Present a technical session that aims for a level between a training class and a conference breakout session. Encourage attendees to bring and use laptops for working on detailed and hands-on presentations. Tutorials will be three or six hours in length (including Q&A).
  • Lightning Talk. Give a five-minute presentation focusing on one key point that interests the open source community: technical, lighthearted or entertaining talks on new ideas, a successful project, a cautionary story, a quick tip or demonstration.

Speaking at Percona Live is a great way to build your personal and company brands. If selected, you will receive a complimentary full conference pass!

Submit your talks now.

Tips for Submitting to Percona Live

Include presentation details, but be concise. Clearly state:

  • Purpose of the talk (problem, solution, action format, etc.)
  • Covered technologies
  • Target audience
  • Audience takeaway

Keep proposals free of sales pitches. The Committee is looking for case studies and in-depth technical talks, not ones that sound like a commercial.

Be original! Make your presentation stand out by submitting a proposal that focuses on real-world scenarios, relevant examples, and knowledge transfer.

Submit your proposals as soon as you can – the call for papers is open until December 22, 2017.

Nov
10
2017
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This Week in Data with Colin Charles 14: A Meetup in Korea and The Magic Quadrant

Colin Charles

Colin CharlesJoin Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

We’re close to opening up the call for papers for Percona Live Santa Clara 2018 and I expect this to happen next week. We also have a committee all lined up and ready to vote on submissions.

In other news, I’ve spent some time preparing for the Korean MySQL Power Group meetup to be held in Seoul this Saturday, 11 November 2017. This is a great opportunity for us to extend our reach in Asia. This meetup gathers together top DBAs from Internet companies that use MySQL and related technologies.

Gartner has released their Magic Quadrant for Operational Database Management Systems 2017. Reprint rights have been given to several vendors, e.g. EnterpriseDB and Microsoft. I’m sure you can find other links. The Magic Quadrant features far fewer database vendors now, many have been dropped. What’s your take on it?

Releases

This was a slow release week. Check out:

Link List

Feedback

I look forward to feedback/tips via e-mail at colin.charles@percona.com or on Twitter @bytebot.

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