Feb
11
2019
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Google Docs gets an API for task automation

Google today announced the general availability of a new API for Google Docs that will allow developers to automate many of the tasks that users typically do manually in the company’s online office suite. The API has been in developer preview since last April’s Google Cloud Next 2018 and is now available to all developers.

As Google notes, the REST API was designed to help developers build workflow automation services for their users, build content management services and create documents in bulk. Using the API, developers can also set up processes that manipulate documents after the fact to update them, and the API also features the ability to insert, delete, move, merge and format text, insert inline images and work with lists, among other things.

The canonical use case here is invoicing, where you need to regularly create similar documents with ever-changing order numbers and line items based on information from third-party systems (or maybe even just a Google Sheet). Google also notes that the API’s import/export abilities allow you to use Docs for internal content management systems.

Some of the companies that built solutions based on the new API during the preview period include Zapier, Netflix, Mailchimp and Final Draft. Zapier integrated the Docs API into its own workflow automation tool to help its users create offer letters based on a template, for example, while Netflix used it to build an internal tool that helps its engineers gather data and automate its documentation workflow.

 

 

Feb
16
2017
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Percona Blog Poll Results: What Programming Languages Are You Using for Backend Development?

Programming Languages

Programming LanguagesIn this blog we’ll look at the results from Percona’s blog poll on what programming languages you’re using for backend development.

Late last year we started a poll on what backend programming languages are being used by the open source community. The three components of the backend – server, application, and database – are what makes a website or application work. Below are the results of Percona’s poll on backend programming languages in use by the community:

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

One of the best-known and earliest web service stacks is the LAMP stack, which spelled out refers to Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP/Perl/Python. We can see that this early model is still popular when it comes to the backend.

PHP still remains a very common choice for a backend programming language, with Python moving up the list as well. Perl seems to be fading in popularity, despite being used a lot in the MySQL world.

Java is also showing signs of strength, demonstrating the strides MySQL is making in enterprise applications. We can also see JavaScript is increasingly getting used not only as a front-end programming language, but also as back-end language with the Node.JS framework.

Finally, Go is a language to look out for. Go is an open source programming language created by Google. It first appeared in 2009, and is already more popular than Perl or Ruby according to this poll.

Thanks to the community for participating in our poll. You can take our latest poll on what database engine are you using to store time series data here. 

Dec
21
2016
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Percona Blog Poll: What Programming Languages are You Using for Backend Development?

Programming Languages

Programming LanguagesTake Percona’s blog poll on what programming languages you’re using for backend development.

While customers and users focus and interact with applications and websites, these are really just the tip of the iceberg for the whole end-to-end system that allows applications to run. The backend is what makes a website or application work. The backend has three parts to it: server, application, and database. A backend operation can be a web application communicating with the server to make a change in a database stored on a server. Technologies like PHP, Ruby, Python, and others are the ones backend programmers use to make this communication work smoothly, allowing the customer to purchase his or her ticket with ease.

Backend programmers might not get a lot of credit, but they are the ones that design, maintain and repair the machinery that powers a system.

Please take a few seconds and answer the following poll on backend programming languages. Which are you using? Help the community learn what languages help solve critical database issues. Please select from one to six languages as they apply to your environment.

If you’re using other languages, or have specific issues, feel free to comment below. We’ll post a follow-up blog with the results!

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post’s poll.

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