Mar
03
2015
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Introducing ‘MySQL 101,’ a 2-day intensive educational track at Percona Live this April 15-16

Talking with Percona Live attendees last year I heard a couple of common themes. First, people told me that there is a lot of great advanced content at Percona Live but there is not much for people just starting to learn the ropes with MySQL. Second, they would like us to find a way to make such basic content less expensive.

I’m pleased to say we’re able to accommodate both of these wishes this year at Percona Live! We have created a two-day intensive track called “MySQL 101” that runs April 15-16. MySQL 101 is designed for developers, system administrators and DBAs familiar with other databases but not with MySQL. And of course it’s ideal for anyone else who would like to expand their professional experience to include MySQL. The sessions are designed to lay a solid foundation on many aspects of MySQL development, design and operations.

As for the price: Just $101 for both full days, but only if you are among the first 101 people to register using the promo code “101” at checkout.  After that the price returns to $400 (still a great price!). :)

The MySQL 101 registration pass includes full access to the Percona Live expo hall (and all the fun stuff happening out there) as well as keynotes, which will inform you about most significant achievements in MySQL ecosystem.

MySQL 101 Percona Live 2015As there is so much information to cover in the MySQL 101 track, we’re running two sessions in parallel – one geared more toward developers using MySQL and the other toward sysadmins and MySQL DBAs, focusing more on database operations. Though I want to point out that you do not have to chose one track to attend exclusively, but rather can mix and match sessions depending what is most relevant to your specific circumstances.

I will be leading a couples tracks myself alongside many other Percona experts who are joining me for those two days!

Here’s a peek at just some of the many classes on the MySQL 101 agenda:

You can see the full MySQL 101 agenda here. Don’t forget the promo code “101” and please feel free to ask any questions below. I hope to see you in Santa Clara at Percona Live! The conference runs April 13-16 in sunny Santa Clara, California.

The post Introducing ‘MySQL 101,’ a 2-day intensive educational track at Percona Live this April 15-16 appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

Sep
10
2014
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Generating test data from the mysql> prompt

There are a lot of tools that generate test data.  Many of them have complex XML scripts or GUI interfaces that let you identify characteristics about the data. For testing query performance and many other applications, however, a simple quick and dirty data generator which can be constructed at the MySQL command line is useful.

First, let’s talk about what kind of data you can easily create with MySQL function calls:

You can generate a decimal number between zero and another number using the MySQL RAND() function like the following query (here between 0 and 10000):

SELECT RAND() * 10000;

Similarly, you can generate a random integer by adding the FLOOR() function:

SELECT FLOOR(RAND() * 10000)

You can generate a random string of 32 characters using MD5():

SELECT MD5(RAND() * 10000)

You can return a random integer between 500 and 1000 with the following:

SELECT FLOOR( 500 + RAND() * (1000 - 500))

You can return a random string from a list of strings by using a table to hold the list. A subselect can select a random name from the list of names.

create table names(id int auto_increment primary key, name varchar(20));
insert into names (name) values ('Justin','Jerry','James','Josh','Julien');
select (select name from names where id = 1 + rand() * 4);

Now we can generate a “fact” table with many rows using fairly simple SQL statements.

First create a table to generate data into:

CREATE TABLE fact (
  dim1 int,
  dim2 int,
  name varchar(20),
  hash varchar(32),
  measure1 double
);

Seed the table with one initial row:

INSERT INTO fact
VALUES (1,1,'Justin',md5(''), .1);

Now grow the table by selecting from the table but providing new random values for the inserted rows:

INSERT INTO fact
SELECT FLOOR(1+ rand()*9999),
       FLOOR(1 + rand()*499),
       (select name from names where id = 1 + rand() * 4),
       MD5(1+rand()*9999),
       rand()
 FROM fact;

As you repeat the INSERT … SELECT, the table will grow exponentially. You may want to add a LIMIT clause to the INSERT … SELECT to reduce the amount of data generated as the table grows.

You will create a table with an even data distribution for each column. You can then add some queries to add skew, either using INSERT … SELECT or UPDATE, for example:

INSERT INTO fact
SELECT 1,1,'Justin',md5(''), .1
  FROM fact
 LIMIT 10000;

That will skew the values by creating many rows with the same data as our initial row.

Using these simple tools, you can generate a data set that is great for testing purposes. For example, dim1 might be a customer_id and dim2 a product_id, and you would populate those tables with 10000 and 500 rows, respectively.

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