Dec
22
2020
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IAC plans to spin off Vimeo as an independent company

IAC announced today that it plans to turn Vimeo into an independent, publicly traded company.

Last month, IAC CEO Joey Levin wrote a letter to shareholders in which he said the holding company had “begun contemplating spinning Vimeo off to our shareholders.” It sounds like the company has moved beyond the contemplation phase, with plans that will be submitted for stockholder approval in the first quarter of 2021, and the actual spin off happening in Q2.

“The combination of Vimeo’s remarkable growth, solid leadership position and enormous market opportunity have made clear its future,” Levin said in a statement today. “It’s time for Vimeo to spread its wings and become a great independent public company.”

While Vimeo once competed with YouTube as a consumer video destination, its strategy has shifted in recent years to providing video tools for businesses. In November, the company said it had 1.5 million paying subscribers and 3,500 enterprise clients — and that its most recent quarter was with positive EBITDA, plus year-over-year revenue growth of 44%.

The announcement notes that this is the eleventh company that IAC has spun off, a process in which it distributes its ownership stake to IAC shareholders. (Match Group completed its separation from IAC over the summer.)

“Today we have a rare opportunity to help every team and organization in the world integrate video throughout their operations, across all the ways they communicate and collaborate,” said Vimeo CEO Anjali Sud in a statement. “Our all-in-one solution radically lowers the barriers of time, cost and complexity that previously made professional-quality video unattainable. We’re ready for this next chapter and focused on making video far easier and more effective than ever before.”

Nov
05
2020
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Vimeo raises $150M, while IAC is ‘contemplating’ a spin-off

Vimeo has raised $150 million in new equity funding, announced in conjunction with the third quarter earnings of its parent company IAC.

In a letter to shareholders, IAC CEO Joey Levin said the company has “begun contemplating spinning Vimeo off to our shareholders.”

“Given Vimeo’s success, and investor adulation for the Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) category generally, we expect Vimeo’s access to capital inside of IAC will be much more expensive than access to capital outside of IAC, and that capital will be helpful to enable Vimeo to achieve its highest ambitions,” Levin continued, adding, “We just tested Vimeo’s ability to access capital with a small private fundraise to bolster Vimeo’s balance sheet and to repay capital to IAC.”

Over the summer, Match Group (which owns a variety of dating services, including Tinder) completed its separation from IAC, with IAC’s ownership distributed to IAC shareholders.

Vimeo, meanwhile, has shifted its focus over the past couple years — instead of trying to compete with YouTube as a consumer video destination, it sells video tools to enterprises and other businesses. For example, it recently launched a free video messaging product called Vimeo Record.

The company says it has 1.5 million paying subscribers and more than 3,500 enterprise clients, including Amazon, Starbucks, Deloitte, Zendesk, Rite Aid and Siemens.

The new funding comes from Thrive Capital and GIC. According to the earnings report, in Q3, Vimeo grew revenue by 44% year-over-year, to $75.1 million. And it had its first quarter of positive EBITDA — $3.4 million.

“Our goal is to radically simplify how businesses create and share video, with tools that are far more intuitive and cost-effective than they’ve been historically,” said Vimeo CEO Anjali Sud in a statement. “We’re energized to access additional capital to pursue this enormous opportunity with the full focus and scale of the Vimeo platform.”

Oct
27
2020
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Vimeo introduces free video messaging with Vimeo Record

Vimeo Record is a new product that allows teams to communicate through video messages.

Vimeo CEO Anjali Sud said that while the pandemic has prompted many offices to embrace digital communication tools like Zoom, “There’s a whole host of work communication that needs asynchronous messaging.”

Besides, sometimes a video can get your message across more effectively, rather than “scheduling another call or writing a long email or Slack thread.”

Sud said that since she became CEO of the IAC-owned video platform in 2017, Vimeo has shifted its focus from being a destination site that competed with YouTube to providing video tools for businesses: “We really want to be the single corporate video solution for the modern organization.”

Vimeo Record is an extension of that strategy. During the pandemic, Vimeo’s revenue has already been growing 40% to 50% year-over-year each month, but Sud said this product been in the works since before then, reflecting the long-term trend that “more and more teams are distributed, and they need ways to communicate.”

Collaborate better remotely with Vimeo Record from Vimeo Staff on Vimeo.

So Vimeo created a Google Chrome extension that allows users to easily record their screen or their face, share and comment on those recordings, organize them into folders with different permissions and receive notifications when someone watches.

Sud said around 400 companies have already been beta testing the feature. Teams are using it to review design and code, to work together to resolve customer support tickets, to share messages from company leadership and more.

Asked whether there’s been a learning curve for recording effective video messages, Sud said, “The biggest barrier is just making it not feel intimidating. The easiest way [to do that] is for people to receive a video message themselves. If a colleague sends you something that’s not perfect, it lowers that intimidation factor.”

She also noted that Vimeo Record fits into the company’s freemium business model. Anyone can send unlimited messages for free, but Vimeo will charge for premium features like the ability to host videos on a third-party, custom-branded video platform.

“My team is using Vimeo Record to share product demos internally and to give our customers a preview of what’s launching soon,” said Mailchimp’s director of product marketing Trevor Wolfe in a statement. “We love it! It adds a personal touch that you just can’t replicate with email or a chatroom message.”

Apr
15
2014
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percona-millipede – Sub-second replication monitor

I recently helped a client implement a custom replication delay monitor and wanted to share the experience and discuss some of the iterations and decisions that were made. percona-millipede was developed in conjunction with Vimeo with the following high-level goal in mind: implement a millisecond level replication delay monitor and graph the results.  Please visit http://making.vimeo.com for more information and thanks to Vimeo for sharing this tool!

Here is the rough list of iterations we worked through in developing this tool/process:

  1. Standard pt-heartbeat update/monitor
  2. Asynchronous, threaded update/monitor tool
  3. Synchronized (via zeroMQ), threaded version of the tool

pt-heartbeat

Initially, we had been running pt-heartbeat (with default interval of 1.0) to monitor real replication delay.  This was fine for general alerting, but didn’t allow us to gain deeper insight into the running slaves.  Even when pt-heartbeat says it is “0 seconds behind”, that can actually mean the slave is up to .99 seconds behind (which in SQL time, can be a lot).  Given the sensitivity to replication delay and the high end infrastructure in place (Percona Server 5.6, 384G RAM, Virident and FusionIO PCI-Flash cards), we decided it was important to absorb the extra traffic in an effort gain further insight into the precise points of any slave lag.

There had been discussion about tweaking the use of pt-heartbeat (–interval = .01 with reduced skew) to look at the sub-second delay, but there were some other considerations:

  • The tool needed to update/monitor multiple hosts from a single process (i.e. we didn’t want multiple pt-heartbeat processes to track)
  • Native integration with existing statsd/graphite system

We likely could’ve achieved the above using pt-heartbeat, but it would’ve required a custom wrapper application to handle the other pieces (threads/subprocesses/inter-process communication).  As the main gist of pt-heartbeat is fairly straightforward (select ts from heartbeat table, calculate delay), it was decided to mimic that logic in a custom application that was configurable and met the other goals.

First Iteration – Async update/monitor

The first iteration was to spin up several threads within a main process (I chose Python for this, but it could be anything really) and set each in a loop with a set delay (.01 seconds for example).  One thread sends update statements with a timestamp, the other threads simply select that timestamp and calculate how long ago the row was updated (i.e. current time – row timestamp):

Async-Monitor

This iteration was better (we could see replication delay of 1-999 ms and isolate some sub-optimal processes), but there was still some concern.  When testing the solution, we noticed that when pointing the monitor against a single box (for both the update and select), we were still seeing replication delay.  After some discussion, it became apparent that using the current CPU time as the baseline was introducing time to calculate the delay as part of the delay.  Further, since these threads weren’t synchronized, there was no way to determine how long after the update statement the select was even run.

Final Iteration – ZeroMQ update/monitor

Based on this analysis, we opted to tweak the process and use a broadcast model to keep the monitor threads in sync.  For this, I chose to use ZeroMQ for the following reasons:

  • Built in PUB/SUB model with filtering – allows for grouping masters with slaves
  • Flexibility in terms of synchronization (across threads, processes, or servers – just a config tweak to the sockets)

After the update, here was the final architecture:

zeromq-Monitor

In this model, the update thread publishes the timestamp that was set on the master and each monitor thread simply waits as a consumer and then checks the timestamp on the slave vs the published timestamp.  Synchronization is built in using this model and we saw much more accurate results.  As opposed to sitting at 5-10ms all the time with spikes up to 50ms, we found 0ms in most cases (keep in mind that means 0ms from an application standpoint with network latency, time to process the query, etc) with spikes up to 40ms.  Here is a sample graph (from Graph Explorer on top of statsd, courtesy of Vimeo) showing some micro spikes in delay that pointed us to a process that was now noticeable and able to be optimized:

vimeo-delay-graph

While this process was what the client needed, there are some things that I’d like to point out about this approach that may not apply (or even hinder) other production workloads:

  • The frequency of update/select statements added several hundred queries per second
    • You could configure less frequent update/selects, but then you may see less accuracy
    •  The longer delay between updates, the less chance you will see delay
  • For replication delay monitoring (i.e. Nagios), 1 second granularity is plenty
    • Typically, you would only alert after several seconds of delay were noticed

Naturally, there are some other factors that can impact the delay/accuracy of this system (pub/sub time, time to issue select, etc), but for the purpose of isolating some sub-optimal processes at the millisecond level, this approach was extremely helpful.

Stay tuned for a followup post where I’ll share the tool and go over it’s installation, configuration, and other details!

The post percona-millipede – Sub-second replication monitor appeared first on MySQL Performance Blog.

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